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Download The Element of Lavishness: Letters of William Maxwell and Sylvia Townsend Warner, 1938-1978 ePub

by Michael Steinman,Sylvia Townsend Warner

Download The Element of Lavishness: Letters of William Maxwell and Sylvia Townsend Warner, 1938-1978 ePub
  • ISBN 1582431183
  • ISBN13 978-1582431185
  • Language English
  • Author Michael Steinman,Sylvia Townsend Warner
  • Publisher Counterpoint; 1st edition (December 2000)
  • Pages 340
  • Formats azw rtf mbr lrf
  • Category Biography
  • Subcategory Arts and Literature
  • Size ePub 1612 kb
  • Size Fb2 1126 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 797

In July 1938, William Maxwell, then twenty-nine years old and the acting poetry editor of The New Yorker, wrote to Sylvia Townsend Warner inviting her to send him verse. Miss Warner, forty-four and famous for her novel Lolly Willowes, had recently begun writing stories for the magazine, antic, inimitable sketches of English life that Maxwell adored. The poems were sent, and a remarkable friendship was begun.

Many of the letters deal with both Warner's and Maxwell's writing. On occasion Maxwell has to gracefully reject one of Warner's stories (usually with the reassurance that the story is wonderful "but not for The New Yorker").

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The Element of Lavishness: Letters of William Maxwell and Sylvia Townsend Warner, 1938-1978

The Element of Lavishness: Letters of William Maxwell and Sylvia Townsend Warner, 1938-1978. Sylvia Townsend Warner. By then, you will not only have made friends with someone born to write (you may even put off the last letter for fear of letting her go), you will have acquainted yourself with a bygone idiom. Any discerning reader (how many remain?) would be hard-pressed to discover finer-wrought epistolary Literature.

Sylvia Townsend Warner (6 December 1893 – 1 May 1978) was an English novelist and poet. She also made a contribution to musicology as a young woman. Sylvia Nora Townsend Warner was born at Harrow on the Hill, Middlesex, the only child of George Townsend Warner and his wife Eleanor "Nora" Mary (née Hudleston).

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Items related to The Elements of Lavishness: Letters of Sylvia . Bibliographic Details  . Books are returnable within 5 days, with prior notification.

Items related to The Elements of Lavishness: Letters of Sylvia Townsend. The Elements of Lavishness: Letters of Sylvia Townsend Warner & William Maxwell 1938-1978. Bibliographic Details Publisher: Washington, . Many books in stock are not computer catalogued. Do inquire if looking for an item not listed.

Sylvia Townsend Warner, an immensely popular writer, now diminished by the fate that awaits all . The connection continued after Maxwell retired from the New Yorker at the age of 67 and handed Warner over to his successor.

Sylvia Townsend Warner, an immensely popular writer, now diminished by the fate that awaits all once popular writers, lived in Dorset with her female companion Valentine Ackland, while Maxwell was a contentedly married man with two children.

The Element of Lavishness. Letters of Sylvia Townsend Warner & William Maxwell, 1938–1978

The Element of Lavishness. Letters of Sylvia Townsend Warner & William Maxwell, 1938–1978. Maxwell and Warner’s happy and profound literary friendship is chronicled in their copious correspondence, collected here in a feast of intelligence and expression that will delight any devoted reader - even one unfamiliar with the fiction of the two authors.

Sylvia Nora Townsend Warner (6 December 1893 - 1 May 1978) was an English poet and novelist. Townsend Warner was born in Harrow on the Hill (a suburb of London), the only child of George Townsend Warner and his wife Eleanora (Nora) Hudleston. Her father was a house-master at Harrow School and was, for many years, associated with the prestigious Harrow History Prize which was renamed the Townsend Warner History Prize in his honour, after his death in 1916

Talk about The Element of Lavishness: Letters of William Maxwell and Sylvia Townsend Warner, 1938-1978


Onath
One of the most engaging books of letters I've ever read (and I've read a lot of them). This is one of those rare books that you hate nearing the end of.
Pettalo
Sylvia Townsend Warner counted herself very lucky to have William Maxwell as her New Yorker editor and readers of this volume of their correspondence would agree Warner wrote 153 stories between 1936 and 1977 and found a devoted and discering fan in Maxwell. Many of the letters deal with both Warner's and Maxwell's writing. On occasion Maxwell has to gracefully reject one of Warner's stories (usually with the reassurance that the story is wonderful "but not for The New Yorker"). But what the reader comes to appreciate are the writers' accounts of momentous occasions and everyday life. Maxwell gives us wonderful accounts of an Adlai Stevenson rally and the Vietnam Moratorium. His account of the NYC blackout (in a letter dated November 17, 1965)is one of the best things I've ever read and worth the price of the book. It's such a seamless piece of writing, with each detail depending on what came before, that to quote bits of it would be to trivialize it.
Maxwell, who lived with his wife and two daughters in NYC, is also good with domestic detail and affecting and funny observations. He relates a conversation in which his small daughter laments that he is bald."'Would you trade me in for a daddy with more hair?'" 'Yes," she says, teaching me a lesson."
And on his resuming piano lessons in middle age: ". . .And Mozart is sustaining though I cannot do it. I would rather not be able to do Mozart than any composer I can think of."
Townsend who lived in England with her companion, Valentine Ackland offers a number of home remedies for illness, my favorite being champagne for any ailment above the waist, brandy for anything below. And she writes with droll humor of her life in an English village: "Poor Niou (a Siamese cat) has just had her first affair of the heart, and of course it was a tragedy. As a rule he flies from strange men, cursing under his breath, and keeping very low to the ground. Yesterday an electrician came; a grave mackintoshed man, but to Niou all that was romantic and lovely. He gazed at him, he rubbed against him, he lay in an ecstasy on the tool-bag. The electrician felt much the same, and gave him little washers to play with. He said he would come again today to to finish off properly. Niou understands everything awaited him in dreamy transports and practising his best and most amorous squint. The electrician came, Niou was waiting him on the windowsill. A paroxysm of stage-fright came over him, and he rushed into the garden and disappeared.
He'll get over it in time; but just now he's terribly downcast."
The volume is filled with fine writing and the reader wants very much to know these two people personally.