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Download Electing Not to Vote: Christian Reflections on Reasons for Not Voting ePub

by Ted Lewis

Download Electing Not to Vote: Christian Reflections on Reasons for Not Voting ePub
  • ISBN 1556352271
  • ISBN13 978-1556352270
  • Language English
  • Author Ted Lewis
  • Publisher Wipf & Stock Pub (May 31, 2008)
  • Pages 140
  • Formats docx mobi mbr lrf
  • Category Bibles
  • Subcategory Theology
  • Size ePub 1454 kb
  • Size Fb2 1515 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 734

Ethical discourse about the institution of voting rarely includes the option of abstaining for principled reasons. This collection of nine articles widens the discussion in that direction by giving readers a new question: At what point and on what grounds might one choose not to vote as an act of conscience? Contributors offer both ethical and faith-based reasons for not voting. For some, it is a matter of candidates not measuring up to high standards; for others it is a matter of reserving political identity and allegiance for the church rather than the nation-state. These writers--representing a wide range of Christian traditions--cite texts from diverse sources: Mennonites, Pentecostals, and pre-Civil Rights African Americans. Some contributors reference the positions of Catholic bishops, Karl Barth, or John Howard Yoder. New Testament texts also figure strongly in these cases for "conscientious abstention" from voting. In addition to cultivating the ethical discussion around abstention from voting, the contributors suggest alternative ways beneficially to engage society. This volume creates a new freedom for readers within any faith tradition to enter into a dialogue that has not yet been welcomed in North America.

As Lewis acknowledges in his introductory remarks, the essays in Electing Not to Vote contribute to but certainly don't . My personal reasons for not voting were simple. If there was one person who would be able to make a noticeable difference, everyone would vote for that person

As Lewis acknowledges in his introductory remarks, the essays in Electing Not to Vote contribute to but certainly don't conclude the conversation. In some of the essays, for example, I thought that possibly false dilemmas were being drawn between the impurity of voting and the purity of abstention. If there was one person who would be able to make a noticeable difference, everyone would vote for that person. I did vote this past election, the first time in decades. This book was an excellent read from various perspectives on what it means to call oneself a Christian and belonging to the Kingdom of God.

Electing Not to Vote book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Electing Not to Vote: Christian Reflections on Reasons for Not Voting as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Description: Ethical discourse about the institution of voting. Start by marking Electing Not to Vote: Christian Reflections on Reasons for Not Voting as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Electing Not to Vote. Contributors offer both ethical and faith-based reasons for not voting. Ethical discourse about the institution of voting rarely includes the option of abstaining for principled reasons. For some, it is a matter of candidates not measuring up to high standards; for others it is a matter of reserving political identity and allegiance for the church rather than the nation-state. These a wide range of Christian traditions-cite texts from diverse sources: Mennonites, Pentecostals, and pre-Civil Rights African Americans. Some contributors reference the positions of Catholic bishops, Karl Barth, or John Howard Yoder.

Ted Lewis, ed. Electing Not to Vote . Indeed, one of the book’s most interesting features is the breadth of ecclesial perspectives represented. Michael Degan, Tato Sumantri, Ted Lewis, Andy Alexis-Baker, and Nekeisha Alexis-Baker offer strong rejections of voting. Electing Not to Vote: Christian Reflections on Reasons for Not Voting. Eugene, OR: Cascade, 2008. Authors come from Mennonite, Pentecostal, Catholic, Baptist, and intentional Christian community traditions, and they write from, and sometimes to, those communities. For these authors, not voting is apparently the norm.

Although the book was published in 2008, I did not find out about it until after the presidential election of 2012.

Here is a wonderful little book that answers a big question that most of us American Christians have lost. Cascade. Voting has been inflated from a democratic right to a Christian responsibility, and we have been so accustomed to thinking positively about voting that it’s difficult for us to think like Christians

Electing not to vote. Christian reflections on reasons for not voting. Introduction, - Ted Lewis. Polls apart: why believers might conscientiously abstain from voting - John D. Roth. Published 2008 by Cascade Books in Eugene, Ore. When there is nothing to vote for: liberalism, John Howard Yoder, and the church - Andy Alexis-Baker. Freedom of voice: non-voting and the political imagination - Nekeisha Alexis-Baker. Serving by abstaining: Karl Barth on political engagement and disengagement - G. Scott Becker. Electing not to vote: whether choosing red or blue, politics is love of Mammon - Michael Degan.

See Ted Lewis, e. Electing Not to Vote: Christian Reflections on Reasons for Not Voting (Eugene, OR: Cascade Books . Neil Postman, The End of Education (New York: Vintage Books, 1995), . oogle Scholar. Electing Not to Vote: Christian Reflections on Reasons for Not Voting (Eugene, OR: Cascade Books, 2008). 21. Douglas Jacobsen and Rhonda Hustedt Jacobsen, Scholarship & Christian Faith: Enlarging the Conversation (New York: Oxford, 2004), 2. rossRefGoogle Scholar.

