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by Richard Davenport-Hines,Hugh Trevor-Roper

Download Letters from Oxford: Hugh Trevor-Roper to Bernard Berenson ePub
  • ISBN 0297850849
  • ISBN13 978-0297850847
  • Language English
  • Author Richard Davenport-Hines,Hugh Trevor-Roper
  • Publisher Orion Publishing; First Edition edition (September 28, 2007)
  • Pages 368
  • Formats docx txt mbr lrf
  • Category Biography
  • Subcategory Historical
  • Size ePub 1543 kb
  • Size Fb2 1854 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 440

In 1947, 33-year-old historian Hugh Trevor-Roper and 82-year-old world-famous art critic Bernard Berenson met for the first time. Trevor-Roper promised to write to Berenson, and his letters continued until his friend, frail but still intensely curious about the world, died in 1959. Elegantly constructed, beautifully and precisely written, Trevor-Roper's correspondences are shot through with high-octane malice, sharp judgments, blistering comments, and many wonderfully funny episodes. From meeting Communist dignitaries behind the Iron Curtain to speeding in his glamorous gray Bentley to visit duchesses in the Scottish borders, this collection sets a tone of amusement at the "human comedy"—the vanity, snobbery, intrigue, and human weakness that Trevor-Roper saw all around him.


Hugh Redwald Trevor-Roper, Baron Dacre of Glanton, FBA (15 January 1914 – 26 January 2003), was a British historian of early modern Britain and Nazi Germany. He was Regius Professor of Modern History at the University of Oxford

Hugh Redwald Trevor-Roper, Baron Dacre of Glanton, FBA (15 January 1914 – 26 January 2003), was a British historian of early modern Britain and Nazi Germany. He was Regius Professor of Modern History at the University of Oxford. Trevor-Roper was a polemicist and essayist on a range of historical topics, but particularly England in the 16th and 17th centuries and Nazi Germany.

Trevor-Roper first met the famous art connoisseur and critic Bernard Berenson in 1947. In long letters written over 12 years, until Berenson's death in October 1959, Trevor-Roper was able to satisfy him on both counts. Berenson, at 82, was immured at I Tatti, the villa outside Florence which he had transformed into an immaculate shrine to his artistic taste, living with his companion Nicky Mariano; Trevor-Roper, driving around Tuscany in the Bentley he had bought from the proceeds of The Last Days of Hitler, was a historian at Christ Church, Oxford.

When Trevor-Roper reportedly had second thoughts within days, Murdoch . Davenport-Hines praises Trevor-Roper as the equal of Horace Walpole, but he seems more like Waugh in asperity.

When Trevor-Roper reportedly had second thoughts within days, Murdoch, determined to publish, responded: 'Fuck Dacre!' It is hard to picture Lord Dacre, as he had by then become, experiencing doubt. Witness his diary entry of a visit from Trevor-Roper and his mistress to the Berenson villa outside Florence. The pity is that, unlike Waugh, he had so little sense of humour.

This book consists of letters written by Trevor-Roper to the art expert and proprietor of I Tatti Bernard Berenson between 1947 and 1960.

8 people found this helpful. This book consists of letters written by Trevor-Roper to the art expert and proprietor of I Tatti Bernard Berenson between 1947 and 1960. However, the meat of the matter are the letters themselves, skillfully annotated and accompanied by some wonderful photographs, and presented in pleasant format in this volume.

Letters from Oxford book . Start by marking Letters from Oxford: Hugh Trevor-Roper to Bernard Berenson as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Trevor-Roper promised to write to Berenson, and his letters continued until his friend, frail but still intensely curious about the world, died in 1959. Elegantly constructed, beautifully and precisely written, Trevor-Roper's correspondences are In 1947, 33-year-old historian Hugh Trevor-Roper and 82-year-old world-famous art critic Bernard Berenson met for the first time.

Trevor-Roper's initial endorsement of the alleged Hitler diaries raised questions in the public mind not only about his . Letters from Oxford: Hugh Trevor-Roper to Bernard Berenson". Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2006, ISBN 0-297-85084-9.

Letters from Oxford: Hugh Trevor-Roper to Bernard Berenson". "Europe’s Physician: The Various Life of Sir Theodore De Mayerne", 2007, ISBN 0-300-11263-7.

Hugh Trevor-Roper, one of the most famous historians of his generation, was born in 1914

Hugh Trevor-Roper, one of the most famous historians of his generation, was born in 1914. He worked in the Secret Intelligence Service 1939-45. In 1945 he was sent to investigate the evidence for Hitler's death and in 1947 published his most famous book, THE LAST DAYS OF HITLER. He taught history at Christ Church from 1946 until 1957 when Harold Macmillan appointed him Regius Professor of Modern History at Oxford. He was Master of Peterhouse, Cambridge, 1980-87.

