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Download Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism: A Bishop Rethinks the Meaning of Scripture ePub

by John Shelby Spong

Download Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism: A Bishop Rethinks the Meaning of Scripture ePub
  • ISBN 0060675098
  • ISBN13 978-0060675097
  • Language English
  • Author John Shelby Spong
  • Publisher Harpercollins; 1st edition (March 1, 1991)
  • Pages 267
  • Formats mbr mobi azw lrf
  • Category Bibles
  • Subcategory Bible Study and Reference
  • Size ePub 1390 kb
  • Size Fb2 1807 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 531

Drawing on recent scholarship and personal studies, an Episcopal bishop argues against interpretation of the Bible as literal truth and explains how to make it vital and relevant to twentieth-century life

John Shelby Spong, the Episcopal Bishop of Newark before his retirement in 2000, has been a visiting lecturer at Harvard and at more than 500 other universities all over the world.

John Shelby Spong, the Episcopal Bishop of Newark before his retirement in 2000, has been a visiting lecturer at Harvard and at more than 500 other universities all over the world.

Bishop John Shelby Spong - scourge and heretic to some, prophet, seer and seeker to others - is a singular phenomenon. His insights into Scripture and into the meaning of spirituality and God are most often piercing. And his observations about our world and the role of the spirituality in it are usually poignant and trenchant (mainly in the sense of being forthright but also at times in the sense of being scathing)

Bible, Fundamentalism, Liberalism (Religion). Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by loader-ElisaR on May 25, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Bishop John Shelby Spong, Biblical Literalism: A Gentile Heresy: A pioneer of the .

Bishop John Shelby Spong, Biblical Literalism: A Gentile Heresy: A pioneer of the progressive Christian movement, John Shelby Spong, returns for the&nbs. A Bishop Rethinks Human Sexuality was published by Harper and Row. In that book I was led to question traditional religious attitudes and traditional religious definitions on a wide variety of sexual issues, from homosexuality to premarital living arrangements. There was an immediate outcry from conservative religious circles in defense of something they called biblical morality.

A Bishop Rethinks Human Sexuality was published by Harper and Row. In that book I was led to question traditional religious . A Bishop Rethinks Human Sexuality (1988), Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism: A Bishop Rethinks the Meaning of Scripture (1991), and Resurrection: Myth or Reality?

In this provocative best-seller, the outspoken and controversial Bishop John Shelby Spong reveals how literal interpretations of Scripture have been used to justify slavery ban textbooks deny the rights of gays and lesbians subordinate women and justify war and revenge.

Diğer baskılar - Tümünü görüntüle. Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism: A Bishop Rethinks this Meaning of Script John Shelby Spong Sınırlı önizleme - 2009. RESCUING THE BIBLE FROM FUNDAMENTALISM John Shelby Spong Metin Parçacığı görünümü John Shelby Spong Metin Parçacığı görünümü - 1991. John Shelby Spong, the Episcopal Bishop of Newark before his retirement in 2000, has been a visiting lecturer at Harvard and at more than 500 other universities all over the world.

John Shelby Spong, the Episcopal Bishop of Newark before his retirement in 2000, has been a visiting lecturer at Harvard .

Bishop John Shelby Spong. Bishop John Shelby Spong. However, since I read this book, I became convinced that a 'nice' reading of the Bible (except for some passages in the new Testament) is really difficult, there is just too much nastiness in there. Book Format: Choose an option. Through discussions with a fundamentalist friend of mine, I am half convinced that you cannot just pick and choose here.

Talk about Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism: A Bishop Rethinks the Meaning of Scripture


Samugul
For years I have admired Bishop Spong's courage and confidence as he holds Christian religion accountable by exposing the naturally human character of the Bible. His vast knowledge of its content and its historical settings are worth the read. He has put to words my general
impression of the Bible as a broadly dispersed (temporally) collection of ancient writings that brings to us a partial view of our history (i.e. tomographically presenting a particular 'angle' of this vision). With a priest's scholarship and precision he dismisses the Bible as God's inerrant word and encourages in us a healthier less constrained and less conflicted response. However, I find a major inconsistency in his overall
conclusions and interpretations about the Christian message. Consistent with his methodology, those conclusions and interpretations are not in the Bible either but instead, are his personal extractions, reactions and opinions from its reading. My views differ from his significantly but Bishop Spong is well-intentioned and his work stimulates much needed respectful exchange about the basis of what we come to believe and its dominating influence in western society. In Bishop Spong, I find a writer and thinker who shows that it is possible to have one's Bible and mind open at the same time. I caution the reader that his writing style is quite repetitive but perhaps this comes from a career of much preaching.
Rainpick
I really like/love anything by this author. Only one of his books would rate 2-3 stars, and that is his most recent work. I think he went too far down the rabbit hole with that one, but it was still an interesting read and worth my time.

