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Download How They Got Away With It: White Collar Criminals and the Financial Meltdown ePub

by Stephen Handelman,David C. Brotherton Ph.D.,Susan Will

Download How They Got Away With It: White Collar Criminals and the Financial Meltdown ePub
  • ISBN 0231156901
  • ISBN13 978-0231156905
  • Language English
  • Author Stephen Handelman,David C. Brotherton Ph.D.,Susan Will
  • Publisher Columbia University Press (October 30, 2012)
  • Pages 384
  • Formats doc txt lit docx
  • Category Business
  • Subcategory Business Culture
  • Size ePub 1806 kb
  • Size Fb2 1424 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 870

A team of scholars with backgrounds in criminology, sociology, economics, business, government regulation, and law examine the historical, social, and cultural causes of the 2008 economic crisis. Essays probe the workings of the toxic subprime loan industry, the role of external auditors, the consequences of Wall Street deregulation, the manipulations of alpha hedge fund managers, and the "Ponzi-like" culture of contemporary capitalism. They unravel modern finance's complex schematics and highlight their susceptibility to corruption, fraud, and outright racketeering. They examine the involvement of enablers, including accountants, lawyers, credit rating agencies, and regulatory workers, who failed to protect the public interest and enforce existing checks and balances. While the United States was "ground zero" of the meltdown, the financial crimes of other countries intensified the disaster. Internationally-focused essays consider bad practices in China and the European property markets and draw attention to the far-reaching consequences of transnational money laundering and tax evasion schemes. By approaching the 2008 crisis from the perspective of white collar criminology, contributors build a more general understanding of the collapse and crystallize the multiple human and institutional factors preventing capture of even the worst offenders.

The small scale financial shenanigans of the large financial institutions were repackaged as "risk/reward" and went mainstream.

The small scale financial shenanigans of the large financial institutions were repackaged as "risk/reward" and went mainstream. Only the insiders benefited but everyone wanted to be a millionaire even if it was by gambling or a ponzi scheme. Laws were deliberately ambiguous so white collars could claim that "they didn't mean for this to happen.

Start by marking How They Got Away with It. .There are four sections, "The Roots of the Crisis," "Enablers of Fraud," "Perverted Justice" and "Perspectives from Afar," featuring several fantastic contributions from Susan Will, Gilbert Geis, Jock Young, David Freidrichs and Saskia Sassen.

Start by marking How They Got Away with It: White Collar Criminals and the Financial Meltdown as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

12 HOW THEY STILL TRY TO GET AWAY WITH IT: Crime in the Dutch Real Estate Sector Before and After the Crisis.

Book Description: A team of scholars with backgrounds in criminology, sociology, economics, business, government regulation, and law examine the historical, social, and cultural causes of the 2008 economic crisis. 12 HOW THEY STILL TRY TO GET AWAY WITH IT: Crime in the Dutch Real Estate Sector Before and After the Crisis.

Susan Will, Stephen Handelman, David C. Brotherton. David C. Brotherton is professor and chair of sociology at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Graduate Center, the City University of New York

Susan Will, Stephen Handelman, David C. A team of scholars with backgrounds in criminology, sociology, economics, business, government regulation, and law examine the historical, social, and cultural causes of the 2008 economic crisis. Brotherton is professor and chair of sociology at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Graduate Center, the City University of New York. His most recent publication, with Luis Barrios, is Banished to the Homeland: Dominican Deportees and Their Stories of Exile. Библиографические данные.

oceedings{Will2013HowTG, title {How they got away with it : white collar criminals and the financial meltdown}, author {Susan E. Brown Will and Stephen Handelman and David Charles Brotherton}, year {2013} }. Susan E. Brown Will, Stephen Handelman, David Charles Brotherton.

In book: How they got away with it: lessons from the financial meltdown, Chapter: Economic and financial .

Cite this publication.

White Collar Criminals and the Financial Meltdown. In such a climate, an operator like Madoff was destined for success, and that he got away with it for so long-thus the title of the book-is a matter that should provoke much discussion among regulators.

By approaching the 2008 crisis from the perspective of white collar criminology, contributors build a more general understanding of the collapse, and they crystallize the .

By approaching the 2008 crisis from the perspective of white collar criminology, contributors build a more general understanding of the collapse, and they crystallize the multiple human and institutional factors preventing justice from capturing even the worst offenders. Business Business Ethics. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. Give a Bookmate subscription →. About Bookmate.

Talk about How They Got Away With It: White Collar Criminals and the Financial Meltdown


Naril
Should be required reading in classrooms and used to bring suit against some players in the financial industry. If you are not angry about the losses the middle class and lower suffered in the economic crash of the real estate market, you should be after reading this book. The dissection of what went wrong is insightful and helped me better understand the crisis and why it was so challenging to sort out. I commend the authors on their research and reporting. The book is articulately written and easy to follow.
Valawye
These academics at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, show great understanding into the Financial crisis of the later 2000 decade.
This is a must if you are in the field of fraud or white-collar crime research.
Bad Sunny
A must read.
Hellblade
This book is not about numbers (you can find all you want in other books). It is a group of academics looking at the patterns and trends since the 1970s to explain how the public has lost its demand for justice (in other words forcing the government to act). Here's a summary of their comments from finance, legal, and social perspectives.

When wages stagnated and inflation roared, taking on more and more debt was the only way to maintain the standard of living and corporate "growth". With declining savings and bond interest, the public bought into the "investment" mantra as a substitute. Only "hitting the jackpot" in real estate or the stock market was going to provide a secure future for an indebted public.

No matter how profitable, corporations never pay off their loans (bonds). They just issue new bonds every 10 years and pay the interest (same as the government). (My GE prospectus says they owe over $338 Billion).

The small scale financial shenanigans of the large financial institutions were repackaged as "risk/reward" and went mainstream. Speculative bubbles appeared in Leveraged Buyouts, commodities, mortgages, and debt instruments. Only the insiders benefited but everyone wanted to be a millionaire even if it was by gambling or a ponzi scheme. Laws were deliberately ambiguous so white collars could claim that "they didn't mean for this to happen." The revolving door of business and lawyers into government and back put an end to prosecutions.

Don't expect an end to the ponzi schemes. Its the only way to future profits and bonuses. The public still believes in the "American dream" and capitalism. The entire world is held securely by the octopus of greed. Do not trust data or statistics- they are fantasies built on fairy tales and guaranteed by compromised rating and government agencies.

Every slogan has led to our current state: no interest cap, de-regulation, global trade, risk/reward, downsizing, outsourcing, free market, job creators, survival of the fittest.

So the academics have a lot of insights about the progression of greedy people pushing the envelope until they shredded it. The book will confirm what you already know or suspect.
Vispel
Years ago I read Diane Francis’ Contrepreneurs and forever have been amazed by brilliant people who could have made money in very legal ways but go another direction. It seems as the 2000s have been rife with these types of folks and their corporate shenanigans (even though this period is not unique in history…unfortunately). This book is actually a collection of essays from an international team of scholars with backgrounds in criminology, sociology, economics, business, government regulation, and law who examine the historical, social, and cultural causes of the 2008 economic crisis. I would like to have learned more about individual motivation because assigning it solely as greed is relevant but oversimplified.