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Download Learn New Testament Greek ePub

by John H. Dobson

Download Learn New Testament Greek ePub
  • ISBN 0801029929
  • ISBN13 978-0801029929
  • Language English
  • Author John H. Dobson
  • Publisher Baker Pub Group (February 1, 1989)
  • Pages 306
  • Formats doc mobi txt azw
  • Category Bibles
  • Subcategory Bible Study and Reference
  • Size ePub 1393 kb
  • Size Fb2 1417 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 862

New and revised material, and an expanded grammar section added to these 52 introductory lessons that can be used as a text, independent-study guide, refresher, or reference.

Learn New Testament Greek provides all the basics of a beginning grammar.

Learn New Testament Greek provides all the basics of a beginning grammar. In addition, it includes a wealth of reading and translation exercises and activities, helpful grammatical resources, accented Greek text, and a Scripture index. The material can be used with equal ease in

John 1 Greek Exegesis with Rev.

John 1 Greek Exegesis with Rev.

New vocabulary items continue to appear and, most importantly, Dobson begins to be more explicit with his grammatical description in greater detail-including discussions of Greek cases and the role of the preposition

Learn New Testament Greek provides all the basics of a beginning . I highly recommend Learn New Testament Greek by John Dobson to anyone that wants to learn New Testament Greek quickly and easily. In addition, it includes a wealth of reading and translation exercises and activities, helpful grammatical resources, and a Scripture index. Thousands of students have benefited from his teaching in colleges and universities. Continue reading about John H. Dobson.

Learn New Testament Greek book.

I highly recommend Learn New Testament Greek by John Dobson to anyone that wants to learn New Testament Greek quickly and easily. This course is well-suited for laymen, students, and preachers and teachers that want to incorporate Greek into their lessons and sermons.

Want to be able to read meaningful verses from the Greek New Testament after just one hour of study? In this comprehensive and helpful guide, John Dobson uses a highly effective teaching method to introduce readers to New Testament Greek. The book is accompanied by an audio CD-ROM. Format Book 384 pages. Dimensions 15. 1 x 23. 1 x 2. 8mm 66. 4g. Publication date 01 Apr 2005.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Learn New Testament Greek by John H. Author: John H. Dobson ISBN 10: 0564078727. Will be clean, not soiled or stained. Books will be free of page markings.

Author: John H.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Learn New Testament Greek by John H Dobson . It is a complete student textbook as well as a comprehensive resource for teachers. Author John H. Short Title LEARN NT GREEK REV/E 3/E.

It is a complete student textbook as well as a comprehensive resource for teachers.

Learn New Testament Greek – John Dobson. Dobson’s book was actually recommended to me by a reader of this site a while back and I’m really glad I took the time to use it. It’s a very different teaching style that gets away from memorizing endless rules to translate.

Talk about Learn New Testament Greek


Wyameluna
Dobson's "Learn New Testament Greek" is perhaps the best tool for learning Biblical Greek for the casual student, pastor, or layman, and may also be the best for serious students.

I only started studying Biblical Greek a few years ago, and Dobson's book was the first I chose to initiate my study, since I have been studying Biblical Hebrew in a recreational fashion for 23 years, and have found Dobson's "Learn Biblical Hebrew" to stand above all other Biblical Hebrew texts purchased, including Weingreen, Mansoor, and others.

In both texts, Dobson provides a practical approach to learning the language that does not require the "feeling" of studying that most other works I have encountered require. This makes his method a great approach for the layman or casual learner who wishes to learn a basic working knowledge of the language without needing to master all of the precise details of grammar and tense. It comes with a companion CD which makes it easy to develop and hone pronunciation as well.

I highly recommend this book as one of the best of practice, and also recommend his other work, "Learn Biblical Hebrew" for those wishing a similar approach to Hebrew.

Enjoy.
Saberdragon
This book is not for scholars - it's not for people who plan on teaching NT Greek ('koine') or pursuing it at a post-graduate level. It really is just an introduction to give you some confidence and familiarity with the original text of the NT so that you can critically evaluate commentaries (and other scholarly texts that argue from 'the Greek'), be more informed when it comes to translations (and be able to do some translating yourself) and, of course, to have some basic empowerment to interpret and understand the text of the NT for yourself.

It will not prepare you to be on a translation committee or to write your own commentary from the Greek. It's goals are more modest, and it is perfectly suited to people doing just a few subjects in NT Greek and exegesis. Once you properly understand *who* Dobson is aiming at and *what* he's trying to teach them, it all makes sense. Accents are useless for his target audience! (I have a major in Classical Greek and let me tell you, I ignored accents for the entire 3 years!) Having chapters of what noun form is taken by each participle is equally useless.

What "we" (the target audience) want is to know how to dive into the Greek text that is there and make some sense of it. Quite simply, Dobson has provided the most incredibly useful, clear, empowering, inspiring and, yes, *comprehensive* text that gives its target audience what they *want* (and giving them anything else would just be a waste anyway). This is the book that frustrates classical scholars and delights seminary students who have no intention of lecturing in ancient Greek... ever! If you're in the latter category, this book's for you.
Faehn
I have only been learning Greek a couple of years and I used Dobson as my introduction to the language. I have no complaints - I enjoyed the experience immensely, and I did not find the inductive learning method to be particularly inhibiting. It really helped me to dive into the GNT itself and learn all the more quickly by immersing myself in the koine text. After reading through the GNT six times and gaining a lot of comprehension proficiency, I am only now going to a deductive grammar (Hewitt) to sort out the structure, so to speak. I find that it is a lot easier to deal with the dryer approach now that I have a lot of familiarity with the GNT and a large vocabulary.

My one quibble is that Dobson uses the book as a platform to preach dynamic equivalence at every possible moment. I am not a major proponent of formal equivalance, so I am not offended by the dynamic equivalence position in and of itself, but Dobson keeps ramming home the point that a good translation is not one that is literal, but one that gets the thought process across - almost to the point where he seems eager to indoctrinate the reader to his translation position, which to me should not be the point of this book. As someone else mentioned in their review, a 1st year Greek student is not in a position to critique translation anyway, so why not just teach us the language and hope we advance far enough to come to our own conclusions about formal vs dynamic when we are sufficiently educated years down the line?
Opilar
Ron England's summation resonated loudly within me:
" Will you learn a whole bunch, quickly and easily? Yup, you will. And you'll have fun doing it.
This is one w o n d e r f u l little book. A treasure. A gem. A delight. A perfection between two covers. A smart buy. Order once; pay twice -- it'll be worth it. "

I, a septuagenarian, found Mounce's grammar mind-numbing, and put it aside, where it has been gathering dust ever since. To my great delight, I subsequently discovered Dobson.
After Dobson I shall move on to David Allan Black's grammar and the supplemental workbook.
Those who have to learn NT Greek in a short time, will probably have to suffer through the traditional method. Being a man of leisure, I wish to ENJOY my studies, soaking it up in modest portions, with ample practice.
FLIDER
This is a pretty easy book to study. It includes a CD that is a pleasure to listen to. After reading this book I was able to make my way through NT Greek text with the help of a short NT Greek-English dictionary such as A Concise Greek-English Dictionary of the Greek New Testament. This book makes good use of the passage found in John 1:1-2 (In the beginning there was the word...) as an example. I did feel, however, that the verb tenses could have been explained a little better. In particular I would have liked a better explanation of the Aorist verb tense. It is worth noting that "aorist" translated literally from Greek means "without horizon". The aorist tense is defined as expressing a completed or single action--as such it does not go on and on indefinitely and can therefore be thought of as "without horizon".