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Download The No-Cry Sleep Solution for Toddlers and Preschoolers: Gentle Ways to Stop Bedtime Battles and Improve Your Child's Sleep ePub

by Harvey Karp,Elizabeth Pantley

Download The No-Cry Sleep Solution for Toddlers and Preschoolers: Gentle Ways to Stop Bedtime Battles and Improve Your Child's Sleep ePub
  • ISBN 0071444912
  • ISBN13 978-0071444910
  • Language English
  • Author Harvey Karp,Elizabeth Pantley
  • Publisher McGraw-Hill Education; 1 edition (May 16, 2005)
  • Pages 396
  • Formats lrf txt mobi azw
  • Category Business
  • Subcategory Management and Leadership
  • Size ePub 1537 kb
  • Size Fb2 1524 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 220

Guaranteed to help parents reclaim sweet dreams for their entire family

New from the bestselling author of the classic baby sleep guide!

Getting babies to sleep through the night is one thing; getting willful toddlers and energetic preschoolers to sleep is another problem altogether. Written to help sleep-deprived parents of children ages one to five, The No-Cry Sleep Solution for Toddlers and Preschoolers offers loving solutions to help this active age-group get the rest they--and their parents--so desperately need.

A follow-up to Elizabeth Pantley's megahit The No-Cry Sleep Solution, this breakthrough guide is written in Pantley's trademark gentle, child-centered style. Parents will discover a wellspring of positive approaches to help their children get to bed, stay in bed, and sleep all night, without having to resort to punishments or other negative and ineffective measures. The No-Cry Sleep Solution for Toddlers and Preschoolers tackles many common nighttime obstacles, including:

Refusals to go to bed Night waking and early rising Reluctance to move out of the crib and into a big-kid bed Nighttime visits to the parents' bed Naptime problems Nightmares, "night terrors," and fears Special sleep issues of twins, special needs children, and adopted children Sleepwalking, sleep talking, snoring, and tooth grinding

Электронная книга "The No-Cry Sleep Solution for Toddlers and Preschoolers: Gentle Ways to Stop Bedtime Battles and Improve Your Child’s Sleep: Foreword by Dr. Harvey Karp", Elizabeth Pantley. