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Download The Cardinal's Hat: Money, Ambition, and Everyday Life in the Court of a Borgia Prince ePub

by Mary Hollingsworth

Download The Cardinal's Hat: Money, Ambition, and Everyday Life in the Court of a Borgia Prince ePub
  • ISBN 1585678031
  • ISBN13 978-1585678037
  • Language English
  • Author Mary Hollingsworth
  • Publisher The Overlook Press (May 2, 2006)
  • Pages 308
  • Formats doc mbr docx azw
  • Category Biography
  • Subcategory Historical
  • Size ePub 1534 kb
  • Size Fb2 1339 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 880

The Cardinal's Hat is the fascinating story of how Ippolito d'Este, the second son of Lucretia Borgia, acquired the coveted cardinal's hat and became the Archbishop of Milan.

Working with Ippolito's letters and ledgers, recently uncovered in an archive in Modena, Italy, Mary Hollingsworth has pieced together a fascinating and undeniably titillating tale of this Renaissance cardinal and his road to power and wealth in sixteenth century Europe. The ledgers document every aspect of Ippolito's comings and goings, and he comes to life out of the minutiae, as do the lives of his staff.

Hat : Money, Ambition, and Housekeeping in a Renaissance Court.

The Cardinal's Hat : Money, Ambition, and Housekeeping in a Renaissance Court. by Mary Hollingsworth. In The Cardinal's Hat: Money, Ambition, and Everyday Life in the Court of a Borgia Prince (Overlook Press), Hollingsworth has set out her findings in detail. Ippolito has, of course, been written about before, but mostly as an important patron of the arts; he built the magnificent Villa d'Este at Tivoli and he was a patron of the musician Palestrina.

The Cardinal's Hat book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Working with Ippolito's letters and ledgers, recently uncovered.

The Cardinal's Hat" was a light, yet interesting tale of a & Cardinal'. This is another book which brings to light how young these boys were entering the "religious life". Some of them were 10 years of age and younger but already well on their way to the Vatican. Using an enormous trove of documents she stumbled upon in the archives of Modena, Hollingsworth brings to vivid and detailed life the world of Ippolito d' Este, one of the sons of the notorious Lucrezia Borgia and her last husband, Duke Alfonso d'Este of Ferrara. I for one had my curiosity quenched and fulfilled because of Hollingsworth's extensive discussions on all parts of Renaissance life: from the simple running of a household to court traditions and practices. Apart from that, it is also rich in details about the lives of the common people. There are plenty of discussions on common people earn their living and how they spend them. I really enjoyed this book, but I admit that some people who can be easily bored by the mountain of details poured in the book.

A riveting portrait of the day-to-day life of a wealthy, worldly Renaissance prince as he pursues power and influence in the . Out of these finely detailed records, Hollingsworth brings to life not only Ippolito, but his world

A riveting portrait of the day-to-day life of a wealthy, worldly Renaissance prince as he pursues power and influence in the Catholic church (USA Today). The second son of Alfonso d’Este and Lucretia Borgia, the Duke and Duchess of Ferrara, Ippolito d’Este was made the archbishop of Milan at the age of nine. Out of these finely detailed records, Hollingsworth brings to life not only Ippolito, but his world. In this brilliant piece of historical detective work and narrative reconstruction.

org/viaf/74104371 Ippolito d' Este a schema:Person ; schema:birthDate "1509" ; schema:deathDate "1572" ; schema:familyName "Este" ; schema:givenName "Ippolito d'" ; schema:name "Ippolito d' Este"

By Mary Hollingsworth. The Cardinal's Hat. Mary Hollingsworth

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Dr Mary Hollingsworth is the author of Patronage in Renaissance Italy and Patronage in Sixteenth-century Italy. Paperback (1st thus). Money, Ambition and Everyday life in the court of a Borgia Prince Near Fine. Seller Inventory 3490. More information about this seller Contact this seller.

The Cardinal’s Hat: Money, Ambition and Housekeeping in a Renaissance Court (2004). Patronage in Sixteenth Century Italy (1996). Patronage in Renaissance Italy: From 1400 to the Early Sixteenth Century (1994). Architecture of the 20th Century (1988). Art in World History (2008). The Family Medici: The Hidden History of the Medici Dynasty (2018). Retrieved 11 November 2017.

Talk about The Cardinal's Hat: Money, Ambition, and Everyday Life in the Court of a Borgia Prince


Nahn
"The Cardinal's Hat" was a light, yet interesting tale of a `Borgia Cardinal'. This is another book which brings to light how young these boys were entering the "religious life". Some of them were 10 years of age and younger but already well on their way to the Vatican. With all of the `palm slapping', bribes and gifts being presented to win favor, it makes you wonder how much time was actually spent on religious, and philosophical studies which seem so imperative in today's `spiritual society'. Back then it was more about securing political ties to gain approval in the `courts of power'. Even being born to the right family wasn't adequate to secure a cardinal hat as you will find reading this short story. Cardinal Hats were not cheap; they were acquired by a hefty sum which encompassed money, property and most of all, your undying allegiance.

On the other hand, this book was a little slower than anticipated. For example - chapter 2 goes into meticulous detail about every little item and its cost in the household. I personally think chapter 2 could have been MUCH shorter because it proved so hard to keep focus. You find yourself getting bored after a relative short period. I kept longing for the book to pick up and it would, at times... Moreover, I would dive in as soon as I discovered a few juicy details about popes, kings, mistresses and famous plots, only to realize the book was already slowing down again by returning to the minutest facets including every price, expense, wage, bill, fee, charge, amount, cost, expenditure, payment, salary, and stipend, under the sky.

In the introduction, the author states that she was furnished with a chest of archives. One would think that if you have this immense wealth of information at your fingertips - that you could formulate a more enhanced story which is in desperate need of a dose of excitement. Perhaps some more research would have added that missing ingredient to this `book of accounts and ledgers'. Please note: before this book, I read "The Pope's Daughter", by Caroline Murphy which was very different. "The Pope's Daughter" (set in relatively the same time frame) was a fast paced novel-type adventure packed with all the scandalous and riveting tales one would expect from this particular period. I recommend it highly for anyone interested in the times of the Renaissance. It's tough not to compare these 2 books. I have subsequently purchased Caroline's other book, "Murder of a Medici Princess" which I haven't read yet, but will do shortly...
Nawenadet
This is a good account of the life in the 16th. Century in Italy. It shows la dolce vita of a Cardinal, much like the good life of the riches of today. No social mobility. There were big advances since that time, but in the 21st. Century we are returning to the times of a few riches and many poor. Middle class is disappearing. The details make this book a very interesting reading.
This Cardinal Ippolito d'Este was a son of Lucrezia Borgia, a daughter of Pope Alexander VI, probably the most corrupted pope in the history of the Church. Although from Ferrara, Ippolito had a magnificent palazzo - Villa d'Este - in Tivoli, a few miles from Rome.
I recommend this book to whomever plans to visit Ferrara and Villa d'Este. Most of the marble utilized in the palazzo was taken from nearby Hadrian's Villa.
Iaiastta
This is a most remarkable piece of archival research that recreates the everyday life of a 16th-century Italian aristocrat as he and his family pursue his goal of attaining for him the rank of cardinal in the wholly worldly and corrupt Catholic Church of that era. Using an enormous trove of documents she stumbled upon in the archives of Modena, Hollingsworth brings to vivid and detailed life the world of Ippolito d' Este, one of the sons of the notorious Lucrezia Borgia and her last husband, Duke Alfonso d'Este of Ferrara.

In the hands of the wrong writer, this kind of research could be deadly dull--little more than an endless 16th-century shopping list. But in Hollingsworth's hands these "dry" documents come to life, and take the reader into the day-to-day, material world of Ippolito d'Este as no other form of research could do. This is history that takes us from politics and power-seeking all the way to the level of perfumed gloves and crystal urinals, a world of mind-boggling aristocratic affluence and luxury.

The author's writing style, which some might consider a bit dull, is appropriate for her subject, in the sense that Ippolito needs no editorializing-- his documents themselves speak louder than anything the author could say about them. In any case, the writing is always competent, and often enlivened with flashes of dry British humor. Her ability to make sense of endless pages of accounts-- and to make the contents of those account books of interest to a modern reader-- is nothing short of masterful.

My only criticism is that, among all the illustrations, there doesn't seem to be a single one of Ippolito himself.
Marelyne
Quite absorbing for someone who relates to that period of the Renaissance and for those who are explorers of the true history of the Catholic Church.
Golden Lama
Hollingsworth's book focuses on the daily life of Borgia prince, Ippolito D'Este. Hollingsworth follows the events and geo-political gamesmanship that are hallmarks of the time. She has a wonderful ability to transform the minutiae into a lively account that reads quickly. I was very impressed with the thoroughness of her research, in particular, the way she was able to weave the concurrent actions of the court into the story. However, I was dismayed at how quickly the book came to a conclusion. Perhaps Hollingsworth is saving the second half of Ippolito's life for a sequel.

I read this book after reading Christopher Hibbert's "Borgia's and their Enemies" and think it is a wonderful follow-up. Thanks to this book, I am looking even more forward to the next book in the subject and continuing the story of the Borgias and their progeny.
Yla
GOOD BUT ALITTLE TEDIOUS