derrierloisirs.fr
» » Neal Cassady: The Fast Life of a Beat Hero

Download Neal Cassady: The Fast Life of a Beat Hero ePub

by Graham Vickers,David Sandison

Download Neal Cassady: The Fast Life of a Beat Hero ePub
  • ISBN 1556526156
  • ISBN13 978-1556526152
  • Language English
  • Author Graham Vickers,David Sandison
  • Publisher Chicago Review Press; 1st edition (September 1, 2006)
  • Pages 340
  • Formats lrf mobi azw lit
  • Category Biography
  • Subcategory Arts and Literature
  • Size ePub 1253 kb
  • Size Fb2 1728 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 940

This fascinating and in-depth biography of Neal Cassady takes a look at the man who achieved immortality as Dean Moriarty, the central character in Jack Kerouac’s On the Road. A charismatic, funny, articulate, and formidably intelligent man, Cassady was also a compulsive womanizer who lived life on the edge. His naturalistic, conversational writing style inspired Kerouac, who lifted a number of passages verbatim and uncredited from Cassady’s letters for significant episodes in On the Road. Drawing on a wealth of new research and with full cooperation from central figures in his life—including Carolyn Cassady and Ken Kesey—this account captures Cassady’s unique blend of inspired lunacy and deep spirituality.

Cassady wasn't a beat hero

Cassady wasn't a beat hero. He was a drug addict who destroyed himself causing untold anguish to his family and close friends. A very sad story indeed like that of Kerouac. This book does fill in a lot of facts in Neal's life for the record, which makes the book a worth-while read for real fans, but out of all the great photos of Neal, the one used for the cover makes him look like a deranged killer. Neal was "guilty as charged", but there's so much more to the story, such as his writing and his deep love of music and literature, which are only mentioned in passing.

This book does fill in a lot of facts in Neal's life for the record, which makes the book a worth-while read for real fans, but out of all the great photos of Neal, the one used for the cover makes him look like . Cassady wasn't a beat hero.

This book does fill in a lot of facts in Neal's life for the record, which makes the book a worth-while read for real fans, but out of all the great photos of Neal, the one used for the cover makes him look like a deranged killer.

Cassady wasn't a beat hero

Cassady wasn't a beat hero.

Home Browse Books Book details, Neal Cassady: The Fast Life of a Beat . This biography of Neal Cassady was David Sandison's idea.

Home Browse Books Book details, Neal Cassady: The Fast Life of a Beat Hero. Neal Cassady: The Fast Life of a Beat Hero. By David Sandison, Graham Vicker. David was fascinated not only by the wild patterns of Cassady's life but also by the strange paradox of a uniquely creative mind that somehow managed to change the course of American literature by proxy and also influence both the beats and the hippies.

David Sandison, Graham Vickers. This fascinating and in-depth biography of Neal Cassady takes a look at the man who achieved immortality as Dean Moriarty, the central character in Jack Kerouac’s On the Road. A charismatic, funny, articulate, and formidably intelligent man, Cassady was also a compulsive womanizer who lived life on the edge.

Neal Cassady achieved mythical status when Jack Kerouac turned him into Dean Moriarty, the hero of On The Road

Neal Cassady achieved mythical status when Jack Kerouac turned him into Dean Moriarty, the hero of On The Road. In this major biography David Sandison and Graham Vickers trace the life of the wild man from Denver who galvanised Kerouac and the Beat Generation not by artistic endeavour but by his extravagant life-affirming behaviour and epic feats of cross-country driving. Dead before his forty-second birthday, Cassady was surrounded by legends and tall stories quite literally from birth.

Neal Cassady: The Fast Life of a Beat Hero, by David Sandison & Graham Vickers (2006). Off the Road: Twenty Years with Cassady, Kerouac, and Ginsberg, by Carolyn Cassady. Black Spring Press (1990). Stephenson, Gregory (2007). Friendly and Flowing Savage: The Literary Legend of Neal Cassady". Incorporated in The Daybreak Boys: Essays on the Literature of the Beat Generation (1990).

Neal Cassady: The Fast Life of a Beat Hero. by David Sandison and Graham Vickers. Neal Cassady - David Sandison. This biography of Neal Cassady was David Sandison’s idea. David was fascinated not only by the wild patterns of Cassady’s life but also by the strange paradox of a uniquely creative mind that somehow managed to change the course of American literature by proxy and also influence both the beats and the hippies.

To survive the ordeal and avoid a beating that would result if he yelled for help Neal responded by putting his mind in a state of suspension until he was freed again. He later described the experience as that of an ’off-balanced wheel’ whirling inside his head. As this whirling sensation picked up momentum it would ‘set up a loose fan-like vibration’ as time gradually tripled its normal speed.

A comprehensive portrait of a Beat Generation Legend that attempts to demythologize the cornucopia of myths swirling around Neal Cassady. However, his life makes such an interesting read that it remains mythological. Published by Thriftbooks

A comprehensive portrait of a Beat Generation Legend that attempts to demythologize the cornucopia of myths swirling around Neal Cassady. Published by Thriftbooks. or those interested in Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters.