Hugh Redwald Trevor-Roper, who became a life peer as Lord Dacre of Glanton in 1989, was born on 15 January 1914. The son of a country doctor in Northumberland, he was educated at Charterhouse and then at Christ Church, Oxford, where he read first for a degree in Classics and then for one in History. The letters to Berenson cover the years 1947 to 1959. An appendix reproduces two letters on Oxford elections to Wallace Notestein.

When they met in 1947 Trevor-Roper, a young historian at Christ Church, Oxford, was 33. Berenson, the world-famous art critic, was 82, frail but still intensely curious about the world. Trevor Roper promised to write to him and his letters continued until Berenson's death in in 1959.

Talk about Letters from Oxford: Hugh Trevor-Roper to Bernard Berenson


Blackstalker
Those who appreciate smoothly elevated language, as put down here by a very lively English scholar in private correspondence to an elderly friend from the art world of Italy, will greatly enjoy this book.

Flashes of insights on random subjects, biting descriptions of the petty politics of universities, asides on some of the most famous people and controversies of the 1940s-50s, and well-turned phrases abound in this collection of letters.

(Richard Davenport-Hines deserves the praise Hugh Trevor-Roper gave another editor of a collection of letters: "... it is very well and learnedly edited.")
Ienekan
This is a wonderfully witty collection of letters written by one of the most distinguished British historians of the twentieth century, Hugh Trevor-Roper, to one of the most famous art historians of the twentieth century, Bernard Berenson, from the late 1940s to the end of the `50s, when the latter was ensconced in his famous villa outside Florence, i tatti, and the former was an Oxford don and then Regius Professor of Modern History. One gets only Trevor-Roper's letters, but enough background in the excellent introduction, very full (and readable) footnotes, and in quotations from Berenson's letters to understand what is happening without needing prior acquaintance with the two personalities or their worlds.

The letters are worth reading, above all, for Trevor-Roper's marvellous English prose style. He was a master of the letter-form, and always has something funny and insightful to say on a range of topics, in particular elections at Oxford, bus-trips in Persia, falling in love with a woman who is trying to divorce her husband, post-war Germany, and life in communist Russia. But he is at his best when he writes about contemporaries like A.H.Smith (Warden of New College, Oxford), A.J.P. Taylor, Evelyn Waugh, Maurice Bowra, and Isaiah Berlin, to name just a few in a large cast. The humour, and (let it be said) malice, which these sketches often contain make the book a real pleasure to read.
Ventelone
The late Hugh Trevor-Roper (1914-2003; later Baron Dacre of Glanton) was everything you want in an Oxford don: deeply learned; possessed of a wicked sense of humor; extremely clever (in the British sense of the term); sporting a period of service in the Secret Intelligence Service during the war (out of which grew his "The Last Days of Hitler"); but above all one of the finest letter writers one is likely ever to encounter (on a par with Justice Holmes and Isaiah Berlin). This book consists of letters written by Trevor-Roper to the art expert and proprietor of I Tatti Bernard Berenson between 1947 and 1960.

The letters are edited and introduced by Richard Davenport-Hines, and his substantial introduction to the volume is one of its finest features. However, the meat of the matter are the letters themselves, skillfully annotated and accompanied by some wonderful photographs, and presented in pleasant format in this volume. Also included as appendices are several letters that Trevor-Roper wrote to the American historian Wallace Notestein. A couple points bear emphasis. While there are no letters as such from Berenson, occasionally there are some excerpts included to set the stage for Trevor-Roper's letters to follow. I was very surprised to see that Berenson was far more knowledgeable in fields outside art history than I had imagined; in fact, he was quite conversant with the main themes of European and American intellectual history. Another point is that for those of us interested in (and puzzled by) the inner workings of the University of Oxford and its component colleges, these letters are a treasurehouse of information. Trevor-Roper delighted in academic fisticuffs and delighted even more in explaining these strange rituals to outsiders such as Berenson. However, not all the letters are fun and games; some show Trevor-Roper at work as an historian, including dispute with some major figures such as J. Hexter, Christopher Hill, Tawney, and above all Lawrence Stone. So, from every vantage point, just as enjoyable a collection of letters as one will ever happen upon.
black coffe
Snobbery, bitchy gossip and selective anti-semitism served up in a style that screams its own cleverness: the letters of an under-performing Oxford don to a once seminal art historian who peddled his expertise to shady dealers and rich collectors for fees which enabled him to set himself up in a baronial Florentine villa; there he received everyone he thought to be anyone, with special attention to flatterers like Trevor-Roper and to pretty young women who suffered being pawed by an elfin old lech. The editor's notes make it worth the price. I Tatti Survivor --