Born of a Woman re-examines the birth narratives in scripture. Rather than debunking them as inconsistent or trying to explain how the different stories can be reconciled as literally true, he takes a different track. What deep truth made these images and symbols appropriate to express them? What were the writers using as their source or inspiration if not the historical facts? Rather than seeing prophecies fulfilled in the literal way that is often assumed, he looks at the fulfillment in a different way: Early Christians were Jews and used their own culture and history to interpret the Christ experience. How else would they process something so overwhelming and life changing?

If you are a litteralist who fears having your safe and familiar world shaken up, it's not for you. If you have been a litteralist and your world is already shaken, then this may be a place to find something to hold on to... a way to see the scriptures through new eyes, and still value them as true in a way you never considered.

If you are not a litteralist but want to find real meaning in the scriptures and are not always sure how they could be seen as real or relevant then his work is for you. He goes into depth on details I never noticed, and does so in an interesting and readable way.

His work is for Christians who do not always feel comfortable with Church, and wish there was a place where they wouldn't feel that their thoughts are not within Church 'doctrine'( and might not be welcome to express out loud). His work may also be a starting point for people who describe themselves as 'spiritual' but are not sure how such an ancient book can be read as honest and meaningful in the modern world.

If you ever thought the Bible was dull or illogical, or if you are an atheist and want to understand how any rational modern person could take something like the Bible seriously, this is for you.

Many readers would like this, some would hate it. By this time you probably know if you would hate it. If you are not in that group, then you might like it even more than you expect. That was my first experience with Spong; I wouldn't have paid (ANY) money for a "religious" book but it was at the library and had a catchy title. I was hooked!
Weernis
This is a terrific book, one of the best of its genre for my tastes and where I am in my quest for the historical Jesus. Bishop Spong is a genius with words and comparisons, e.g., on pg. 41: “He was a nobody, a child of Nazareth out of which nothing good is thought to come. No one seemed to know his father. He might well have been illegitimate. Hints of that are scattered like undetected and unexploded nuggets of dynamite in the landscape of early Christian tradition. Once again the interpretive task went to work. He was not an illegitimate child, God was his father; he was born of the Holy Spirit. He was not a native of Nazareth, he was born in Bethlehem, the City of David. That Bethlehem birth had been foretold by the prophet Micah. He was not a nobody, he was of the royal house of David. We can trace his genealogy.... His birth was not unnoticed. Angels sang of him, shepherds journeyed to his manger, Eastern sages brought gifts that foretold his greatness.” This is just a taste of how Spong writes. Wow, I could hardly put this book down!!!

On pg.51, regarding Paul’s statement about God exalting Jesus after his death on the cross, Spong writes: “This adoption of Jesus ... into God was the first and original form in which divine sonship for Jesus was claimed by Christian people. This is primitive Christianity.... The implication of God’s adoption is that Jesus becomes God’s Son when the adoption, or exaltation, occurred. The divine sonship claim for Jesus appears originally to have been tied to Easter as the moment of exaltation rather than to Jesus’ birth, and certainly not to his conception.”

The gospel of John, however, with its prologue (John 1:1): “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God” soon took over the birth narratives and as Spong writes on pg. 167, “became the incarnate Word and the preexistent Lord who was born to the virgin Mary by the impregnation of the Holy Spirit.”

“Born of a Woman” is filled with Bishop Spong’s easy-to-read thoughts and comparisons, often in soaring prose. There is so much more to say about this book, which is one of my all-time favorite “quest” books, but I wanted to include a few quotations that I thought were particularly cogent.

According to Spong, I will now call myself a “realist” because he says that realists “are the ones who know that the heart cannot finally worship what the mind has already rejected” (pg. 176). Oh, Amen to that!!

What a writer! What a man! As a fellow Episcopalian, who wonders how much longer I can call myself “Christian” according to many in my church, we need more brave and vocal clergy like Bishop Spong!!!! Before I finish my quest for what I believe in, I plan to read ALL of Spong’s books (among others, of course).