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Download The Plague And I (Common Reader Editions) ePub

by Betty Bard MacDonald

Download The Plague And I (Common Reader Editions) ePub
  • ISBN 1888173297
  • ISBN13 978-1888173291
  • Language English
  • Author Betty Bard MacDonald
  • Publisher Akadine Press (July 1, 2000)
  • Pages 254
  • Formats lrf docx rtf lrf
  • Category Biography
  • Subcategory Arts and Literature
  • Size ePub 1921 kb
  • Size Fb2 1284 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 599

You know how sometimes friendship blossoms in the Þrst few moments of meeting? “Something clicked,” we say. Well, that’s what discovering Betty MacDonald was like for me: I happened to read a couple of pages of one of her books and — click — knew right away that here was a vivacious writer whose friendly, funny, and Þery company I was really going to enjoy. Although MacDonald’s Þrst and most popular book, The Egg and I, has remained in print since its original publication, her three other volumes have been unavailable for decades. The Plague and I recounts MacDonald’s experiences in a Seattle sanitarium, where the author spent almost a year (1938-39) battling tuberculosis. The White Plague was no laughing matter, but MacDonald nonetheless makes a sprightly tale of her brush with something deadly. Anybody Can Do Anything is a high-spirited, hilarious celebration of how “the warmth and loyalty and laughter of a big family” brightened their weathering of The Great Depression. In Onions in the Stew, MacDonald is in unbuttonedly frolicsome form as she describes how, with husband and daughters, she set to work making a life on a rough-and-tumble island in Puget Sound, a ferry-ride from Seattle.

Also by Betty MacDonald.

Also by Betty MacDonald. Mary and I were distinguished from Cleve by broad-brimmed dark blue beaver hats which Gammy clamped on our heads just as she finished forcing my hand into Mary’s mitten and herding us out the front door and into the biting winter air. In the excitement, we creaked along in the snow for half a block before we became aware that Mary had on Cleve’s leggings which were so tight in the crotch that she had to walk on tiptoe, that Cleve’s coat was buttoned up the back leaving him red-faced and choking in the front and that he was further hampered by.

by Betty Bard MacDonald. Coauthors & Alternates. ISBN 9781888173291 (978-1-888173-29-1) Softcover, Akadine Press, 2000. Learn More at LibraryThing. Betty Bard MacDonald at LibraryThing.

The Plague and I book At the age of thirty, the author was diagnosed with TB, then a common illness, whose only cure was bed rest in a dedicated sanatorium.

The Plague and I book. The Plague and I is the second memoir by Betty MacDonald, and listening to it really transports the reader back to the 30s, when times were simpler yet also more complicated in some ways. In this story, MacDonald recalls her childhood and then her tuberculosis diagnosis, and the majority of the story focuses on her treatment at a sanitarium called The Pines. At the age of thirty, the author was diagnosed with TB, then a common illness, whose only cure was bed rest in a dedicated sanatorium.

Betty MacDonald (March 26, 1907 – February 7, 1958) was an American author who specialized in humorous autobiographical tales, and is best known for her book The Egg and I. She also wrote the Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle series of children's books

Betty MacDonald (March 26, 1907 – February 7, 1958) was an American author who specialized in humorous autobiographical tales, and is best known for her book The Egg and I. Piggle-Wiggle series of children's books. She is associated with the Pacific Northwest, especially Washington state. MacDonald was born Anne Elizabeth Campbell Bard in Boulder, Colorado. Her official birth date is given as March 26, 1908, although federal census returns seem to indicate 1907.

Thus begins Betty MacDonald's memoir of her year in a sanatorium just .

Thus begins Betty MacDonald's memoir of her year in a sanatorium just outside Seattle battling the "White Plague. MacDonald uses her offbeat humor to make the most of her time in the TB sanatorium-making all of us laugh in the process. The Plague and I takes up Betty's delightful misadventures where The Egg and I left off. She continued chronicling her life story with memoirs Anybody Can Do Anything and finally Onions in the Stew. She lived on Vashon Island in Washington's Puget Sound.

Thus begins Betty MacDonald’s memoir of her year in a sanatorium just outside Seattle battling the White Plague. Lifestyle & Sports Biographies Memoirs. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Today, tuberculosis is rare in North America thanks to vaccines and antibiotics, but in 1938, when Betty MacDonald was diagnosed, it was more common and more deadly

Today, tuberculosis is rare in North America thanks to vaccines and antibiotics, but in 1938, when Betty MacDonald was diagnosed, it was more common and more deadly. The only treatment was complete bedrest in a sanitorium, generally costly

BETTY MACDONALD was born Anne Elizabeth Campbell Bard in Boulder, Colorado, on 26. .Also by betty macdonald.

