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Download When You Work for a Bully: Assessing Your Options and Taking Action ePub

by Susan Futterman

Download When You Work for a Bully: Assessing Your Options and Taking Action ePub
  • ISBN 0971953880
  • ISBN13 978-0971953888
  • Language English
  • Author Susan Futterman
  • Publisher Croce Publishing (August 1, 2004)
  • Pages 248
  • Formats docx rtf azw lrf
  • Category Business
  • Subcategory Business Culture
  • Size ePub 1307 kb
  • Size Fb2 1497 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 825

For employees who are tired of constant confrontation, this book provides instructions for leaving an abusive situation in the workplace in a dignified way and moving on in a manner that is financially practical. Employees learn the numerous exit strategies available to get out of the abusive work situation, along with the benefits and drawbacks of each. From the decision-making process that will determine an employee’s next steps to the information needed to implement this decision, this book provides the data and resources to make those difficult choices as well as the knowledge required to set them into action. Advice on everything from knowing how to identify a bully to utilizing self-defense tactics and budgeting finances enables bullied employees to take control of complicated and uncomfortable situations.

245 pages ; 22 cm. For employees who are tired of constant confrontation, this book provides instructions for leaving an abusive situation in the workplace in a dignified way and moving on in a manner that is financially practical

245 pages ; 22 cm. For employees who are tired of constant confrontation, this book provides instructions for leaving an abusive situation in the workplace in a dignified way and moving on in a manner that is financially practical.

According to Susan Futterman, in her book When You Work for a Bully: Assessing Your Options and Taking Action, readers are encouraged to, take a step back to make sure you’re distinguishing between genuine feedback, even feedback undiplomatically presented, an. .

According to Susan Futterman, in her book When You Work for a Bully: Assessing Your Options and Taking Action, readers are encouraged to, take a step back to make sure you’re distinguishing between genuine feedback, even feedback undiplomatically presented, and bullying. Futterman & Paroutaud, 2004) Futterman helps to differentiate between poor management skills and bullying by describing bullying as: Persistent.

That's when an employer makes an employee's work experience so.I was somewhat surprised by the prevalence of bullying in the workplace.

That's when an employer makes an employee's work experience so miserable that any reasonable person would leave under the circumstances. If a worker can legally prove that s/he was forced to resign for this reason, s/he can obtain monetary unemployment benefits. When You Work For a Bully: Assessing Your Options and Taking Action by Susan Futterman, 2004. The author reported about a 20% prevalence in general in the workplace, 28% in the medical field, and 33% in the legal field. books about bullying.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Information on strategies for coping with bullies and on attempting to l An occasional run-in, or perhaps even an outright argument, with your employer is not unusual

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking When You Work for A Bully: Assessing Your Options and Taking Action as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Information on strategies for coping with bullies and on attempting to l An occasional run-in, or perhaps even an outright argument, with your employer is not unusual. It in fact may be positive, clearing the air and helping you both to get off to a new start. But when the confrontations become constant, bitter and, ultimately, abusive, it’s time to take action.

For employees who are tired of constant confrontation, this book provides instructions for leaving an abusive situation in the workplace in a dignified way an.

com's Susan Futterman Page and shop for all Susan Futterman books. I'm a longtime business journalist (now in financial communications)who wrote my How to Work for a Bully after suffering through the experience for far longer than I should have. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Susan Futterman. My husband, three cats and I now live happily ever after in the San Francisco Bay Area. Are You an Author? Help us improve our Author Pages by updating your bibliography and submitting a new or current image and biography. Learn more at Author Central. Books by Susan Futterman.

When You Work for a Bully: Assessing Your Options and Taking Action" by Susan Futterman Adams, Andrea with contributions from Crawford, Neil "Bullying at Work: How to Confront and Overcome It" (1992) Bassman, Emily S. "Abuse in the Workplace: Management.

