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Download Wake Up: A Life of the Buddha ePub

by Robert Thurman,Jack Kerouac

Download Wake Up: A Life of the Buddha ePub
  • ISBN 0143116010
  • ISBN13 978-0143116011
  • Language English
  • Author Robert Thurman,Jack Kerouac
  • Publisher Penguin Books (October 27, 2009)
  • Pages 224
  • Formats lrf txt docx mbr
  • Category Bibles
  • Subcategory Catholicism
  • Size ePub 1307 kb
  • Size Fb2 1763 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 546

Jack Kerouac?s profound meditations on the Buddha?s life and religionIn the mid-1950s, Jack Kerouac, a lifelong Catholic, became fascinated with Buddhism, an interest that had a significant impact on his ideas of spirituality and later found expression in such books as Mexico City Blues and The Dharma Bums. Originally written in 1955 and now published for the first time in paperback, Wake Up is Kerouac?s retelling of the life of Prince Siddhartha Gotama, who as a young man abandoned his wealthy family and comfortable home for a lifelong search for enlightenment. Distilled from a wide variety of canonical scriptures, Wake Up serves as both a penetrating account of the Buddha?s life and a concise primer on the principal teachings of Buddhism.

The book features an introduction by the noted American Buddhist scholar Robert Thurman which discusses Kerouac's understanding of Buddhism as it appears in "Wake Up" and in "The Dharma Bums" and which explores Kerouac's understanding of the relationship between Buddhism and the Catholicism to which he was born.

Home Jack Kerouac Wake Up: A Life of the Buddha. Kerouac clearly loved the compassion stuff, what the Tibetans call the magnificent deeds lineage descended from Maitreya and Asanga. Wake up a life of the b. .Wake Up: A Life of the Buddha, . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16. Table of Contents. Frontispiece: Enlightenment, a drawing by Jack Kerouac. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature, The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations.

Home Jack Kerouac Wake Up: A Life of the Buddha Robert A. F. Thurman. Jey Tsong Khapa Professor of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Studies, Columbia University. Robert A.

Though raised Catholic, in the early 1950s Jack Kerouac became fascinated. The book features an introduction by the noted American Buddhist scholar Robert Thurman which discusses Kerouac's understanding of Buddhism as it appears in "Wake Up" and in "The Dharma Bums" and which explores Kerouac's understanding of the relationship between Buddhism and the Catholicism to which he was born.

Wake Up: A Life of the Buddha. by Jack Kerouac and Robert Thurman

Wake Up: A Life of the Buddha. by Jack Kerouac and Robert Thurman. Though raised Catholic, in the early 1950s Jack Kerouac became fascinated with Buddhism, an interest that would have a profound impact on his ideas of spirituality and their expression in his writing from Mexico City Blues to The Dharma Bums.

Thurman (Goodreads Author) (Introduction). Published September 18th 2008 by Penguin Books.

by Jack Kerouac First published August 28th 2008. Author(s): Jack Kerouac (Preparation), Robert . Thurman (Goodreads Author) (Introduction). ISBN: 0143116010 (ISBN13: 9780143116011). ISBN: 1616847352 (ISBN13: 9781616847357).

Distilled from a wide variety of canonical scriptures, Wake Up serves as both a concise primer on the concepts of Buddhism and as an insightful and deeply personal document of Kerouac s evolving beliefs.

Author:-Thurman, Robert A. Title:-Wake Up: A Life of the Buddha. Genre:-Religion - World Religions. Paperback Jack Kerouac Books. Jack Kerouac Books Travel. HarperCollins Books Jack Kerouac. Jack Kerouac Biographies & True Stories Paperback Books. Additional site navigation.

A Life of the Buddha. By Jack Kerouac Introduction by Robert Thurman. By Jack Kerouac Read by Danny Campbell.

Talk about Wake Up: A Life of the Buddha


sergant
This is an unusual book in the Kerouac corpus: part Buddhism filtered through working class, French-Canadian Catholicism; part retelling of classic Buddhist writings; and most of all, part baring of the soul of a man intimately acquainted with suffering & loss, which informs the always energetic, tumbling flow of his prose. In writing of the Buddha as a counterpart to Christ, Kerouac is really offering his own confession of exactly where he was at that moment, struggling with the painful personal questions of purpose, meaning, despair & salvation. In short, it's essentially his own spiritual autobiography to that point in his life.

Some reviewers have complained that this isn't "real" Buddhism, or that it's woefully misunderstood at best. And I can't entirely disagree—if that's the viewpoint from which you're reading this book. In that case, it's bound to disappoint. But I'd suggest that reading it as the naked statement of the individual man, one caught up in the possibilities of redemption & meaning that his struggling but earnest perception of Buddhism offered him, may well be more rewarding for the reader.

In any case, it's well worth reading simply for the beauty & vividness of the language, composed when he was at the height of his power as a writer. I only wish there was a recording of Kerouac reading it himself, as he was always the best reader of his own work, with a wonderful voice that was open & honest, filled with life—and that included suffering as well as joy, intermingling in a way that goes right to the heart. The audiobook version captures some of that with a skilled reader; but try reading it aloud to yourself & see how it sounds.

So—an absolutely vital book? Perhaps not, even for some Kerouac devotees ... but for me, a lovely, sometimes heartbreaking work that illuminates both his writing & his life—for that reason, hsppily recommended!
Rolling Flipper
In the early 1950s, Jack Kerouac (1922 -- 1969)became fascinated with Buddhism. In 1955, he wrote this short, highly personalized biography of the Buddha, "Wake Up". The biography was serialized in 1993 in the Buddhist magazine "Tricycle" but it has never before appeared in book form. The book was published to coincide with the 50th anniversary of Kerouac's most overtly Buddhist novel, "The Dharma Bums" which has also appeared in a new commemorative edition this year.

