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Download Make the Bread, Buy the Butter: What You Should and Shouldn't Cook from Scratch -- Over 120 Recipes for the Best Homemade Foods ePub

by Jennifer Reese

Download Make the Bread, Buy the Butter: What You Should and Shouldn't Cook from Scratch -- Over 120 Recipes for the Best Homemade Foods ePub
  • ISBN 1451605870
  • ISBN13 978-1451605877
  • Language English
  • Author Jennifer Reese
  • Publisher Atria Books; 1st Printing edition (October 18, 2011)
  • Pages 304
  • Formats mbr lit txt mobi
  • Category Biography
  • Subcategory Professionals and Academics
  • Size ePub 1616 kb
  • Size Fb2 1376 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 338

Known to her online foodie following as The Tipsy Baker, Jennifer Reese brings a realistic—and very funny—perspective to the homemade trend, testing whether to make from scratch or simply buy over 100 foods.When Jennifer Reese lost her job, she was overcome by an impulse common among the recently unemployed: to economize by doing for herself what she had previously paid for. She had never before considered making her own peanut butter and pita bread, let alone curing her own prosciutto or raising turkeys. And though it sounded logical that “doing it yourself” would cost less, she had her doubts. So Reese began a series of kitchen-related experiments, taking into account the competing demands of everyday contemporary American family life as she answers some timely questions: When is homemade better? Cheaper? Are backyard eggs a more ethical choice than store-bought? Will grinding and stuffing your own sausage ruin your week? Is it possible to make an edible maraschino cherry? Some of Reese’s discoveries will surprise you: Although you should make your hot dog buns, guacamole, and yogurt, you should probably buy your hamburger buns, potato chips, and rice pudding. Tired? Buy your mayonnaise. Inspired? Make it. With its fresh voice and delightful humor, Make the Bread, Buy the Butter gives 120 recipes with eminently practical yet deliciously fun “Make or buy” recommendations. Reese is relentlessly entertaining as she relates her food and animal husbandry adventures, which amuse and perplex as well as nourish and sustain her family. Her tales include living with a backyard full of cheerful chickens, muttering ducks, and adorable baby goats; countertops laden with lacto-fermenting pickles; and closets full of mellowing cheeses. Here’s the full picture of what is involved in a truly homemade life—with the good news that you shouldn’t try to make everything yourself—and how to get the most out of your time in the kitchen.

I snorted over her tale of making homemade hot dogs.

I snorted over her tale of making homemade hot dogs. I snickered merrily while reading about her attempts at keeping and raising chickens and goats -(big successes!), ducks and turkeys - (eh, not so much.

When Jennifer Reese lost her job, she was overcome by an impulse common among the recently unemployed: to. .

When Jennifer Reese lost her job, she was overcome by an impulse common among the recently unemployed: to economize by doing for herself what she had previously paid for. She had never before considered making her own peanut butter and pita bread, let alone curing her own prosciutto or raising turkeys. Reese is relentlessly entertaining as she relates her food and animal husbandry adventures, which amuse and perplex as well as nourish and sustain her family.

I still don’t know which. That apple tree, it gave me ideas. When Mark and I were first married, we rented a house in the foggiest neighborhood in San Francisco, a famously foggy city

Genre/Form: Cookbooks. Publication & Distribution: Barcelona. Author: Chomsky, Noam. Az pusht-i panjarah : majmah-i shir hir Jmbarsang. by ?hir J?m?bar?sang.

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Some of Reese’s discoveries will surprise you: Although you should make your hot dog buns, guacamole, and .

Reese is relentlessly entertaining as she relates her food and animal husbandry adventures, which amuse and perplex as well as nourish and sustain her family.

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Talk about Make the Bread, Buy the Butter: What You Should and Shouldn't Cook from Scratch -- Over 120 Recipes for the Best Homemade Foods


Dddasuk
This book was a fun read, but the recipes so far are far less than impressive.