By Susan M. Heathfield. Updated June 25, 2019 Do you think you work with a bully? . Updated June 25, 2019. Up to 81% of employers are perceived as doing nothing and resisting taking action when targets of bullying fill out a survey. In the general public, only 4. % perceive employers as doing nothing. 29% of employees who are targets of bullies remain silent about their experiences.

Assessing Your Options and Taking Action. This book comes out of my own experience with a workplace bully-my former boss. Published August 1, 2004 by Croce Publishing Group, Llc.

and Susan Futterman's When You Work for a Bully: Assessing Your Options and Taking Action (Croce). Handbook of Bullying in Schools: An International Perspective By Shane R. Jimerson; Susan M. Swearer; Dorothy L. Espelage Routledge, 2010.

The most popular include Noa Davenport's Mobbing: Emotional Abuse in the American Workplace (Civil Society), Gary and Ruth Namie's The Bully at Work: What You Can Do to Stop the Hurt and Reclaim Your Dignity on the Job (Sourcebooks), and Susan Futterman's When You Work for a Bully: Assessing Your Options and Taking Action (Croce). Companies have good reasons to be worried about boardroom bullies.

Talk about When You Work for a Bully: Assessing Your Options and Taking Action


Umsida
Finding out the characteristics of a workplace bully is the first step in recognizing this particular form of abuse. Susan Futterman has written a well balanced book that incorporates the best of all you need - symptoms, guidelines and most of all - validity for what you may be suffering at the hands of the bully at work. Very well written and I highly recommend it for a person who is or has experienced bullying or is involved with a person who is going through bullying. If you are involved with a person who is being bullied - please support them. Its really hard to emphasize because of the toxic nature of the workplace bully. But the one being bullied needs support from friends and family. My recommendation for anyone being bullied - GET OUT as soon as you can!!!!!
Envias
As other reviewers have noted, the focus is primarily on how to exit a job, not on other ways in which one might try to deal with a bully or to reduce the impact bullying has on one.

I also found it annoying that some material seemed out of place and some passages seemed to be repeated.

The book was okay, a 3, but I've found other books on the topic more helpful.
Daigrel
Many, maybe most people identify themselves by their profession or the company that they work for. Many times it is a happy, fulfilling part of their life, but if is isn't, there is a good chance someone at your workplace is making you miserable.

If that person is your boss, who constantly undermines your work to the point you question your very self, and when works becomes a source of stress, causing physical ailments, this book will help you decide the path you need to take.

Bullying is unfortunately very real in the workplace and, at least in the US, a legal (though unethical) way to manage employees. I strongly suggest this book to anyone who is physically ill at the thought of going to their place of employment every day.
Winn
I can see why some people love this book. It talks about how awful bullies are how much they can destroy your life, and it goes into great detail about how to quit, how to manage your finances after you quit, how to pursue legal action to get revenge on the bully, and how to get a new job.

However, this book is supposed to be about "assessing your option" - indicating it might actually help you WORK with the bully. In reality, the author, Susan Futterman, pretty much tells you up fron that it is completely hopeless to work with a bully and exhorts you to sue them instead. Entire chapters are dedicated to your legal options. In fact in one section she talks about how most wise career coaches would tell you to leave the company with grace, since it is your own career and life that you are maintaining. She says this is balderdash, that it's much more rewarding to get emotional satisfaction for yourself and burn those bridges.

Reading the bio material, it appears that Susan was herself bullied by a boss, she parted ways with that boss, and the experience caused her to write the book. So one gets the sense that in her case it was futile to find a solution with the bully and now she wants to coach everyone else in the situation to go through that transition using what she learned about getting COBRA insurance, getting on food stamps, and so on. Yes, I appreciate that for people who take her specific path, this book is very helpful. But - again - what about the many people who are looking for tips to COPE and SURVIVE with a bully? She gives up on them very quickly.

So, let's start at the beginning. Susan does briefly cover how to differentiate between a regular manager and a bully. A regular manager will try to phrase criticism so it is at least reasonably constructive. You did well on the report, but need to focus more on catching typos. A bully will constantly criticize, and even the very rare compliments will have a criticism in them. Bullying isn't about one act. It's about a continual, constant stream of criticisms. You could look at one specific instance and think it wasn't that bad if it was a one time thing, but because it happens constantly with no let-up it becomes bullying.

