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Download A Dangerous Assignment: An Artillery Forward Observer in World War II (Stackpole Military History Series) ePub

by William B. Hanford

Download A Dangerous Assignment: An Artillery Forward Observer in World War II (Stackpole Military History Series) ePub
  • ISBN 0811734854
  • ISBN13 978-0811734851
  • Language English
  • Author William B. Hanford
  • Publisher Stackpole Books; First THUS edition (July 10, 2008)
  • Pages 272
  • Formats rtf docx mbr txt
  • Category Biography
  • Subcategory Leaders and Notable People
  • Size ePub 1436 kb
  • Size Fb2 1644 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 931

Rare memoir of a risky job performed by relatively few troopsHonest and observant narrative describes the good, bad, and ugly of the warCovers World War II's closing months in eastern France and Germany

Cpl. Bill Hanford had one of the U.S. Army's most dangerous jobs in World War II: artillery forward observer (FO). Tasked with calling in heavy fire on the enemy, FOs accompanied infantrymen into combat, crawled into no-man's-land, and ascended observation posts like hills and ridges to find their targets. But beyond the usual perils of ground combat, FOs were specially targeted by the enemy because of their crucial role in directing artillery fire. Hanford spent much of his time fighting in the Vosges Mountains in eastern France and then in Germany in late 1944 and early 1945.


William B. Hanford served as a forward observer in World War II with the . I enjoy books by World War Two veterans

William B. 103rd Infantry Division of the Seventh Army. A retired teacher, he lives in Howell, Michigan. I enjoy books by World War Two veterans. Especially those that deal with combat situations outside the usual front-line infantry soldier (though I enjoy those stories as well). This book is one of those stories. It describes the life of an artillery Forward Observer with the 103rd ID in Europe during the last months of World War Two.

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A Dangerous Assignment : An Artillery Forward Observer in World War II. by William B. Hanford. Rare memoir of a risky job performed by relatively few troops Honest and observant narrative describes the good, bad, and ugly of the war Covers World War II's closing months in eastern France and Germany Cpl. Bill Hanford had one of the . Army's most dangerous jobs in World War II: artillery forward observer (FO).

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By: William B. Publisher: Stackpole Books (NBN). Print ISBN: 9780811734851, 0811734854. The world’s eTextbook reader for students. VitalSource is the leading provider of online textbooks and course materials. eText ISBN: 9780811746366, 0811746364. More than 15 million users have used our Bookshelf platform over the past year to improve their learning experience and outcomes.

Items related to A Dangerous Assignment: An Artillery Forward Observer. Hanford spent much of his time fighting in the Vosges Mountains in eastern France and then in Germany in late 1944 and early 1945. From the Publisher: 15 b/w photos

Items related to A Dangerous Assignment: An Artillery Forward Observer. Home William B. Hanford A Dangerous Assignment: An Artillery Forward Observer in World. A Dangerous Assignment: An Artillery Forward Observer in World War II (Stackpole Military History Series). From the Publisher: 15 b/w photos.

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Coast Watching in World War II. Colossal Cracks. A Dangerous Assignment. Fist from the Sky. Flying American Combat Aircraft of World War II. For Europe. Forging the Thunderbolt. Destination Normandy. Dive Bomber! A Drop Too Many. The German Defeat in the East, 1944–45.

Dangerous assignment Hanford, William B. Неизвестно 9780811734851 : Corporal Bill Hanford had one of the US Army& most dangerous jobs in World War II: artillery . Dangerous assignment, Hanford, William B. Варианты приобретения. Неизвестно 9780811734851 : Corporal Bill Hanford had one of the US Army& most dangerous jobs in World War II: artillery forward observer (FO). Кол-во: Наличие: Поставка под заказ. Есть в наличии на складе поставщика. Склад Америка: 144 шт. При оформлении заказа до: 6 сен 2019 Ориентировочная дата поставки: начало октября При условии наличия книги у поставщика.

Talk about A Dangerous Assignment: An Artillery Forward Observer in World War II (Stackpole Military History Series)


Mullador
My father was a WW2 Field Artillery forward observer officer and I followed in his footsteps as a Vietnam era 1Lt F/O who served in Panama. This book is a great, well written and very informative historical read. As an enlisted man who lugged the heavy radio unit of the day in European battles, the author offers not great deal of technical information about the tactics and techniques of observed artillery fire, but much about the role and history of WW2 F/Os and the importance of small unit leadership. He tells all this in a very humble, low key, objective and honest way. I am very greatful for Mr. Handford's contribution to the history of WW2 and the histroical role of field artillery forward observers, I thank him for his honorable service to the USA, and highly commend this book to everyone interested in any of these subjects.
allegro
The author served with the 928th Field Artillery Battalion of the 103rd Infantry Division, fighting in the Vosges, Ardennes and Siegfried Line battles and on into Germany. His particular role is as radioman for Forward Observers and he subsequently sees a lot of action in the front line.