Talk about Neal Cassady: The Fast Life of a Beat Hero


Arcanescar
This book is for fans of Beat Writers....or those interested in Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters. This is a comprehensive and well researched and written biography on Neal Cassady, a buddy and inspiration to Jack Kerouac. ( Neal was Dean Moriarity in On the Road) as well as the driver on Kesey's bus trip to New York and a key figure in Kesey's Merry Pranksters. The authors' make the point ( which Kerouac also espoused) that Neal's ecstatic and uncensored letter writing style greatly influenced Kerouac's switch to spontaneous writing following his publication of The Town and the City (Kerouac's first Wolfian styled book) and resulted in what eventually became On the Road....with Kerouac's and Cassady's adventures being the central part of the book. Neal, at Jack's urging to be a writer, struggled to be a writer of novels and of consequence...but outside of letters, some quite long, and a book titled the First Third, nothing ever great came from Neal's writing. So he served as an inspiration to Kerouac and those he encountered especially Kesey..Neal's great myth was based on his amazing mind and his physical presence in the world. His was a high energy and at times a tortured life. This book seems like a balanced telling of Neal's life and is consistent with some of the people who I have interviewed who knew Neal...I could question a couple minor points but they really don't belong in this general review nor are critical to the overall thrust of the book....It's amazing this book was completed by two authors, one dying before the book was completed, because the writing style remains consistent through out. If this is a topic area you are interested in, this is a book worth reading...well done.
LivingCross
Good read. Neil was cool.
Fordregelv
Enjoyed it entertaining and informative. I have a good understanding of who Neal Cassady was and what his life was about.
Gann
How fitting that Neal's biographer be a man who took-up writing the book with second thoughts, almost unwillingly as a favor to a friend (mentioned in the foreword). As in life, so in death Neal is an orphan. From chapter one, which begins with "a correction", Neal is sent to a correctional institution, i.e. this book. Nothing Neal does, not even being born, agrees with the author. In short the book is a hatchet job; the author is determined to deflate the Cassady legend; Neal is a sometimes entertaining con-man; and Kerouac and Kesey were his fools.

That Neal might have symbolized America in some way, at least in a cultural context, rarely enters the author's mind. Like James Dean, Neal drove fast, lived high, and died young. Also like Dean, he entered the pantheon of cultural heroes and stood for a time and place. He died giving birth to the counter-cultural 60s. Neal Cassady influenced Jack Kerouac, Allan Ginsberg and Ken Kesey, the three authors most responsible for "The 60s" as we know them. Known by Kesey as "The Fastest Man Alive", he was also arguably the hippest white person alive in the late 40s and early 50s.

But little of that gets into this book; the author instead paints his portrait of Neal from the viewpoint of Neal's long-suffering wife Carolyn, whom Neal took for granted. Neal was a man who never should have married; he'd been "raised" by an alcoholic hobo of a father; thus he had no model of what a home should be. He'd made a stab at home-life. After many false starts, he married, had kids and got a job on the Southern Pacific Railroad. But a bust and stretch in San Quentin prison over three sticks of marijuana blew all that away.

One of the few interesting facts brought out in the book is Neal's apparent manic-depression which many fans of On the Road had intuited about Neal. Bursts of wild abandon and cross-country high-speed driving (he was a skilled driver who could do anything with a car, but put many people's lives in danger), would alternate with bouts of depression and attempts at suicide. The author is never in doubt about Neal; the book is an indictment of Cassady, who was no doubt an impulsive con-man, as Kerouac's "On the Road" takes pains to point out. But he was also in love with culture, both high and low. One of the authors biggest beefs against Neal is that he never wrote a book, but "On the Road" is very much indebted to Neal's letters, both in style and substance; Neal was at least 50% the real author of "On the Road", as well as it's protagonist. Kerouac implies as much in his last line of the book.

This book does fill in a lot of facts in Neal's life for the record, which makes the book a worth-while read for real fans, but out of all the great photos of Neal, the one used for the cover makes him look like a deranged killer. Neal was "guilty as charged", but there's so much more to the story, such as his writing and his deep love of music and literature, which are only mentioned in passing. Neal's only real monument will continue to be "On the Road" and his amazing letters, which are published in another book.
Dagdalas
Cassady wasn't a beat hero. He was a drug addict who destroyed himself causing untold anguish to his family and close friends. A very sad story indeed like that of Kerouac. Read it for the basic information but ignore the idolatry. Read Off the Road as well by his long suffering wife Caroline Cassady, her book sweeps away all the myth's. You'll meet the man in all his raw unfulfillment and despair and the impact on her and their children. Very sobering.
Fordg
If you're related to Neal Cassady, this book has done all your ancestrial digging for you. It's well laid out with information that's as factual as the author could obtain. Some is incorrect like the name of Neal's little sister, which was Shirley Jeanne and not Shirley Jean. I believe the author captured the misspelling in a book where Neal misspelled his sister's name. My brother never learned to spell my name either, so it's plausible. The information isn't gleened from historical archives as much as written information obtained from family.

All in all, it gives great insight into how a man turned out the way he did. It wasn't an easy life, and the hardships he endured lead to an early death. He wasn't a legend in his own time, but future generations have made him one.

If you're even a bit curious about Neal Cassady, this is one of the most complete books about him. It's also a great book if you want to know about the early days of Colorado and the Great Depression.
Maman
excellent book for those in the know, much better than the slight previous attempt, accessed here:The Holy Goof: A Biography of Neal Cassady,which, though modest is not unrecommended. this new biography is based heavily on a privately printed work, the first volume of which is here:Neal Cassady: Volume One 1926-1940.Neal Cassady A Biography Volume One 1926 - 1940. also recommended are neal's 3 volumes of letters, and his wife carolyn's memoirs. an excellent website is here: [...]