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Download Rice Room: Growing Up Chinese-American From Number Two Son toRock 'N' Roll ePub

by Ben Fong-Torres

Download Rice Room: Growing Up Chinese-American From Number Two Son toRock 'N' Roll ePub
  • ISBN 0786860022
  • ISBN13 978-0786860029
  • Language English
  • Author Ben Fong-Torres
  • Publisher Hyperion; 1st edition (April 14, 1994)
  • Pages 272
  • Formats mbr lrf rtf mobi
  • Category Biography
  • Subcategory Arts and Literature
  • Size ePub 1185 kb
  • Size Fb2 1300 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 154

A leading entertainment journalist offers a poignant portrait of growing up Asian American, detailing his journey from alienation and the traditional world of his parents to assimilation and acceptance in the world of journalism. Tour.

This book is about a Chinese family, Fong, who migrated to San Francisco. Fong-Torres had a foot in two worlds-he was on the one hand growing up in San Francisco at the time of the birht of rock and roll.

This book is about a Chinese family, Fong, who migrated to San Francisco. It talked about how hard life is for the Fong in a different country. The most mesmerizing part of this autobiography is when the author talked about how his traditional Chinese cultures had hindered his life. On the other, he was the son of immigrants, who had a w I read this book to my son, who was assigned it for his Understanding American Culture class in college-it is a great desctription of the experience of Asian Americans in the peri-WWII time period.

Fong-Torres, Ben. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by YoshikoM on September 2, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Rice Room: Growing U. .This book is about a Chinese family, Fong, who migrated to San Francisco.

Ben Fong-Torres’s book is one man’s journey into the heart of contemporary America. From childhood to manhood we see his struggles and triumphs as he negotiates growing up in the 60s with Elvis, hippie rock and roll, personal tragedy, and a Chinese-American soul. A witty, moving, heartfelt read. THE RICE ROOM: Growing Up Chinese American From Number Two Son to Rock 'n' Roll. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus.

This book is unusual in that it details a first generation minority person, growing up in America, while experiencing one of the most tumultuous eras in the past 50 years in this country. I'd read a lot of his articles/interviews in Rolling Stone, and heard him on the Howard Stern show recently, so wanted to hunt down this biography. I'd recomend this to everyone interested in American history. Наиболее популярные в Научная литература. Показать все. Текущий слайд {CURRENT SLIDE} из {TOTAL SLIDES}- Наиболее популярные в Научная литература.

Ben Fong Torres lets it all fly about being an Asian American Man growing up and seeing the world through his . My inspiration for this important and emotional family gathering, was Ben Fong-Torres' book, "The Rice Room.

Ben Fong Torres lets it all fly about being an Asian American Man growing up and seeing the world through his parents eyes and also dealing with life in America and the mind set and culture. yes obviously his profession allowed him to interview and be asosciated with a whose who of show business and the crazy stories of his early days at. rolling stone, et.however his story is about mental strength and belief that got him through so many hurdles and this book is a great read from start to finish and the journey in between. One person found this helpful.

Fong-Torres concludes that his parents' Chinese ways actually produced hard-working, decent children. An enjoyable, thought-provoking tale of family ties and cultural identity, but rock 'n' roll fans may be frustrated by the author's emphases.

The Rice Room is a brilliant and moving memoir of growing up in Oakland's Chinatown, by one of America's preeminent journalists

The Rice Room is a brilliant and moving memoir of growing up in Oakland's Chinatown, by one of America's preeminent journalists. Ben Fong-Torres was the third child of first-generation Chinese parents. His father came to America via the Philippines, adding "Torres" to his name to convince immigration officials that he was Filipino, since there were strict limits on the number of Chinese immigrants that were allowed. His mother came into the country under similarly deceptive circumstances. Fong-Torres (Hickory Wind, 1991) got his unusual name -""the greatest by-line in the world,"" one colleague said - from his father, who bought a Filipino birth certificate to circumvent immigration laws.

