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Download A Court in Exile: The Stuarts in France, 1689-1718 ePub

by Edward Corp,Edward Gregg,Howard Erskine-Hill,Geoffrey Scott

Download A Court in Exile: The Stuarts in France, 1689-1718 ePub
  • ISBN 0521584620
  • ISBN13 978-0521584623
  • Language English
  • Author Edward Corp,Edward Gregg,Howard Erskine-Hill,Geoffrey Scott
  • Publisher Cambridge University Press; First Edition edition (January 19, 2004)
  • Pages 402
  • Formats lrf mobi azw mbr
  • Category Biography
  • Subcategory Historical
  • Size ePub 1365 kb
  • Size Fb2 1678 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 385

This study of "a court in exile" covers all aspects of the grandeur of court life. When King James II was deposed during the "Glorious Revolution" of 1688-89, he came with his family to France, where his cousin, Louis XIV allowed him to establish a large court-in-exile in the Château of Saint-Germain near Versailles. The book describes the magnificent setting of the court, the way it was organized, and how the exiled courtiers lived. Particular attention is given to the close relationships between the British and French royal families.

Through Edward Corp's beautifully produced book. With the publication of this book, the exiled Stuartcourt of 1689-1718 is the most fully described of all Stuart courts. Eric N. Lindquist, University of Maryland an excellent an. .

Through Edward Corp's beautifully produced book. we can appreciate once again just how impressive St. Germain was in its heyday. It is the pathetic end of the court of St. Germain that most people remember, but Corp and his contributors have done a superb job of reminding us that for almost three decades the Jacobite dream was one of glittering opportunity rather than a nightmare of poverty and defeat. Lindquist, University of Maryland an excellent and lavishly illustrated book.

This book takes a completely fresh look at the Stuart court in France during the years .

This book takes a completely fresh look at the Stuart court in France during the years when the Jacobite movement posed its greatest threat to the post-revolution governments in London. The book also shows how the Stuart court in France came to an end, and explains why and how it has since been so badly misrepresented. Edward Gregg, Howard Erskine-Hill, Professor of Literary History Faculty of English Howard Erskine-Hill, Geoffrey Scott.

Edward Corp's fascinating, well written, and thorough examination of the .

Edward Corp's fascinating, well written, and thorough examination of the Stuart court in exile after the Glorious Revolution of 1688 presents a special case that casts light on many of the issues raised above. Corp is the majordomo of studies of the later Stuarts at the palace of St. Germain en Laye. The excellent chapter by Howard Erskine Hill on poetry at St. Germain opens up considerable new territory. It might have been paired, however, with a chapter on the novelist Jane Barker, whose works have recently gained a great deal of attention from literary scholars.

Corp, Edward T. Publication, Distribution, et. Cambridge, . Personal Name: Stuart, House of. Geographic Name: Great Britain Court and courtiers History 18th century. Geographic Name: Great Britain Court and courtiers History 17th century.

A Court in Exile book. This study of "a court in exile" covers all aspects of the grandeur of court life. When King James II was deposed during the "Glorious Revolution" of 1688-89, he came with his family to France, where his cousin, Louis XIV allowed him to establish a large court-in-exile in the Chateau of Saint-Germain near Versailles. The book describes the magnificent setting of the court, This study of "a court in exile" covers all aspects of the grandeur of court life.

A Court in Exile: The Stuarts in France, 1689-1718 (Paperback) The Art Book 'Howard Erskine-Hill is the most formidable literary historian in their ranks.

A Court in Exile: The Stuarts in France, 1689-1718 (Paperback). Edward Corp (author), Edward Gregg (author of contributions), Howard Erskine-Hill (author of contributions), Geoffrey Scott (author of contributions). Edward Corp's fine book illuminates many dark corners of what has too long been a neglected area of historical discourse. The Tablet 'Edward Corp's fascinating, well written, and thorough examination of the Stuart court in exile after the Glorious Revolution of 1688 presents a special case that casts light on many of the issues. The Art Book 'Howard Erskine-Hill is the most formidable literary historian in their ranks.

This study of "a court in exile" covers all aspects of the grandeur of court life. When King James II was deposed during the "Glorious Revolution" of 1688-89, he came with his family to France, where his cousin, Louis XIV allowed him to establish a large court-in-exile in the Château of Saint-Germain near Versailles. The book describes the magnificent setting of the court, the way it was organized, and how the exiled courtiers lived.

Talk about A Court in Exile: The Stuarts in France, 1689-1718


Mbon
A Court in Exile offers a revisionist view of the Jacobite community at St. Germain-en-Laye, west of Paris. Guests of King Louis XIV, King James II and Queen Mary of Modena established their court in exile at the Old Chateau in 1689, and the court remained there until the death of the last Catholic queen of England during the "reign" of James III.

The revisionist aspect of this study corrects the Whig view that this court in exile was dismal, poor, and inconsequential. With the assistance of three colleagues--Edward Gregg, Howard Erskine-Hill, and Geoffrey Scott--Edward Corp traces the history of the courts of the Kings Over the Water through the Jacobite attempts to regain the throne, the relationships between Louis XIV and James II and between Louis and James III, and the transitions between St. Germain to Lorraine to Avignon to Rome after France recognized the Georgian succession in England and James III could not remain in France.

To reassess the court of St. Germain-en-Laye, the author and his three contributors describe the organization of the household and the court, its finances and its relationship to the court and government of France, the practice of the arts of portraiture, poetry, music, opera, and theatre, the education of James III, and the devotional life of James II.

Father Geoffrey Scott addresses this last topic, recounting the faithful piety of James II, influenced by both Jesuit and Salesian spirituality. James came to regard his expulsion from the throne as just punishment for his infidelities and affairs, especially those occurring after his conversion to Catholicism. He assiduously attended daily Mass and practiced many devotions (attending Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament and Benediction, Forty Hours, and the Canonical hours of prayer), counseling his son and heir to remain absolutely true to the Roman Catholic Church. At the same time, James II certainly offered religious freedom to his Anglican supporters at Court, even though Louis XIV forbade them to hold religious services. James III continued his father's practice, free to hire Anglican chaplains at his courts after the death of Louis.

James III's education highlights the divisions between Jesuit and Jansenists in France at the time; his formation was definitely in view of his succession to the throne, emphasizing character, linguistic facility, and proper deportment.

After both James III and Mary of Modena left St. Germain (and Corp explains how much a catalyst the death of Princess Louise-Marie in 1712 was in this regard) the Jacobite community did suffer from penury and neglect. As Corp notes, this is the image the Whig school used to depict the earlier Court, quite unjustly in his view.

Sometimes the details seem almost superfluous, as when Corp analyses and diagrams the arrangement of rooms and the location of the court and household staff--but the details are indeed important to depict the munificence of the Court. Both James II and James III maintained these Courts in the expectation of their return as rightful monarchs of England, and that hope was demonstrated by Court etiquette and organization until those expectations met their ultimate failure.

I regret the paucity of portraiture and the black and white reproductions of the portraits included. A map of France and a map of Europe and England at the time would also have been helpful to understand the movements of James III from St. Germain-en-Laye to Lorraine to Avignon to the Papal States. Those minor regrets aside, this book provides excellent context and significance to a comparatively unfamiliar circumstance in English history--a Court in Exile awaiting return.
net rider
A very fascinating read. Well researched and an excellent history of the Stuarts in Exile. Highly recommend!