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Download A Small Moment of Great Illumination: Searching for Valentine Greatrakes, The Master Healer ePub

by Leonard Pitt

Download A Small Moment of Great Illumination: Searching for Valentine Greatrakes, The Master Healer ePub
  • ISBN 1593761260
  • ISBN13 978-1593761264
  • Language English
  • Author Leonard Pitt
  • Publisher Counterpoint; First Printing edition (October 5, 2006)
  • Pages 196
  • Formats lrf rtf lit lrf
  • Category Biography
  • Subcategory Historical
  • Size ePub 1497 kb
  • Size Fb2 1699 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 463

Renowned for his healing powers, Greatrakes stood at the center of one of the great controversies of his age involving scientists, theologians, physicians, and philosophers. Many proclaimed his cures a miracle. Others denounced him as a quack.Recent court battles over intelligent design affirm that the conflict between science and religion still rages, but what was the debate like in its earliest flowering? A Small Moment of Great Illumination visits England at the height of the Scientific Revolution to find the answer embodied in Greatrakes. Claiming he could heal others simply by touching them, Greatrakes became the target for a rising contest between the clergy and laymen who would champion the emerging scientific theories of the day. This biography traces his ascendance in the high societies of England and Ireland and his relationships with poet Andrew Marvell, philosopher Henry More, and scientist Robert Boyle.Pitt interlaces the biography with his own adventures, Pitt's pursuit of the Irish healer turned up many magical discoveries. Including eye-witness accounts of Greatrakes's healing and correspondence from Greatrakes on how he discovered his powers, this book pieces together the life and times of an enigmatic forgotten figure.

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Renowned for his healing powers, Greatrakes stood at the center of one of the great controversies of his age involving .

Renowned for his healing powers, Greatrakes stood at the center of one of the great controversies of his age involving scientists, theologians, physicians, an. .

com's Leonard Pitt Page and shop for all Leonard Pitt books. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Leonard Pitt.

Scientists - General, Biography And Autobiography, Western Europe - History, Biography & Autobiography, Biography, Autobiography, phy, Biography & Autobiography, Science & Technology, Medical - General, Modern - 17th Century, Western Europe - General, 1629-1683, Greatrakes, Valentine,, Mental healing.

Valentine Greatrakes exercising his power of faith healing. Pitt, Leonard (2006). Valentine Greatrakes (14 February 1628 – 28 November 1682), also known as "Greatorex" or "The Stroker", was an Irish faith healer who toured England in 1666, claiming to cure people by the laying on of hands. 2 War, the Commonwealth and Protectorate Family. Emeryville, CA: Shoemaker & Hoard.

Leonard Pitt (a performer and one-time mime) is fascinated by a footnote in an article on the history of medicine referring to a 17th-century Irish healer named Valentine Greatrakes. Greatrakes began his healing career at 34. After several successes, particularly with leprosy, deafness and a form of tuberculosis known as the king’s evil, he achieved a celebrity that drew the attention of King Charles II, who brought him to England. Independently wealthy, he never charged for his work. Most Read Entertainment Stories.

Biographical and critical sources: Periodicals.

Published October 5, 2006 by Shoemaker & Hoard. Healers, Mental healing, Biography, Eccentrics and eccentricities.

Scion of Irish gentry, Valentine Greatrakes (1628–83) had an impulse one day. He felt, like many after him, that he could effect cures by the laying on of his hands. His good wife told him, plainly, that he was a fool.

Talk about A Small Moment of Great Illumination: Searching for Valentine Greatrakes, The Master Healer


Najinn
Leonard Pitt "takes a vacation" so to speak on a number of occasions to study the little known healer, Valentine Greatrakes. He gives a homey and friendly study of GR. He might some day update his story after reading a bit on the great mesmerists who followed him.
Centrizius
I am a descendant and had heard about the doctor from grandmother many years ago.Glad of opportunity to read it
Glei
Very rewarding book especially for me as I live right between Affan of Greatrakes and Lismore Castle of Robert Boyle in Glenribbeen.
Zacki
Valentine Greatrakes is a small footnote in history, an Irishman who for a period during the 17th century performed cures for scrofula (“the King’s Evil”), malarial fever (“ague”), epilepsy (“the falling sickness”) and other diseases of the time by stroking the patient.

Leonard Pitts is not very clear about what motivated him to research the life of “the Irish Stroker”. A small footnote about Greatrakes piqued his interest, the names of noted scientists of the period who attested to Greatrakes’ success stoked the fire, and over the next year he recounts trips to Ireland and England to trace the healer’s career, sessions of discovery in the British Library, and hunts in antiquarian bookshops for original copies of the few publications by and about Greatrakes. The search, like all treasure hunts, is fascinating – we thrill at each new discovery along with Pitts.

I finished this small book wishing I could settle on some topic which would lead me on a similar adventure.
Lanadrta
Who was Valentine Greatrakes? And should we even care? A footnote in an historical article lead the author of `A Small Moment of Great Illumination' on a decade-long search to find out. Greatrakes was a 17th-century Irish nobleman who appeared to have the power to heal with his hands alone--but being neither a member of the clergy, nor a King, his use of this power (sometimes effective, sometimes not) made him a radical, dangerously near the boundaries of clergy and royalty that his station (high as it was) did not permit. His healing powers made him especially suspect in Restoration England and Ireland, when tensions ran high between royalists and regicides, Protestants and Catholics. Nevertheless, Greatrakes' apparent ability to heal so many made him popular as well as infamous. Many denounced him as a quack, while others of high authority (no less than Robert Boyle) attested to the efficacy of his abilities.

This was the Greatrakes uncovered by the author of `Small Moment,' and the story is made more interesting for being interwoven with narratives of the author's research trips to England, Ireland and even Scotland--following in Greatrakes' footsteps. The tale takes us back and forth between the 17th and 20th centuries, in and out of libraries, archives, castles and pubs. The length of the narrative is just right--the author knows when to stop one section and switch to another (in many cases, had he lingered a minute longer we'd be bored).

This is a history of a history, a diary of historical research and the story of the research subject itself. It is made more readable by the fact that the author is an amateur (he was supported in his research and travels by a friend who is a professional historian). But `Small Moment' does not suffer because of it--the writing is good and the historical recreation appears to be solid. And while most may no longer care just who Valentine Greatrakes was, the exercise of rediscovering him--and the author's obsession with finding an original copy of ones of Greatrakes' books--brings to the fore the excitement of historical research for its own sake.
Kalrajas
Part travelogue, part detective story, part comedy -- it's a quest. This is the story of the author's quest to know more about a footnote. The footnote was in a history of medicine he was reading almost twenty years ago. The footnote talked about one Valentine Greatrakes, an Irish master healer of the mid 1600's. Herein is the search. Through libraries, antiquarian booksellers, across England and Ireland - I suspect in not just a few pubs along the way.

Oh yeah! They were looking for a copy of Greatrakes diary. They went to a dowser who told them it was in a trunk in Bathgate, Scotland. Off to Scotland. Can you imagine going up to a lady in her house saying, 'we have reason to believe that a rare book we're looking for is in a trunk in your attic.' ... Here come the people wearing the white clothes looking for you. They have this hotel where the walls have padding on them so you won't hurt yourself.

A Delightful read.