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by Gizelle Hersh

Download Gizelle, Save the Children! ePub
  • ISBN 0896960544
  • ISBN13 978-0896960541
  • Language English
  • Author Gizelle Hersh
  • Publisher Dodd Mead or Everest House; 1st edition (October 1, 1980)
  • Pages 319
  • Formats lit doc lrf rtf
  • Category Biography
  • Size ePub 1628 kb
  • Size Fb2 1260 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 705

Tells the story of sixteen-year-old Gizelle Hersh and her three younger sisters who, by instinct, luck, and willpower, managed to stay together and survive the German death camps of World War II Hungary

Gizelle, save the children! These were the last words that. I have a morbid facination with the Holocaust

Gizelle, save the children! These were the last words that. I have a morbid facination with the Holocaust. This book was an emotional journey with four sisters who survived the concentration camps.

Gizelle Hersh's family lives in the Hungarian town of Bixad, a charming spa resort which is. .Haunted by her mother's final command to watch over her younger siblings and to save them, whatever happens, Gizelle does just that over the entire length of their internment.

Gizelle Hersh's family lives in the Hungarian town of Bixad, a charming spa resort which is now a part of Romania (the nation she and her four siblings were born in). In March of 1944, she is just like any other normal 17 year old young woman; she has a happy family, together with the usual disagreements with her siblings from time to time, she lives in a nice house and has a big wardrobe full of pretty clothes, she has been educated at the gymnasium in Szatmár, and she's in a happy.

Gizelle, Save the Children! Hardcover – October 1, 1980. Among the few people who show any kind of disagreement with what's going on are Yanos, the Hershes' grocer, and a man who slaps his little boy for shouting abuses at them as they're being transported to the ghetto in Szatmár. by. Gizelle Hersh (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Otherwise everyone just looked, many of them shouting and throwing stones. It made me sick to read about the little boy who shouted slurs at them and wiggled his fingers in his ears as they were all being marched to the death train, as his mother smiled at him fondly.

Gizelle, Save the Children! book. Gizelle Hersh, inspired by her mother's parting words, attempts to save her three younger sisters and a brother from death in the Auschwitz concentration camp at the close of World War II. Get A Copy.

Gizelle Save the Children. 5 people like this topic.

Giselle (French: Giselle, ou les Wilis ) is a romantic ballet in two acts, and is considered a masterwork in the classical ballet performance canon. It was first performed by the Ballet du Théâtre de l'Académie Royale de Musique at the Salle Le Peletier in Paris, France on 28 June 1841, with Italian ballerina Carlotta Grisi as Giselle. The ballet was an unqualified triumph. Giselle became hugely popular and was staged at once across Europe, Russia, and the United States.

The Save the Children Fund, commonly known as Save the Children was established in the United Kingdom in 1919 to improve the lives of children through better education, health care, and economic opportunities, as well as providing emergency aid in n.

The Save the Children Fund, commonly known as Save the Children was established in the United Kingdom in 1919 to improve the lives of children through better education, health care, and economic opportunities, as well as providing emergency aid in natural disasters, war, and other conflicts.

Gizelle is a cameo character as it appeared in minority (less than 50%) episodes of the show and sometimes appeared along with Grumpy in a fourth wall break ("Gnome Alone", "The Enchanted Shoes", "Starchy Takes a Break"). It's revealed by Grumpy in "Whose Voice is it Anyway?" that she was raised by bloodhounds, and it's also revealed by Doc that she had raised Dopey during his infancy.

Items related to Gizelle, Save the Children! /.All books securely packaged. Condition is guaranteed with all items shipped fully on approval

Items related to Gizelle, Save the Children!, Gizelle Hersh and Peggy. Home Hersh, Gizelle, Mann, Peggy Gizelle, Save the Children!, Gizelle Hersh and Peggy Mann. Tells the story of sixteen-year-old Gizelle Hersh and her three younger sisters who, by instinct, luck, and willpower, managed to stay together and survive the German death camps of World War II Hungary. Condition is guaranteed with all items shipped fully on approval.

Talk about Gizelle, Save the Children!