If your boss has a legitimate concern - for example you agreed that your sales quota for March was $X and you made nowhere near $X - then your boss has a correct reason to bring this up and press you to do better. Bullying would be if you never set a quota, you followed his instructions and did everything he asked and he started yelling at you for not doing well enough. Some managers are simply clumsy. They have legitimate complaints with your work and simply do not express their frustration well. With those managers you can learn how to "manage your manager", gently guide them towards a more productive feedback cycle so you can indeed meet the goals. However, with a bully, you never have goals. You don't get useful feedback, you don't get any constructive direction on how to achieve what they want. You just get abuse, yelling, criticisms and demeaning comments.

Bullies usually don't see themselves as bullies! They think they are great, powerful managers. They think they are brutally honest and feel that's a good trait. They feel that they're incredibly thorough, and do not see it as micro-managing or nit-picking. They do not realize their reactions are completely lacking in productive value. They think their yelling should be enough to get the job done.

This information was all *wonderful* and I was incredibly psyched after reading all of this to get into the meat of the matter. After all this was only the first part of the book! We were exploring the nature of bullies, a bit about what made them tick, and how to make sure we weren't calling a "people-challenged" manager a bully just because they were on the gruff side. There was hope to turn the situation around.

Unfortunately, right there is where the helpful information for me ended. The book goes right into "prepare to leave immediately - and here is how". It was a real surprise to me. It is like getting a book on "how to work out things with your grumpy husband" and having the book say "OK this is why husbands can be grumpy. X, Y, Z. Here is what you do - get divorced! Get a great lawyer, sue the guy for all he's worth, and rant to your friends for years afterward about the waste of time he was."

I'm not too far off here. Susan pushes hard for everyone to leave their boss. Journal in detail every thing you do while you're leaving, because you might be able to sue him for millions. Only do what is required of you at the job. Be calm and professional, to bolster your legal case, and document every request and copy every request back to him. Put it all in your legal files. Have witnesses around for any interactions, and get them to sign legal documents.

Then she goes into all the "aftermath". She talks in great detail about finance issues, how to clean up your budget, how to use Canadian pharmacies to save cash? She goes in detail about how someone goes about quitting, and how to negotiate for a nice package on the way out. She talks about the ins and outs of job searching. And, of course, she has a very dense area on legal options and how to get back at your bully boss.

I can see if the book was titled "Bully Boss - How to Quit, Sue, and Seek Revenge". That would be the perfect title for this book. Again, she explicitly tells people that instead of leaving quietly, that it is far more satisfying to leave in a way that lets you exorcise your demons against your bully boss and get you the satisfaction you've craved. She says this even while acknowledging that career coaches would warn you this is the worst thing for your future career. She exhorts you to rant and rave to friends for months afterward, to cleanse your system. Every book I've read on healing focuses on filling yourself with calm, rewarding, encouraging thoughts - not with evil, revenge-fantasy harm-someone diatribes.

If you are working with a bully and are ALREADY thinking about quitting - and really need help landing on your feet - then I'd recommend this book. It does have a lot of detail about the steps you take in order to quit and make that transition. But if your issue is that you think your boss is a bully and want to get ideas for how to cope, this is NOT the book for you. Since that was - to me - what it was presenting itself to be, I would give this 3/5 stars.
Not-the-Same
I haven't had a chance to sit down and read it yet (loaded to my Kindle Fire HD in a snap! Sooo easy!), but just glancing through it it looks like it will help me a lot with my boss who is a big time bully.
Hellstaff
This book offered keen insight about the various types of bullies one has to contend with at work
Yozshubei
I worked for a bully... I had to read this book to help me recognize that "it" was not me, and help me escape.
This book provides great technics on how to not only deal with bullies at the job but also how to have peace of mind everyday at the job site. It's a great strategic book you won't know this until you read it!
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