"Wake up" is a small gem. The writing is a passionate mixture of Kerouac and Buddhist texts. The book shows fervor and commitment and explains what Kerouac found valuable in Buddhism. The Buddha is treated as almost an Asian equivalent of Jesus. Kerouac never left the Catholicism in which he was raised. He was among the first of a long generation of Americans that have tried to combine the insights of the Buddha with a western religion.

For an American in the 1950s Kerouac had read widely if unsystematically in Buddhism. Thus this biography draws on texts from different Buddhist traditions which are not fully consistent with each other. In much of the book, Kerouac drew on a book called "The Buddhist Bible" in which an earlier American writer, Dwight Goddard, who likewise was attracted to both Buddhism and Christianity, translated some basic Buddhist texts. Kerouac had great problems with alcohol, drugs, and sex througout his life. As often is the case, the writer was wiser than the man. "Wake up" evidences an excellent lay understanding of the Buddhism which so inspired Kerouac. While this book is introductory, informal and nonscholarly, Kerouac had a sympathetic grasp of his subject.

Kerouac describes the purpose of his book at the outset: "I have designed this to be a handbook of the ancient Law. The purpose is to convert." But this, Kerouac meant to transform the reader by showing the life-changing character of Buddhist teachings.

Here is how Kerouac begins his biography.

"Buddha means the awakened one. Until recently most people thought of Buddha as a big fat rococo sitting figure with his belly out, laughing, as represented in millions of tourist trinkets and dime store statuettes here in the western world... This man was no slob-like figure of mirth , but a serious and tragic prophet, the Jesus Christ of India and almost all Asia." (p7) Kerouac describes how the Buddha grew disillusioned with his life of luxury, his dancing girls, and even his lovely wife when, at the age of 29, he was confronted with the facts of aging, sickness and death. He left the life of a prince and became a wanderer in search of understanding human suffering for the purpose of alleviating it.

Kerouac loosely follows the story of Buddha's life, focusing upon his Englightenment experience six years after his wandering began. The Englightenment is described in a mixture of Buddhist texts and Kerouac's inimitable prose. As Kerouac describes it in part:

"Ho there! Wake up! the river in your dream may seem pleasant, but below it is a lake with rapids and crocodiles, the river is evil desire, the lake is the sensual life, its waves are anger, its rapids are lust, and the crocodiles are the women-folk."(p44) Earlier, Kerouac quotes an "eminent writer" who said that in looking for the cause of human unhappiness Gotama had "sought for it in man and nature, and found it not, and lo! it was in his own heart!" (p.21)

Kerouac leads the reader through the Buddha's ministry, his disciples, and his teachings including the famous "fire sermon" with a focus on the difficult Buddhist teachings of dependent origination and emptiness, which he explains well. Near the end of the book, Kerouac offers a long metaphysical discussion of the nature of reality and emptiness based upon a text known as the Surangama Sutra, which Kerouac knew from the translation in Goddard. The book closes with a Sutra-based account of the Buddha's death in which Kerouac writes

"The moon paled, the river sobbed, a mental breeze bowed down the trees.".... Voluntarily enduring infinite trials through numberless ages and births, that he might deliver mankind and all life, foregoing the right to enter Nirvana and casting himself again and again into Sangsara's stream of life and destiny for the sole purpose of teaching the way of liberation from sorrow and suffering, this is Buddha who is everyone and everything." (pp 145-146)

The book features an introduction by the noted American Buddhist scholar Robert Thurman which discusses Kerouac's understanding of Buddhism as it appears in "Wake Up" and in "The Dharma Bums" and which explores Kerouac's understanding of the relationship between Buddhism and the Catholicism to which he was born.

Readers interested in Buddhism or in Kerouac will enjoy this little-known book.

Robin Friedman
Agalen
I love this book. Pre-drunk/derangement Kerouac. Lovely vibe and spirit. Good hearted book.
Kardana
Such excellent writing and Buddhist understanding from Kerouac. An excellent rad.
Kaim
Many passages of this short book are beautiful, striking and poetic. Kerouac was sincerely impressed and inspired by the Buddha and WAKE UP was his meditation on the life and example of Buddha. For that alone, I would call this an important book.

For someone seeking information, it falls woefully short. Kerouac has written a poetic version of Buddha stitched together from various uncited sutras. There is a long philosophical discussion in the middle with Buddha instructing his disciple Ananda which seems murky as if Kerouac was copying from a translation he didn't completely understand. Also, Kerouac's subsequent career and life showed that he was not practicing Buddhism in a practical sense. His assertions about what he perceived Buddhism to be should be taken with a grain of salt.

After reading several scholarly biographies of the Buddha, the poetic stream of consciousness style that Kerouac adopted was very refreshing. One needs to read this book when in the mood for a mystical turn of mind and enjoy the poetic gems that swim to the surface. On the negative side, stream-of-consciousness does not lead to greater coherence when discussing obtruse philosophical points.
For a better explication of the philosophy, I'd recommend THE BUDDHA SAID by Osho.

Ultimately, this book may be interesting and valuable for people who are interested in a better understanding of Kerouac, and as a landmark point in the development of American Buddhism.
Asyasya
A wonderful and somewhat poetic version oh the life of the Buddha.
Vetalol
Great!!!
Amazing little book. A profound revelation. Fascinating read!