Larosa
Extraordinary book and extraordinary woman! G-d bless you Gizelle, and your sweet sisters. Thank you for sharing your story. We will never forget!
Arador
Excellent, excellent ....
Mojind
I have a morbid facination with the Holocaust. This book was an emotional journey with four sisters who survived the concentration camps. Very well written. One of my favorites.
Mysterious Wrench
It's a shame this book is out of print, since it's an important addition to the already-large canon of Shoah memoirs. Gizelle Hersh's family lives in the Hungarian town of Bixad, a charming spa resort which is now a part of Romania (the nation she and her four siblings were born in). In March of 1944, she is just like any other normal 17 year old young woman; she has a happy family, together with the usual disagreements with her siblings from time to time, she lives in a nice house and has a big wardrobe full of pretty clothes, she has been educated at the gymnasium in Szatmár, and she's in a happy relationship with her former tutor Mihai (who is twice her age and not Jewish). Nowhere else in Europe were the stifling and ever-increasing restrictions, ghettoisation, and deportation of the Jewish community carried out swifter, more brutally, or with such enthusiastic support from the local populace as in Hungary and the areas of other countries (Romania, Slovakia, the Czech Republic) which had been annexed to Hungary in the late Thirties. As in all other Shoah memoirs taking place in Hungary, here too we see these things happening at light speed, with former friends and neighbors suddenly turning on them, and almost universal collaboration or silent support. Among the few people who show any kind of disagreement with what's going on are Yanos, the Hershes' grocer, and a man who slaps his little boy for shouting abuses at them as they're being transported to the ghetto in Szatmár. Otherwise everyone just looked, many of them shouting and throwing stones. It made me sick to read about the little boy who shouted slurs at them and wiggled his fingers in his ears as they were all being marched to the death train, as his mother smiled at him fondly. Already these small children had not only been taught but encouraged to hate.

Gizelle catches the eye of "Dr." Mengele when they arrive at Auschwitz because of her polka-dot dress, and the fact that she can speak German. She is made to stand at the head of the line with him and ask everyone his or her age, translating the answer into German for him. Because of this duty, she quickly comes to realise who's being sent left and who's being sent right. At the time, she still believes, or at least wants to believe, that the parents, elderly, and small children are being sent to a different barracks, and that they've been taken to a factory where they won't be harmed. However, she is puzzled by how most of the women over 35 and young women who happen to have children are being sent to the right, since they appear young and healthy enough to her to work in the factory with the other people. Doing some quick thinking, when her own family approaches, she is able to lie that her youngest sister, who is twelve, is really fifteen, which ends up saving her life; she also ups the ages of her other two sisters.

Haunted by her mother's final command to watch over her younger siblings and to save them, whatever happens, Gizelle does just that over the entire length of their internment. Her younger brother has been sent off to the men's section of the camp, but she's still able to look after three of her younger siblings. As bestial as their living conditions are, and as much constant danger as their very lives are in, she manages to keep all of her little sisters alive through the three camps they are in, along with a friend of theirs whom they adopt as their Lagerschwester and the fifth person in their row of five. During all of this time, she also somehow manages to shield her sisters from the truth of what has really happened to their parents and that they're in a constant life or death situation, even though just about all of the other teenage prisoners quickly realised just what had happened to the people who had been sent to the other side and knew that the constant selections they were then subjected to were similarly to decide who would live and who would be murdered. Luckily for them, the second camp they are sent to is a factory, where they have improved living conditions and don't have to worry about the threat of selections. In the factory, Gizelle also manages to get a privileged job as a waiter, which enables her to sneak real food to the other prisoners. She also keeps looking out for her sisters after the liberation, both during their recovery and then in the DP camp Feldafing in Bavaria. During their stay in Feldafing, they get in contact with an aunt and uncle in America, who start the process of sponsoring them for immigration. They also meet General Eisenhower while in Feldafing. The book ends with an appendix addressing the oft-asked question of what the world knew and when, and what the world did, or more accurately didn't do, as the Shoah unfolded. It also touches on events after the war, when immigration to the United States and Israel was still being held back by quotas, and how finally things were turned around for the survivors who were desperate to start new lives in those places.

My only complaint about this book is that it wasn't long enough! It would've been great had there been a few more chapters, completing the narrative of their time in Feldafing and their eventual immigration to New York, maybe even a chapter or two on their early days in the new land. Not enough Shoah memoirs have sequels or enough information on what happened afterward, even though the reader is often left wanting to know more about these people s/he has come to know and love so well. However, at least it goes further after the liberation than some books of this nature do, instead of only having a couple of pages describing what happened next.
LONUDOG
I hope this powerful memoir is considered in the same league as the Holocaust classic, "All But My Life." It is just as excellent and goes into much more detail about the sadism, inhumanity and unbelievable cruelty of the Nazis.

The survival of these sisters is a miracle, against all odds. There is much to learn from their bravery. I will never forget the image of them in a filthy, freezing dormitory with hardly anything to cover them, then getting up, being fed hardly anything and having to go to work in the cold. When they are sick they cannot let anyone know. They know what will happen to them.

The title of the book is the last words they hear from their mother. They never see her face again.
Fog
I've read this book about 3 1/2 times over the past 10 years and each time I just get more and more emotional about the contents. This is an increadable and heartwrenching first hand telling of the horrific treatment of jews during the holacost. I've read many many books and this one still haunts my thoughts and dreams to this day and the last time I read it was years ago!! I recommend this amazing book whole heartedly to anyone!
Steelrunner
A friend referred me to this book. It read like a fictional novel...but of course it is a true story...and an amazing story. I would recommend it to book clubs. I think you could have a fascinating discussion about the book. It was very difficult for me to put it down.
Without a doubt, the best book I have read on the Holocaust. A stunning book, beautifully written.