I am an accomplished bread-baker, but am always up for trying new recipes. Therefore, the first recipe tried from this book was her "Everyday Bread." I had misgivings from the start, but I plugged on. I should have listened to my gut, as the recipe produced two bricks that weren't even edible straight from the oven (and I've found that even pretty awful bread is good straight from the oven with butter!). This weekend, I made the chocolate birthday cake recipe. This turned out fine, however, it's worth nothing that it is basically a Wacky cake AND it comes from someone else's cookbook (The I Hate to Cook Book, by Peg Bracken). The author includes a cooked icing recipe and says that her grandmother made it differently, but she feels this method is easier. The icing turned out okay, but not great, and I'm left wanting to ask how her grandmother made it, because I strongly suspect it's much better if made that way.

I also found her difficulty/hassle ratings to be baffling at times. For instance, she says that roasting your own chicken is a hassle and you should just buy a rotisserie chicken, but that homemade marshmallows are not at all a hassle. I'm not sure what planet she's from, on either account. A roast chicken is no work at all. And marshmallows, while not difficult, are a pain in the butt and a massive mess.

I will probably try a couple more recipes in the name of science, but thus far, I am not impressed. I'd suggest borrowing the book for a fun read, but pass on actually making anything from it.
Alister
I like this book and actually read it through before I made any of the recipes in it. Yeah, I read this like a book, not like a cook book. It's that kind of book.

I've since made quite a number of the items in here and still plan to try more of them. I like that it demystify's a lot of things (like butter, bacon and marshmellows to name a few) that you have probably just always bought at the grocery store. I am particularly fond of the vadouvan mac and cheese recipe (tip, I found the vadouvan spice locally at Williams Sonoma).

It should be pointed out that many of the recipes in this book are from other places. She acknowledges her sources as appropriate, but you may find (as I did) that some of the recipes are from books you already own. For all that, she covers SO MUCH GROUND in this book, that someone would be hard pressed to have made a majority of these recipes and still be interested in a book like this.

My one negative note, and it's a personal thing, but I find her writing style a little anoying. In a number of places it comes across to me as a combination of being preachy and self depricating at once. In those places, it feels like she is saying "I did this, it didn't work out, people (husband, kids, family, neighbors, etc...) were upset with me for doing it again and again, I was probably wrong, but I'd do it again because I was right to do what I wanted." Perhaps I'm reading to much into it.

Don't let that stop you from getting the book. As I said above, I like this book and look at it with some regularity.
*Nameless*
I just finished reading this book cover-to-cover today. I tend to do that with cookbooks anyway... but this one was especially fun, with its content as much entertaining anecdotes about family and cooking as it is recipes... including whether or not to raise chickens, goats, turkeys, bees... (I do have 3 beehives, and better luck with them!)

While I have not yet tried any of the recipes per se, the recipe for ricotta is very close to the one I always use with my raw milk. I'll be interested in trying the yogurt, since my raw-milk yogurt is usually really watery (though bread and our dog love the whey!). I've also made a lot of sauerkraut based on Katz's recipe, 1 recipe of kimchee similarly based, and several of the cured meats based on "Chaucuterie", and all of these have been delicious. This gives me faith in her other recipes. (If, when I cook more specifically out of this book and they do not work out well, I'll update this review.)

I am VERY appreciative of her personal approach to the perennial DIY question "Is it worth it?" I'm rather a DIY nut- as the previous indicates- so my answer is usually "Of course!" even when that is not a particularly sensible answer! And personally, I am itching to have the freezer space to make and freeze croissant dough and puff pastry. And I bet I could make a mean Napolean with that puff pastry.

If you're a DIY fan, I think you'll love this book, even when you disagree with her assessments. it's just so much fun! If you're not- well, this is probably not for you, unless you want to read it as a horror story and thank all relevant gods that you are not tempted to buy ducklings on impulse.

Edited to add: I just made the marinara sauce from this and put it on spaghetti. Wonderful! A very clean flavor, and a very straightforward recipe.