Ben Fong-Torres is known to us as primarily a chronicler of rock 'n' roll. In his book, "The Rice Room: Growing Up m Number Two Son to Rock 'n' Roll," he adeptly writes about not only himself and his family, but also America

Ben Fong-Torres is known to us as primarily a chronicler of rock 'n' roll. In his book, "The Rice Room: Growing Up m Number Two Son to Rock 'n' Roll," he adeptly writes about not only himself and his family, but also America.

Talk about Rice Room: Growing Up Chinese-American From Number Two Son toRock 'N' Roll


monotronik
If you enjoyed the movie Almost Famous, then you'll enjoy this as well. Fantastic story and should be a movie as well!! Considering how well "fresh off the boat" is doing, this would be a smart choice for Hollywood.
zzzachibis
Pretty good read... interesting character and history of the Chinese immigrant.
Kaghma
Excellent book!
Simple
A great book if you are interested in the Chinese American community in the San Francisco Bay Area in the 1950s - present. Also quite a bit about the workings of Rolling Stone.
Chuynopana
I needed this book for a school assignment. I got it in time and actually enjoyed the reading. The book was like new. I am satisfied with the service I received.
elegant stranger
Great condition for the price I paid! !
Soustil
I really enjoyed reading about Ben Fong Torres' life growing up in Oakland's Chinatown. He has a very different perspective than writers of many of the books I've read lately, in that he grew up as an American, appreciating American culture and thought. I've read some reviews that said he sold out his own culture, but I disagree. I'd say that he was very typical. I can completely understand why much of his parents' ways were lost on him and his siblings while they were young.
As someone who is half-Iranian, exposed to many traditions, proverbs, food, and extremely different perceptions of women and men, what was proper behavior, and family life, I can totally relate to this book. As a child, I, too, didn't "get it." I didn't appreciate these differences, and I viewed the Iranian way as nonsense, backwards, idiosyncratic, and generally a pain in the butt.
Oftentimes when one grows up in a family whose parent(s) are immigrants, the children will naturally want to assimilate into the society in which they live. In this case they'll want to be American. However, it isn't until they become adults that they start to appreciate or understand their heritage, which was the case with Torres' memoir, and that discovery on his part makes the whole story that much more touching.
His sense of humor comes shining through in his work as well, which is a nice change from other writers. I enjoyed his detailed descriptions of the hippy movement in San Francisco, and it was fascinating to see the difference between the movement on the streets--mainly for fashion and partying, versus the movement in the universities, which was political, the heart of all the changes.
The only thing that kind put me off was the way Ben Fong-Torres juggled multiple relationships. Although he was the first to admit that his maturity level wasn't exactly up to par when it came to women, I was surprised at how much he (and his brother Barry) were able to do this unscathed.
I'm glad that he wrote in detail about his siblings, how they struggled as well, especially his brother Barry, who was the impetus behind this book (I almost wish he wrote as much about his sisters!). Ben Fong-Torres obviously had (and probably still has) a very interesting life with a great many stories to tell. There were many facets to his life; the Chinese-American experience, his appreciation for rock n' roll music, his work with the Rolling Stone, and his ever-evolving relationship with his family. His story is worth reading.
It would have been tempting for Ben Fong Torres to write one of those "rockstars I've met" memoirs, replete with purple prose about purple people. Ben Fong Torres takes a different tack in this autobiography, telling us about two disparate worlds. One is the world of being the child of Chinese immigrants, living without a great deal of money. The other is the story of a man who seemed born to be a journalist, coming of age in 1960s San Francisco.

Many novels chronicle the Asian American experience in California with a magical realism. The author instead uses a conversational, simple style.

The book is not free from flaws. One section of the book tries to communicate the 60s "free love" experience, but comes off a bit like "hippie chicks I've conquered". It's as though the social failure from high school must show his belated prowess even after all these years. But it's a quibble, overall.

But overall, this book feels more "real" than many more "visionary" works. Mr. Fong Torres' description of how a family tragedy indirectly helps him connect the disparate pieces of his bicultural world really works well.

I thought this book would be flamboyant. It is anything but. It's a simple, solid read by a good writer. It's worth taking in.
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