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Download Saint Among Savages: The Life of St. Isaac Jogues ePub

by Francis Talbot

Download Saint Among Savages: The Life of St. Isaac Jogues ePub
  • ISBN 089870913X
  • ISBN13 978-0898709131
  • Language English
  • Author Francis Talbot
  • Publisher Ignatius Press (October 1, 2002)
  • Pages 380
  • Formats docx lit mbr mobi
  • Category Biography
  • Subcategory Leaders and Notable People
  • Size ePub 1988 kb
  • Size Fb2 1411 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 181

"I go, but I shall never come back again." These were Isaac Jogues' words on the eve of embarking for a second missionary attempt in America. Shortly afterward, a skull-splitting Mohawk tomahawk made him a martyr.

Fresh from the elegant life of Renaissance France, Jesuit priest Isaac Jogues landed in the savage wilderness of America in 1636. He came fervent in his priestly zeal to devote his life to Christianizing and civilizing the Indian nations that stalked the trackless forests -- savages he was prepared to love, sight unseen, for the love of God. He lived among the Hurons enduring hunger, thirst, disease, and humiliation at their hands.

A vast canvas unrolls in this suspenseful and swift-moving story of heroic sacrifice in the earliest days of New York and Canada. Against a background of bloody wars between great Indian nations and between the savages and the first European settlers in America passes the magnificent figure of the Jesuit, Isaac Jogues, intrepid pioneer, adventurer, victim of horrific cruelties, and saint. This is a story of violent action and great sacrifice that testifies to the faith and heroism of Isaac Jogues and his fellow martyrs.


Saint Among Savages book. Fresh from the elegant life of Renaissance France, Jesuit priest Isaac Jogues landed in the savage wilderness of America in 1636. He came Francis Talbot, .

Saint Among Savages book. I go, but I shall never come back again. These were Isaac Jogues' words on the eve of embarking for a second missionary attempt in America. Shortly afterward, a skull-splitting Mohawk tomahawk made him a martyr.

Francis Xavier Talbot (January 25, 1889 – December 3, 1953) was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit who was active in Catholic literary and publishing circles, and . Saint Among Savages: The Life of Isaac Jogues. New York: Harper & Brothers.

Francis Xavier Talbot (January 25, 1889 – December 3, 1953) was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit who was active in Catholic literary and publishing circles, and became the President of Loyola College in Maryland. Born in Philadelphia, he entered the Society of Jesus in 1906, and was educated at St. Andrew-on-Hudson and Woodstock College.

10 January 1607 – 18 October 1646) was a missionary and martyr who traveled and worked among the Iroquois, Huron, and other Native populations in North America. He was the first European to name Lake George, calling it Lac du Saint Sacrement (Lake of the Blessed Sacrament). In 1646, Jogues was martyred by the Mohawk at their village of Ossernenon, north of the Mohawk River.

These were Isaac Jogues words on the eve of embarking for a second missionary attempt in America. St Isaac Jogues' heroism, holiness, perseverance and indomitable courage, in the midst of the Native Americans, shine out in a well-told story.

St Isaac Jogues' heroism, holiness, perseverance and indomitable courage, in the midst of the Native Americans, shine out in a well-told story.

Saint Among Savages: The Life of St. Isaac Jogues. This book tells of the amazing dedication to both God and man. The true story of the mystic Jesuit Saint, who sacrificed his everything for the native people of North America, and for the greater glory of God. Well written, both entertaining and educational, it's a shame this book is no longer in print. Well worth the read for either the history buff, or the religious.

author {Alban W. Hoopes}, year {1936} }. Alban W. Hoopes.

Ships to San Leandro, 1919 Davis S. Kessinger Publishing is the place to find hundreds of thousands of rare and hard-to-find books with something of interest for everyone!

Ships to San Leandro, 1919 Davis St. More delivery & pickup options. Sold & shipped byWalmart. Kessinger Publishing is the place to find hundreds of thousands of rare and hard-to-find books with something of interest for everyone! Specifications. Kessinger Publishing.

the life of Isaac Jogues. by Francis X. Talbot. Published 1961 by Image Books in Garden City, . Isaac Jogues Saint (1607-1646). Includes bibliography. Doubleday Image book - D112.

St On June 29, 1930, St. Isaac Jogues and his companion martyrs were enrolled among the saints by Pope Pius XI.

Isaac Jogues was born at Orleans, France on January 10, 1607 and was ordained to the priesthood, July 2, 1636, as a member of the Society of Jesus. On June 29, 1930, St. St. Isaac and his companions, The North American Martyrs. In 1636 he was sent to Quebec, Canada, as a missionary to the Huron Indians. He was tortured and imprisoned by the Iroquois in 1642.

