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Download The Memoirs of Field-Marshal Kesselring (English and German Edition) ePub

by Albert Kesselring

Download The Memoirs of Field-Marshal Kesselring (English and German Edition) ePub
  • ISBN 0891413537
  • ISBN13 978-0891413530
  • Language English German
  • Author Albert Kesselring
  • Publisher Presidio Pr; First Thus edition (April 1, 1989)
  • Pages 319
  • Formats mobi mbr lit azw
  • Category Biography
  • Subcategory Leaders and Notable People
  • Size ePub 1498 kb
  • Size Fb2 1288 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 495

Covers the entire military career of one of World War II's great commanders.

Field Marshal Albert Kesselring was one of Germany’s most capable military . The Memoirs of Field-Marshal Wilhelm Keitel: Chief Of The German High Command, 1938-1945.

Field Marshal Albert Kesselring was one of Germany’s most capable military strategists. Originally a Bavarian army officer. Similar authors to follow.

Электронная книга "The Memoirs of Field-Marshal Kesselring", Albert Kesselring. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Memoirs of Field-Marshal Kesselring" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Originally a Bavarian Army officer, he transferred to the Luftwaffe in 1935 and became Goering’s deputy, commanding air fleets during the invasion of France and the Battle of Britain. In 1941 he was appointed C-in-C South, sharing the direction of the North African campaign with Rommel. Field Marshal Albert Kesselring was one of Germany’s most capable military strategists

Field Marshal Albert Kesselring was one of Germany’s most capable military strategists. Field Marshal Albert Kesselring was one of Germany’s most capable military strategists

English: general field marshal, field marshal general, or field marshal; listen ; abbreviated to Feldmarschall) was a rank in the armies of several German states and the Holy Roman Empire (schall); in the Ha. .

English: general field marshal, field marshal general, or field marshal; listen ; abbreviated to Feldmarschall) was a rank in the armies of several German states and the Holy Roman Empire (schall); in the Habsburg Monarchy, the Austrian Empire and Austria-Hungary, the rank Feldmarschall was used.

Kesselring, Albert The Memoirs of Field-Marshal.

ISBN 13: 9780891413530.

Field-Marshal Albert Kesselring was one of Germany’s most capable military strategists. Originally a Bavarian army officer, he transferred to the Luftwaffe in 1935 and became Göring’s deputy, commanding air fleets during the invasion of France and the Battle of Britain. In 1941, he was appointed Commander-in-Chief South, sharing the direction of the North African campaign with Rommel. As Commander-in-Chief in Italy in 1943 to 1944, his brilliant defense of the peninsula became legendary. In 1945, after the Ardennes offensive failed, Kesselring replaced von Rundstedt as Commander-in-Chief West.

Albert Kesselring, field marshal who, as German commander in chief, south, became one of Adolf Hitler’s top defensive strategists during World War I. The Memoirs of Field Marshal Kesselring ).

Albert Kesselring, field marshal who, as German commander in chief, south, became one of Adolf Hitler’s top defensive strategists during World War II. The son of a town education officer, Kesselring joined the army as a cadet in 1904.

Folkscanomy: A Library of Books. Additional Collections. Uploaded by MarcMichael1977 on February 20, 2017.

Irving, David - In the Service of the Reich - The Memoirs of Field-Marshal Keitel (EN, 340 . Addeddate. Folkscanomy: A Library of Books.

The Memoirs of Bob Hope's and Henry Kissinger's Mind-Controlled Slave. Memoirs of the Second World War: An Abridgement of the Six volumes of the Second World War With an Epilogue by the Author on the Postwar Years With MAPS and DIAGRAMS.

Краткий справочник по электронике. The Memoirs of Bob Hope's and Henry Kissinger's Mind-Controlled Slave. Sir Winston Churchill.

Talk about The Memoirs of Field-Marshal Kesselring (English and German Edition)


Keath
A highly recommended read for anyone interested in WW2 military history, a must read for military history buffs. He does a great job of taking one through the nuances of German military leadership excellence as well as how tradition & training influenced himself. Good insight into the beginning of the modern Luftwaffe & its influence on the panzer attack strategy. Kesselring’s leadership and later defensive skills are well known, however given the political constraints & the later Italian collapse, it is even more appreciated. An interesting prospective on the African theater and comments on Rommel as well as others are valuable insight. Perhaps some self-serving, but his treatment after the war was both unfair & detrimental to the recovery of Europe.
Gelgen
His troops called him "Smiling Albert", but his enemies considered him something between a strategic mastermind and a bloodthirsty war criminal. Hitler considered him too honest for his own good, and everybody knew he was tough. In 1944, when his staff car collided with the business end of a howitzer, a joke circulated among his armies during his convalescence: "The Field Marshal was only slightly injured, but the gun had to be retired." Such was Albert Kesselring, General Field Marshal of the Luftwaffe and one of the few of that rank to leave his memiors behind.