He is the first to admit that his role is not as consistently dangerous as that endured by the infantry but he does make quite a bit of the danger (hence the title I suppose). Indeed, his best friend is his unit's first fatality and it was interesting to read how this was met by a green unit. He is quite cynical it must be said but there is often a lot to be cynical about in the way armies do things. In any case, this allows him to explore one of his recurring themes, the relationships between officers and enlisted men and more specifically, the quality of his officers. While some were excellent, he also encounters glory-hounds, incompetents and outright bastards. The pressures of war and the hierarchal structure of the army (and society it came from) contribute to this but Hanford has a sense of grievance stronger than most veteran authors writing of similar experiences.

As for combat, Hanford is not called upon to use his rifle but he is shelled extensively, including by his own unit! It is estimated that artillery inflicted half of the casualties in WW2 and Handford's account spells out what this meant. The strongest section for me, was his account of supporting the G/411th Regt in its attacks in the Haardt Mountains against fixed defences. Machine gunners firing from strong bunkers, snipers and ground expertly exploited by the defenders shred the attackers, yet they are continually ordered to try again. It is sobering stuff.

In addition to Handford being spared such frontal assaults, he and his section also get a lot more time in billets. Often the residents are still on hand and he has considerable exposure to ordinary people. There are some interesting stories here, both in France and Germany. In the later, he sees some remarkable things at the end of the war before being transferred and shipped home for service against the Japanese. Fortunately, the war ends and he returns to civilian life. The last chapter or two cover his post war life, with some news on the lives of his war-time comrades.

This is a solid piece of war writing. Handford seems to have been part of the ATSP and is an educated writer. There is some dry humour at times and a distinct cynical tone regarding some facets of his service (but I can only remember one mild mention of politics, so I am not sure what those other reviewers are reacting to - I am not an American though, so maybe I'm missing something). Handford's story is interesting but, as terrible as his war was, it points to the even greater danger and discomfort of being in the infantry. In comparison to the many other memoirs I have now read, I give it three stars. It is certainly a worthwhile read (I rate hard) but have a look at my lists for others which I think are stronger.
Love Me
Being a teen age Sgt. WW-2 forward observer, it brings back vivid memories. Very much true to life and what we fought for, and what is being scoffed away in this day and age by senseless self-serving politicians. Read it and maybe you can realize what boys did to become men if not overnight, at least in a matter of weeks and with no thought for 'what's in it for me.'! I bought extra copies for circulating copies foe the survivors of our old 294th FAOB unit. All who have read it are highly impressed.
Scoreboard Bleeding
An excellent firsthand account, well written. I read this because my father was a forward observer and was with the 4th Division on D-Day. I wanted to gain an understanding of what life as a forward observer was like since I could never get anything much out of my father who is now deceased. I believe this book provided that.
Uriel
I enjoy books by World War Two veterans. Especially those that deal with combat situations outside the usual front-line infantry soldier (though I enjoy those stories as well). This book is one of those stories. It describes the life of an artillery Forward Observer with the 103rd ID in Europe during the last months of World War Two. He describes in detail the countryside, the combat, the misery and boredom, as well as the various officers that he came in contact with and their different personalities. Obviously, an incompetent officer could get you killed as fast as the enemy. I highly recommend this book. It should be required reading for anyone who is a military officer or plans to become one.
Delagamand
Fascinating reading about the experiences of a radioman for a forward observer team in World War Two. One outstanding problem, however, is that he doesn't remember any of the dates and some of the places where his artillery unit was engaged. This is troubling, because he seems to recall hundreds of conversations he had with his fellow GIs---and that's just impossible.
IGOT
The life of all Forward Observers in WWII was harrowing. Mr. Hanford might be understating his experiences or it may be a case that the amount of action an FO saw was dependent on the Division he was in. Some Divisions saw a lot more action than others. I compared this book, maybe unfairly, with my father's experiences as a FO with the 9th Infantry Division. My father saw action in Africa, Sicily, and the European theatres, first as an armorer in Africa and Sicily, then as a FO starting with his FO training in England and attachment (as an advance party for the 9th)to the 4th Infantry Division landing on D-Day. The recepient of a Purple Heart, 2 Bronze Stars (one for Valor), Theatre ribbon with 6 bronze stars,the Combat Infantryman's Badge, and more, my dad (and the 9th) apparently saw a lot more action than Mr Hanford and the division he was in. Unfortunately, most FOs invovled in a lot of active combat did not come home. We are proud of them all and thank them for serving.
Not finished but a good read.