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Download War in Val d'Orcia: 1943-1944 : a diary ePub

by Iris Origo

Download War in Val d'Orcia: 1943-1944 : a diary ePub
  • ISBN 0896215709
  • ISBN13 978-0896215702
  • Language English
  • Author Iris Origo
  • Publisher Thorndike Press (1984)
  • Pages 419
  • Formats azw mbr doc lrf
  • Category Biography
  • Subcategory Specific Groups
  • Size ePub 1994 kb
  • Size Fb2 1449 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 339


War in Val d'Orcia: An Italian War Diary 1943-1944. Iris Origo (1902-1988) was a British-born biographer and writer. She lived in Italy and devoted much of her life to the improvement of the Tuscan estate at La Foce, which she purchased with her husband in the 1920s.

War in Val d'Orcia: An Italian War Diary 1943-1944. During the Second World War, she sheltered refugee children and assisted many escaped Allied prisoners of war and partisans in defiance of Italy's fascist regime and Nazi occupation forces.

War in Val D'Orcia, 1943-1944. by. Origo, Iris, 1902-. On cover: An Italian war diary, 1943-1944. Originally published: London : J. Cape, c1947. Includes bibliographical references. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. t on November 14, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

An Italian War Diary, 1943–1944. Iris’s diary, War in Val d’Orcia, begins in January 1943. At this time she had one small daughter, Benedetta, born in August 1940, and was awaiting the birth of a third child (the Origos’ much-loved son, Gianni, had tragically died from meningitis in 1933 aged seven). In late 1942 the Allied victory over the Germans in North Africa had allowed them to turn their attention to chasing the enemy out of Italy, starting at the toe, while simultaneously harassing German strongholds like Genoa and Turin in the north with ferocious bombing raids.

War in Val D'Orcia" is a rather terse diary of events throughout Italy in 1943-1944 written by the English-born wife of a wealthy landowner in Tuscany. Until I read this book I had often wondered why there are so many abandoned farm buildings in Tuscany: I now understand that until relatively recently there was a feudal system in place, where farmers did not actually own their land but instead worked it for the landowner in exchange for half of their production. War in Val D'Orcia" exposed me to aspects of Italian culture that I had never even really thought about before.

War in Val d'Orcia book. Iris writes the diary and she states th This is a very interesting diary, written during the years 1943 and 1944 by Iris Cutting, a British woman who married Marchese Antonio Origo and lived with him in Southern Tuscany. The couple has a daughter, Benedetta, born 1940, and another baby, Donata, born in 1943.

War in Val d'Orcia is Iris Origo's elegantly simple chronicle of daily life at La Foce, a manor in . .This is an exceptional book which bears precious witness to the way WWII brought out both the good and bad-but mostly good-in people living or passing through a region of Tuscany.

Title : War in Val d'Orcia. About Universal Books Limited. During World War Two she and her husband, the Marchese Antonio Origo, converted La Foce into a refuge for children from the bombed cities of northern Italy and escaped Allied prisoners of war. The Marchesa Origo was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in England. Country of Publication.

War in Val d'Orcia is Iris Origo's elegantly simple chronicle of daily life at La Foce, a manor in a Tuscan no-man's land bracketed by foreign invasion and civil war. With the immediacy only a diary can have, the book tells how the Marchesa Origo, an Anglo-American married to an Italian. With the immediacy only a diary can have, the book tells how the Marchesa Origo, an Anglo-American married to an Italian landowner, kept La Foce and its farms functioning while war threatened to overrun it and its people

This Study Guide consists of approximately 29 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of War in Val D'Orcia, 1943-1944. Print Word PDF. This section contains 817 words (approx

This Study Guide consists of approximately 29 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of War in Val D'Orcia, 1943-1944. This section contains 817 words (approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page). This author, like the author of perhaps the most famous war diary in the world, Anne Frank, is personally and intimately positioned to write on the subject from a place of experience

Short Title WAR IN VAL DORCIA. Non-Fiction Military/War Books. Star Wars Comic Books.

Short Title WAR IN VAL DORCIA. Blank Diaries & Journals.

