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Download The Lives of Jean Toomer: A Hunger for Wholeness ePub

by Richard Eldridge,Cynthia Earl Kerman

Download The Lives of Jean Toomer: A Hunger for Wholeness ePub
  • ISBN 0807113549
  • ISBN13 978-0807113547
  • Language English
  • Author Richard Eldridge,Cynthia Earl Kerman
  • Publisher Louisiana State University Press; 1st edition (September 1, 1987)
  • Pages 411
  • Formats docx mbr lit mobi
  • Category Biography
  • Size ePub 1487 kb
  • Size Fb2 1137 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 716

Baton rouge 1987 1st Lousiana State University. Toomer was fiction writer, follower of Gurdjieff and later a Quaker. Hardcover. Large octavo, 411pp., cloth. Near Fine in VG DJ.

Kerman, Cynthia Earl; Eldridge, Richard, 1940-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on April 13, 2015. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

I have not read any of Jean Toomer's work as of yet, only articles, some of his poems and this book about his life. The authors try to keep Toomer's varied accomplishments in perspective

I have not read any of Jean Toomer's work as of yet, only articles, some of his poems and this book about his life. The authors try to keep Toomer's varied accomplishments in perspective. They aim to correct misunderstandings regarding Toomer's position on race and offer his concept of the "universal man"; as one beyond racial boundaries. They also look closely at Toomer's inclination toward mysticism and spirituality. The authors find that Toomer's intense need to be perfect a In A Perfect World.

Kerman, Cynthia Earl, & Richard Eldridge, A Hunger for Wholeness: The Lives of Jean Toomer, Louisiana State University Press: Baton Rouge, 1987. Lewis, R. W. The Poetry of Hart Crane: A Critical Study, Princeton University Press: Princeton, 1967. Lewis, Thomas S. e. Letters of Hart Crane and His Family, Columbia University Press: New York, 1974

THE LIVES OF JEAN TOOMER A Hunger for Wholeness. By Cynthia Earl Kerman and Richard Eldridge

THE LIVES OF JEAN TOOMER A Hunger for Wholeness. By Cynthia Earl Kerman and Richard Eldridge. 411 pp. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press. THE ferment in Afro-American culture in the 1960's rescued from oblivion several books, of which the most unusual was Jean Toomer's ''Cane

Kerman, Cynthia Earl and Richard Eldridge, The Lives of Jean Toomer: A Hunger for Wholeness, Louisiana State University Press, 1989.

Kerman, Cynthia Earl and Richard Eldridge, The Lives of Jean Toomer: A Hunger for Wholeness, Louisiana State University Press, 1989. p. 222. ^ Janis, Eugenia Parry, "No One I Know: The Mystery of Marjorie Content, Photographer," Marjorie Content: Photographs, ed. Jill Quasha, New York: Norton, 1994, . 4.

The standard biography of Toomer is Cynthia Kerman and Richard Eldridge, The Lives of Jean Toomer: A Hunger for Wholeness (1987)

The standard biography of Toomer is Cynthia Kerman and Richard Eldridge, The Lives of Jean Toomer: A Hunger for Wholeness (1987). The best collections of critical essays on Toomer are Frank Durham, e. The Merrill Studies in Cane (1971); Darwin Turner, e. Cane: An Authoritative Text, Background, Criticism (1988); Therman B. O'Daniel, Jean Toomer: A Critical Evaluation (1988); and Robert B. Jones, e. Critical Essays on Jean Toomer (1994).

Cynthia Earl Kerman is professor of English emerita at Villa Julie College in Stevenson, Maryland. She is the author of Creative Tension: The Life of Kenneth Boulding. Richard Eldridge is principal of the Buckingham Friends School in Lahaska, Pennsylvania. Shipping: FREE Within . Destination, rates & speeds.

Cynthia Earl Kerman and Richard Eldridge, The Lives of Jean Toomer: A Hunger for Wholeness (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1987). Kent Anderson Leslie and Willard B. Gatewood Jr. "'This Father of Mine. a Sort of Mystery': Jean Toomer's Georgia Heritage," Georgia Historical Quarterly 77 (winter 1993). Nellie Y. McKay, Jean Toomer, Artist: A Study of His Literary Life and Work, 1894-1936 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1984).

Cynthia Kerman was an English professor at Villa Julie College. She wrote a biography on Kenneth Boulding, a Quaker economist, and collaborated with Richard Eldridge to write Jean Toomer’s biography. Richard Eldridge is a philosophy professor at Swarthmore College. He has written nine novels, one of which is the Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Literature. He also published thirty-seven articles in various journals.

