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Download Weren't No Good Times: Personal Accounts of Slavery in Alabama (Real Voices, Real History) ePub

by Horace Randall Williams

Download Weren't No Good Times: Personal Accounts of Slavery in Alabama (Real Voices, Real History) ePub
  • ISBN 0895872846
  • ISBN13 978-0895872845
  • Language English
  • Author Horace Randall Williams
  • Publisher Blair (February 1, 2004)
  • Pages 191
  • Formats txt azw lit lrf
  • Category Biography
  • Subcategory Leaders and Notable People
  • Size ePub 1822 kb
  • Size Fb2 1139 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 662

From 1936 to 1938, the Federal Writers’ Project (FWP), a part of the New Deal’s Works Progress Administration, hired writers, editors, and researchers to interview as many former slaves as they could find and document their lives during slavery. More than 2,000 former slaves in 17 states were interviewed. With Weren’t No Good Times, John F. Blair, Publisher, continues its Real Voices, Real History™ series with selections from 46 of the 125 interviews now archived in the Library of Congress that were earmarked as interviews with Alabama slaves. Also included is an excerpt from Thirty Years a Slave: From Bondage to Freedom, a memoir written by Louis Hughes. This selection reveals a different aspect of the Alabama slavery experience, because Hughes was hired out by his master to work at the Confederate salt works during the Civil War. Alabama was a frontier state and from the beginning, its economy was built on cotton and slavery. That its laws were fashioned to accommodate both becomes obvious when related through the experiences of Alabama’s slaves. A year after it obtained statehood, Alabama had a slave population of 41,879, as compared to 85,451 whites and 571 free blacks. By 1860, the slave population had swelled to 435,080, while there were 536,271 whites and 2,690 free blacks. When emancipation came to the slaves, Alabama’s slave owners lost an estimated $200 million of capital. These narratives will help readers understand slavery by hearing the voices of the people who lived it.

Horace Randall Williams describes himself as “among the last of Alabamians - black or white - who have memories of picking cotton by hand not for a few minutes to see how it felt but because I needed the few dollars I would get for a day’s hard labor under a hot sun,” an experience he says helped him recognize the cadences and dialect in the slave narratives. An Alabama native, he has researched and written extensively about civil rights, segregation, and slavery during three decades as a reporter, writer, editor, and publisher of newspapers, magazines, and books. He was the founder and, for many years, the director of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Klanwatch Project. He is the co-founder and editor-in-chief of NewSouth Books in Montgomery, Alabama. He recently authored 100 Things You Need to Know about Alabama.

"For a century and a half, these stories and the truths they disclose have been hidden from view. They are far too important to stay neglected and ignored. Williams has resurrected the last generation of America’s slaves and allowed them to speak in their own voices." - Elizabeth Breau Foreword Review


Horace Randall Williams describes himself as among the last of Alabamians - black or white - who have memories of. .If you are interested in the history of early (1860's)Alabama and the role of slavery in plantation life, this is a very good if brief introduction.

Horace Randall Williams describes himself as among the last of Alabamians - black or white - who have memories of picking cotton by hand not for a few minutes to see how it felt but because I needed the few dollars I would get for a day’s hard labor under a hot sun, an experience he says helped him recognize the cadences and dialect. in the slave narratives. An Alabama native, he was the founder and, for many years, the director of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Klanwatch Project.

Weren't No Good Times book . With Weren't No Good Times, John F. Blair, Publisher, continues its Real Voices, Real History(TM) series with selections from 46 of the 125 interviews now archived in the Library of Congress that were earmarked as interviews with Alabama slaves. This selection reveals a different aspect of the Alabama slavery experience, because Hughes was hired out by his master to work at the Confederate salt works during the Civil War.

With Weren't No Good Times, John F. Blair, Publisher, continues its Real Voices, Real History ? series with selections from 44 of the 125 interviews now archived in the Library of Congress that were earmarked as interviews with Alabama slaves. Alabama was a frontier state

With Weren't No Good Times, John F. Alabama was a frontier state. From the beginning, its economy was built on cotton and slavery and its laws were fashioned to accommodate both, which becomes obvious when related through the experiences of Alabama's slaves

Find nearly any book by Horace Randall Williams

Find nearly any book by Horace Randall Williams. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Founded in 1997, BookFinder.

Authentic voices of slavery are audible in this book: After I was free I didn’t had no marster to ’pend on and I was hongry a heap of times. I belong to the ‘federate nation an always will belong to yall, but I recon it’s jes as well we is free cause I don’t believe the white folks now days would make good marsters. Some slaves were owned by traders and treated like livestock. Others recall working during all daylight hours virtually every day of the year.

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During the antebellum period, Alabama politicians such as William Lowndes Yancey and J. L. M. Curry actively defended the right to expand slavery into . Curry actively defended the right to expand slavery into areas acquired by the United States through the Louisiana Purchase (1803) and Mexican War (1846-1848). Published: August 5, 2009 Last updated: August 22, 2017.

Horace Randall Williams describes himself as "among the last of Alabamians-black or white-who have memories of picking cotton .

Horace Randall Williams describes himself as "among the last of Alabamians-black or white-who have memories of picking cotton by hand not for a few minutes to see how it felt but because I needed the few dollars I would get for a day's hard labor under a hot su. He was the founder and for many years the director of the Southern Poverty Law Center's Klanwatch Project. Format Paperback 103 pages.

Number of Pages: 191. Genre: Biography + Autobiography. Series Title: Real Voices, Real History Series. Publisher: Blair - Blair.

The best-known narratives of slavery are those of Frederick Douglass and .

The best-known narratives of slavery are those of Frederick Douglass and other men. Even the photos most people have seen are of male slaves chained and beaten. So asks Rose Williams of Bell County, Texas, whose long-ago forced cohabitation remains as bitter at age 90 as when she was "just a ingnoramus chile" of 16. In all her years after freedom, she never had any desire to marry.

Talk about Weren't No Good Times: Personal Accounts of Slavery in Alabama (Real Voices, Real History)


Brakree
This book is the result of much thoughtful work by the editor in wading through the massive collection of information from the FWP (Federal Writers' Project - 1930's), and serves two purposes: it gives us the original language of people who actualy experienced slavery in this country, and it is an example of the many beneficial programs the government funded under the new deal to both give Americans jobs and to chronical our history.

A must-have for any Alabamian - or anyone for that matter - who is interested in the history of our counrty.
Jaberini
If you are interested in the history of early (1860's)Alabama and the role of slavery in plantation life, this is a very good if brief introduction.
hardy
Very revealing history. Reader can find the roots for some of today's social problems in the lives of slaves.
Levaq
An excellent read for those looking for true accounts of slavery by ex-slaves. I would recommend highly.