Kesselring had one of those military careers that is actually several careers in one -- army officer, air force general, theater commander. Considering his many achievements, he should probably be more famous, but it was his fate to be the "other field marshal" in the Southern Theater - the principle one being, of course, Rommel, with whom Kesselring often bitterly quarreled. Indeed, it was Kesselring's relations with men like Hitler, Goering, and Rommel that I was arguably looking most forward to reading about - among other things. And therin lies the problem. It turned out there were too many "other things" in MEMIORS. Kesselring was attempting too much. His life story is simply too damned big to cram into a single volume. Considering the vital importance he played in the development of the Luftwaffe, the French campaign, the Battle of Britain, the invasion of Russia, the war in North Africa and the defense of Sicily and Italy, it would have been better to split this into a two or even a three-volume series.

The problem of biting off more of his life than he could chew was exacerbated by the fact that he wrote these pages wholly or partially while imprisoned for war crimes, and thus had very limited access to research materials - he seems to be operating from memory, and from postwar literature produced by his ex-enemies. Finally, Kesselring's writing style, while not precisely bad and showing flashes of talent here and there, isn't what you would call aesthetically pleasing. Having read a lot of German military literature to use as comparison, I would rate him in the bottom half of the ex-generals: he often generalizes when he should speak specifically, and sometimes bogs down in details when he should have spoken broadly.

I also have some issues with the book itself. The pictures are low quality -, grainy, dot-matrix style, and the translation from German to British English leaves something to be desired. Ranks are incorrectly translated on many occasions and some of the sentences have that unweildy, unnatural quality that an overly literal translation tends to create. There are also some misspellings, and a comment or two in the forward which is/are downright nonsensical.

MEMIORS are by no means all bad. Kesselring's career is breath-taking in its sheer scope, and his criticisms of Allied battle strategies, the cumbersome and inefficient leadership structure of Hitler's armed forces, and the Axis failure to seize Malta (which cost them the North African war) are all fascinating. His diplomatic criticisms of Rommel shed interesting light on the less pleasing aspects of that legendary soldier. Furthermore, in defending himself against charges of war crimes in Italy, he makes a number of valid points about the hypocrisy of the Allies, who encouraged and facilitated the brutal partisan movement knowing full well how the Germans would respond to it, and then used ex post facto laws to prosecute German leaders after the war.

MEMIORS are most definitely not a smooth and easy read. In some ways they is not even as well-written as Field Marshal Keitel's death row memiors, which were cut short by his execution at Nuremberg. But they are an important contribution to war literature.
elegant stranger
This was an interesting book to read the view of much of WWII in Europe from one of Germany's best generals. I learned a lot that was not available in many other books of the war. This was written while he was incarcerated by the Allies after the surrender. I was hoping for more in depth discussions of various parts of the war in Italy and France/Germany during the invasion years but most of the book contained general descriptions, opinion and reactions about what transpired rather than in depth analysis and details about his involvement and how the German forces performed against the Allies. All in all it was a good book and I do recommend it.
Yayrel
Field Marshal Kesselring was a senior Wehrmacht leader during WWII who was commander of Axis efforts in the Mediterranean at one point. His memoirs avoid some subjects of discussion and glosses over others. It would have been helpful if the book was annotated to explain some of the items being discussed, to clarify in footnotes perhaps. Kesselring seems to have identified the key to defeating the British in North Africa (Malta) but it seems to me he never really discusses the proposed invasion or the suppression of the island at length. Kesselring does seem to have been aware that there was some sort of security leak in the Axis effort in Africa but when this was initially published he had no way of knowing about Ultra, the Allied system which allowed them to read at least some military messages.
Marilbine
Field Marshall Kesselring was, in the opinion of many, one of the top three military leaders that Germany produced during WW 2. Although Kesselring was a field marshal, he wore many hats and was not the publicity seeker as was Rommel. Kesselring was the only major military leader to hold one of Germany's highest military positions from the start of the war to the finish.

Kenneth Macksey takes an in-depth look at Kesselring, the great tactician who must be ranked among some of the other great tacticians of that period such as Gudrian, Model,, and Von Manstein.
Kemath
Brilliant memoir from one of Germany's greatest generals. I'm reading it, and I'm amazed to see how clear and honest his view of the war is.
If you want to see how war is conducted at the highest levels, pick this up. Well done and a true classic of military history.
Trash
I found Kesselrings memoirs very informative, and a good counterpoint to studies of the Sicilian/Italian campaigns written by others. I found his observations of Hitler's handling of the military akin to others by other German generals.
Kesselring provides great insight into German military thinking in the 1930s and 1940s. He was one of toughest Allied adversaries.