Not voting can be dressed up as an act of principled, passive resistance, but in fact not voting is actively handing power over to those whose interests are counter to your own, and those who would be very glad to take advantage of your absence. Not voting is for suckers.

Short books to feed your craving for ideas. Our daily coverage of the world of ideas. Not voting can be dressed up as an act of principled, passive resistance, but in fact not voting is actively handing power over to those whose interests are counter to your own, and those who would be very glad to take advantage of your absence. Imagine where this country would be if all the folks who in 2010 created the Tea Party had decided that, you know, politics is too messy, voting is too complicated.

Reflections from a Political Scientist on Future Directions in Peace Studies and Theology. Ted Lewis, ed. Eugene, Or: Cascade. Victor J. Hinojosa and Aníbal S. Pérez-Liñán, Presidential Survival and the Impeachment Process: The United States and Colombia Political Science Quarterly, 121 :4, 653-675, 2006. Exiles in the Empire: Believer’s Church Perspectives on Politics. Nathan E. Yoder and Carol A. Sheppard, eds. Kitchener, On. Pandora Press.

Talk about Electing Not to Vote: Christian Reflections on Reasons for Not Voting


grand star
Great book on non participation in civil Government.
xander
In 2000, fifteen Canadians, members of the Edible Ballot Society, pureed and ate their voting ballots at polling booths. They were, they proclaimed, "hungry for democracy." Finding no candidate on the ballot to assuage their hunger, they decided to express their dissatisfaction with a profoundly inspired bit of guerilla theatre.

This story, which opens Andy Alexis-Baker's contribution to the excellent Electing Not to Vote, provides one reason for abstention from voting: the possibility that the available candidates are nutritionless, white-breaded fast foods. Another might be the sad realization that federal elections tend to be money-driven, corporate-influenced, and Electoral College-led affairs which pay more lip than actual service to the democratic ideal.

But for the Christian committed to Jesus's radical message of nonviolence, there are other reasons for abstention, and the authors in this volume explore them with grace and insight. Voting in federal elections is a gesture that can implicitly acquiesce to the powers and principalities of the world, violate Christ's counter-cultural resistance to Caesar, and promote a most unChristian adversarial spirit among those who get swept up in partisan wrangling. (The recent presidential primary feuding between the two leading Democrat contenders is a case in point.) Voting can also be a secular analog of cheap grace, providing voters with the comfortable impression that they've done their bit simply by pulling a polling booth lever, and thereby discouraging imaginative alternatives to social change.

The defenses of these positions in Electing Not to Vote is never heavy-handed. The authors are quite aware of the high stakes of arguing against the sacred rite of voting, and go to some pains to insist that abstention from voting must always be accompanied by more fruitful alternative labor for social justice, labor that first and foremost is a witness to their faith. In several of the essays, I sensed moments of the same ambivalence which I, and I'm sure any practitioner of Christian nonviolence, have felt about participating in electoral politics. Should I, or shouldn't I? What's the right thing to do? It's to editor Ted Lewis' credit that he recognizes these sorts of questions need to be addressed rather than, as is typical, ignored. Although abstention isn't likely to be a popular option, and even though it's a difficult decision even for those who ultimately embrace it, talking about it allows for "a new kind of freedom: specifically, a freedom for readers to ask questions that for the most part have not been welcome within the discourse of our society and of our faith communities" (p. ix).

As Lewis acknowledges in his introductory remarks, the essays in Electing Not to Vote contribute to but certainly don't conclude the conversation. In some of the essays, for example, I thought that possibly false dilemmas were being drawn between the impurity of voting and the purity of abstention. I would've also liked to have seen some analysis of how broad Christian abstention should be: if one refuses on principle to vote, shouldn't one also refuse on principle to pay taxes (at least those earmarked for war, prisons, etc)? If not, why not? Finally, it seems to me that greater reflection on how far one can bend one's faith commitment without compromising it is necessary. After all, Christians compromise their beliefs everyday, most obviously in consumer choices. Where's the point of no return?

But the fact that these sorts of questions are generated by the essays in Electing Not to Vote only underscores their richness. Highly recommended.
Binthars
My personal reasons for not voting were simple. If there was one person who would be able to make a noticeable difference, everyone would vote for that person. I did vote this past election, the first time in decades. This book was an excellent read from various perspectives on what it means to call oneself a Christian and belonging to the Kingdom of God. The essays cause one to think more deeply about their faith and reasons for voting or not voting.