BETTY MACDONALD was born Anne Elizabeth Campbell Bard in Boulder, Colorado, on 26 March 1908. She married Robert Heskett in 1927 and settled on a forty-acre chicken farm near Chimacum, Washington. The Plague and I. Anybody Can Do Anything.

Getting tuberculosis in the middle of your life is like starting downtown to do a lot of urgent errands and being hit by a bus. When you regain consciousness you remember nothing about the urgent errands

Getting tuberculosis in the middle of your life is like starting downtown to do a lot of urgent errands and being hit by a bus. When you regain consciousness you remember nothing about the urgent errands. You can't even remember where you were going. Thus begins Betty MacDonald's memoir of her year in a sanatorium just outside Seattle battling the "White Plague.

Talk about The Plague And I (Common Reader Editions)


Orevise
I had seen the movie "the egg and I" of course and knew it was based out here in northwest where I have lived all my life but I really didn't know anything about the author Betty McDonald until a few years ago our local paper did a story on her and her books then I saw "The Plague and I" it sounded very funny to me and she is! even while undergoing a harrowing health scare and stay at a tuberculosis sanatorium in the late 1930's so that is great story on it's own but for me what I found so fascinating is that I have been there and inside the buildings in the early 70's it was a religious School at the time and I had a girl friend who went there. I knew the place must have had quite a past and it was fun to read about it.
Nuadabandis
Sixty years ago, a sullen fourteen-year old, I curled up in a big armchair and read THE PLAGUE AND I. My laughter got louder and louder, closer to shrieks, and finally my father stormed into the room and yelled, "Quit that! No book is that funny!" He grabbed the book from me and said, "Go do your homework!" I stormed outside and flopped huffily into the hammock.

When, huffed out, I finally came back in, my mother said, "Well, I hope you're satisfied! Your father's teeth are broken!" I was used to getting blamed for small crises in the household, but was really mystified by this accusation. Mom turned her back to me, but I could hear an amused snort escape.

"He was reading that book of yours in the bathroom. Laughed so hard his teeth fell out and broke on the floor tiles."

I have just now finished another reading of THE PLAGUE AND I. It's even more fun than it was all those years ago. Just keep your teeth in.
Usishele
You wouldn’t think a story about having Tuberculosis would be funny, but written by Betty MacDonald, it was almost as laughable as “The Egg & I”. Her take on some of the caregivers was so spot-on, still true today! And the other patients she encountered were as hysterical and varied as any group of friends could be. A wonderful read, not gloomy or morose, although it did have a couple cases of friends who didn’t heal. I’d recommend it to anyone in a hospital, rehab setting especially, but fun for everyone to read.
TheFresh
I originally read this book when I was fourteen and have always remembered how much I was enthralled by it. Several years ago I started a quest to get a copy and re-read it, but I couldn't find any except crazily expensive used copies. Then just recently I found Amazon suddenly had unused paperback copies for a reasonable price (I assume a reprint). Now I'm blissfully reading this entertaining (MacDonald's wit was superb) and informative book and enjoying it even more than I did as a teenager!
Tiv
This is Betty MacDonald's second book, and is more of a follow-up than a sequel to her monster hit, "The Egg and I."

It details her diagnosis of TB, and her time spent in a sanitarium as she heals and regains her strength. It takes place during the late 1930s, during the tail-end of the Great Depression.

It does provide a fascinating glimpse into the health care of that era, and the psyche of people who are forced to deal with a serious illness.

It's well worth your time.
Mariwyn
As a depression baby and growing up in the results thereof, I find this book and the rest of Betty's books to be great reading.
Do you ever wonder why people born in that era save almost everything? Tell you to eat everything on your plate? Why there
was so much TB and how they dealt with it? What life was like for so very many people at the start of World War II? In spite
of it all, there was great courage and amazing humor in it if you kept the right attitude. Betty catches that humor and courage very well in her books. I suggest reading the "Egg and I" first, there is a continuity that is contagious !
Garr
I bought this book to read for a school assignment, but I ended up really liking it. The book doesn't go into depth about Tuberculosis, but it gives perspective on what life was like in a Sanitorium in the 30s. It was very interesting and also pretty funny. I started reading the book, but finished it by listening to the audiobook (which I highly recommend The Plague and I: Common Reader Editions). It does have some foul language towards the middle of the book.
Betty Macdonald is a joy to spend time with. Reading her account of surviving not only tuberculosis, but also months in a high-discipline, high-results clinic, is like sitting down to tea together and having a good ol' gossip. Her account is populated with fully fleshed in patients and fully neurotic nurses. You'll gulp this sweet story down and when you come up for air, you'll want to read her other books, like "The Egg & I" or the Miss Piggy-Wiggle stories.