Jean Toomer and Margery Latimer. Also, an author note states Castro is writing a book on Latimer. Kerman, Cynthia Earl; Eldridge, Richard (1987). The Lives of Jean Toomer: A Hunger for Wholeness. ISBN 978-0-8071-1548-0. In New York, Latimer met Jean Toomer, a writer associated with modernism and the Harlem Renaissance. Of mixed race, he was known for his first novel, Cane (1923), a modernist exploration of his African-American roots in Georgia. Latimer, Margery (1984). Guardian Angel and Other Stories.

Talk about The Lives of Jean Toomer: A Hunger for Wholeness


Qumen
Falsely labeled as a “black” author because of his book of poetry and short stories, CANE (which deals almost exclusively with multiracial people), Toomer fought a life-long battle to be recognized for what he truly was. His theories of a “universal man” beyond racial demarcation makes him an important dissenting voice against the hypodescent status quo.
Bil
This is one of the best books I have ever read! Because I am a huge fan of CANE, I had to read this bio of Toomer. It is very detailed, very insightful, and provides a full view of Toomer and his family, leaving it to the reader to make a judgement about The Toomer family and Jean Toomer. I feel Toomer was a genius, and yes he was an egomaniac, but who cares? He was sensitive and spiritual and sexual and hungry for understanding and all those qualities come across in CANE and in this bio. Interestingly enough, his detatchment from blackness makes him more interesting because he forces you to think outside the box. [After all, the Black race is the only one in the US history to be said to hinge on "one drop" which is pretty ridiculous. "One drop" was a tool to keep lightskinned blacks from getting access to the money of their fathers.] I only wish Toomer could have written 1 or 2 more books in the vein of CANE.
Gavirgas
I have not read any of Jean Toomer's work as of yet, only articles, some of his poems and this book about his life. The authors try to keep Toomer's varied accomplishments in perspective. They aim to correct misunderstandings regarding Toomer's position on race and offer his concept of the "universal man"; as one beyond racial boundaries. They also look closely at Toomer's inclination toward mysticism and spirituality. The authors find that Toomer's intense need to be perfect and whole gave focus to the many passions he embraced throughout his life. Jean's self-description in 1922 was as follows:

"Racially, I seem to have (who knows for sure) seven blood mixtures: French, Dutch, Welsh, Negro, German, Jewish, and Indian. One half of my family is definitely colored.... And, I alone, as far as I know, have striven for a spiritual fusion analogous to the fact of racial intermingling."

Later in his life, about 1948, when he is plagued with illness, there remains continual unresolved problems with the black heritage of his racial make-up (his daughter Marjery was not informed of any of her racial heritage). He then says of himself:

"I do not really know myself, who I am, my selfhood, my spiritual identity, or what I am. I have some information about it, but also some misinformation, some misunderstanding, but much illusion. Real motivations? What is my aim, assuming that I have but one aim? I do not really know my wife, my child, my closest friends. I do not know anyone or anything."

I feel Jean Toomer was a man who was troubled by his heritage. He may have been better off to make a choice than to spend his life searching and hoping for a different world where race didn't matter. Although, I also feel that Jean was a head of his time in his thinking when he states that the racial issue in America would be resolved only when white America could accept the fact that its racial 'purity' was a myth...On the other hand, racial purity among blacks was just as much a myth and only encouraged defensiveness and unconscious imitation, like that of an adolescent who defines his revolt against his parents by the very values he is trying to renounce. Race, he said, was a fictional construct, of no use for understanding people."

It's true that whites are not pure, blacks are not pure, and race is a social (fictional) construct, now proven by science, but realistically physical appearance still determines for the most part what race a person is assumed to be, so therefore troubled times still remain in mixed-race cultures where some have not, as of yet, grasped this thinking.

Physically white, and he had every right to identify as such, but racially mixed, he just couldn't make a choice in a society that sees colors not just beings, brought to mind by his poem titled, "People." Toomer did not define himself as an African American but as an American. Toomer's lifelong effort to transcend what he regarded as the narrow divisions of race is fully explored in his works. Toomer's position on race is the principal reason for the absence of racial themes in his writings produced during and after his discovery of Gurdjieff and Quakerism, as well as for his conscious disassociation from Cane: the work that has earned him a central place in the African American literary tradition. A place he didn't really seem to want to be, despite his concept of the "universal man"; as one beyond racial boundaries.

Toomer's philosophy was a wonderful notion, but not realistic. In not telling his daughter about her ancestry, continuously marrying white, and in most of his pursuits, it seems he lived more of a white life despite his refusal to conform to a racial classification.

Jean has been both praised and condemned by black critics and authors. He did what he felt was best on the surface, but not necessarily what was best for his inner being.

This is a good book about an interesting man.