Talk about War in Val d'Orcia: 1943-1944 : a diary


Hellmaster
I have intended to read this book for quite some time but decided to read it now in Florence. It is the most wonderful read for anyone interested in Italian life during WW2. I have friends here in Florence who were born just after this period and actually still suffer at the memories of listening to grandparents, parents, aunts and uncles telling stories round fires on winter nights. There are troubles in the world right now but i am not convinced we would have the same resources. This book is just a diary - not written for publication, but written because the writer was not sure if her family would survive. It is a simple narration of just the facts of life as they seemed back then. It has led me on to read more about Iris Origo in another book published just recently. Then I will love to travel to visit her home and garden - La Foce. The book gave me such a feeling for the period that driving through woods in this area just the other day I would not have been surprised to see a bunch of partisans jump out - but also looking at the density of forest, it is easy to imagine how many soldiers, deserters, Germans, Italians, Fascists, Anti-Fascists and kids just too afraid to be trooped off to some labour camp - spent their days - both starving, freezing and afraid in turn. Everyone should read this book and put it in their own context.
Jairani
On our very first Italian vacation in 1978 we stayed in a convent that rented rooms to tourists. The mother superior related some very interesting stories of her contact with the German commanding general of the Florence military area who happened to be Catholic and a respecter of art who refused Hitler's order to destroy Florence and it's treasures. With that in mind and having also vacationed in Val D'Orcia in subsequent years I was very open to hear the history of the occupation and war from a resident land owner.
I thoroughly enjoyed the both the stories and the perspective in which they were presented. Although the author was a Brit she was a long time resident of Italy and that combination shone through nicely.
She blended the reported Italian national and BBC news, her own daily experiences and the "neighborhood" news into a very interesting picture of the daily tribulations experienced locally and even though I knew that the Allies had severely bombed Italian cities and towns it was still a shock to read of that brutality and how many civilians were targeted.
I found it interesting that many of the local German military did not follow Hitler's orders and were somewhat relaxed and allowed the Local Italians to navigate their daily lives safely while aiding the Allied prisoners to subsist and eventually escape.
The book was both enjoyable and a learning experience
blodrayne
The author, an Anglo-American born Marquesa, describes eloquently and in detail the hardships endured by the (Tuscan) people during the 1943-44 Fascist and German occupation, followed by the Allied invasion during which the German army destroyed or looted everything. This left the villagers with virtually nothing to help them through the winter: no housing, no furniture, no beds, no lights, no heating, housewares, cooking utensils or food, no medicines, medical supplies...all was stolen or destroyed, often maliciously as the German army retreated. German reprisal executions were common and the locals lived in terror as often the innocent were the people executed. The number of partisans and escaped POWs in Tuscany were constantly running from the Axis forces but managed to stay mostly free for long periods. An amazing account of WWII life in a country occupied by a brutal and ruthless regime. I recommend it
Yramede
I cannot praise this book enough. The author wrote a "War Diary" for a year during World War II while she and her Italian husband ran a large farm near Siena, Italy. They had 57 tenant farmers and using a democratic method centuries old, the owners financed the tenants for their agricultural costs and at harvest time, everyone shared the profits. The Origos took in war refugees (23 children) and built a school and a small hospital for the children and also fed and clothed them. More important, they harbored many other war refugees: anti-Nazis, POWs, members of the Allied forces, and others who needed assistance. The Irigos risked their live in doing so, as did may of the farmer/tenants. Iris was a hugely wealthy Irish American who lived a very luxurious life before she married Antonio Origo, who was ten years older than she. He was the illegitimate son of a marchese, so she became a marchesa. Iris was a well educated scholar who wrote many books in addition to this diary, which was published about 5 years before her death. She was named a Dame of the British Empire for this diary.
Her matter of fact recounting of the Origo's efforts is extraordinary.
Xtintisha
"War in Val D'Orcia" is a rather terse diary of events throughout Italy in 1943-1944 written by the English-born wife of a wealthy landowner in Tuscany. As an account of life under Nazi rule it's not nearly as profound or fascinating as Victor Klemperer's "I Will Bear Witness" but after the first 100 pages (or so) which are somewhat strangely detached and impersonal ("In Rome to have the baby"), and mostly an account of Italian national politics at that time, I literally couldn't put it down.

Until I read this book I had often wondered why there are so many abandoned farm buildings in Tuscany: I now understand that until relatively recently there was a feudal system in place, where farmers did not actually own their land but instead worked it for the landowner in exchange for half of their production. "War in Val D'Orcia" exposed me to aspects of Italian culture that I had never even really thought about before. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the history and culture of Italy and Tuscany in particular.

This is the first book by or about Iris Origo that I have read but it won't be the last.