Saint Isaac Jogues, . Indian children Saint Among Savages - The Life of Saint Isaac Jogues. Shrine of Our Lady of Martyrs. Religious, priest, missionary and martyr. However, some among the Mohawks regarded Jogues as a practitioner of magic, and when the double-calamity of sickness and crop failure hit the Mohawks, Jogues was the easiest thing to blame their now prevalent problems on. On October 18, 1646, he and LaLande were tomahawked in the neck (beheaded-not clubbed as some tell the story). Saint Among Savages - The Life of Saint Isaac Jogues. National Shrine of North American Martyrs.

Talk about Saint Among Savages: The Life of St. Isaac Jogues


Hallolan
This book is one of the best I have ever read. I have read it perhaps six or seven times since discovering it in a library in 1970. We should not wonder that Europeans, in the forbidding land of North America in the 17th century, should have thought of Indians(not called Native Americans til much later) as savages. We must, we have no other choice, we must judge people by the times in which they lived. Not by 2008 standards, low as they are. Otherwise we will find ourselves involved in absurdities such as wondering why the Vikings did not advocate sensitiviy training. This book is about a courageous young priest whose only interest in North America was to bring these Hurons and Iroquois to God. He was misunderstood by the Iroquois and died because of it. But the book is absolutely fascinating and brings to complete life the times in which Jogues lived. Reading this, you can get into the canoe with the young Jesuit and travel with him and others on long journeys. It is a vivid rendering of what it was like to live in absolute wilderness and ministering to people who did not want you anywhere near them. What a story and what an inspiration. Any time I think I have it bad, I think of Isaac Jogues and what he endured.
Friert
Highly recommend.
August
This account,written some 70 years ago by Jesuit Francis Talbot, brings out the best and most heroic aspects of Jesuit missionary work. Drawing mostly on careful records and reports left by the missionaries, it is an illustration of the courage of these well-educated men who left the comfort of the Old World to spread the Gospel to the Americam people.
The Jesuits were careful to respect the culture they found in the New World. Even before active evangelization, that was task number one. They learnt the language and studied the customs. Some of these customs dismayed the European missionaries, but they did not disturb these customs except when they were plainly self-destructive (cannabalism, wholesale promiscuity). They were not into mass baptisms for the sake of getting "numbers". If anything, they erred on the opposite side, making a careful and thorough examination of any individual before he would be admitted to Baptism. Exceptions were made for those dying.
Even after making allowances for the possibility that the author is acting as a cheerleader for the Jesuit mission enterprise, I could not but admire the bravery, the good sense, and the piety of these Frenchmen. especially the central figure, St. Isaac Jogues.
Although it is a point not stressed (or even mentioned) in the book, I was struck by the contrast between the French approach in encountering the native population, and the English approach. For the most part, the former treated the natives as real men and women with immortal souls. For the most part, the latter did not. The bitter fruit of the English approach is seen in the reservation sysyem. Give me the French traders and Jesuit missionaries any day!
TheSuspect
found my 6 th great grandfathers history in this book
Cildorais
This is an Excellent book in both its historic accounts of the times and a real taste of the bravado of St. Isaac Jogues!
Jek
This is a thoroughly researched and enthralling biography of what would have to be one of the most extraordinary lives of all time - the life of a highly educated Jesuit of the 17th century golden age of France, sent as a missionary to the native tribes in the jungles of America. St Isaac Jogues' heroism, holiness, perseverance and indomitable courage, in the midst of the Native Americans, shine out in a well-told story.
Tamesya
This is a reprint of a book first published in 1935. While it has historical information about Isaac Jogues, it comes packaged in the author's cultural baggage of another era. It is full of derogatory references to the native peoples as "savages," and lacks an appreciation of inculturation. Since Vatican II the Church has forged new directions in missiology and an awareness of culture in evangelization. Speaking to a group of native Americans, the pope himself has stated that "The early encounter between your traditional cultures and the European way of life...was a harsh and painful reality for your peoples. The cultural oppression, the injustices, the disruption of your life and of your traditional societies must be acknowledged..." (Speech in Phoenix, AZ, Sept. 14, 1987) This book presents quite a different picture. The heroism of the martyrs can only be admired. But it is ironic that they themselves practiced a form of inculturation far ahead of their time, and so they would presumably be in the vanguard of the Church's missionary outreach today. Publishing this book now can only do them a disservice, as it does to the native peoples whom they loved enough to give their lives for.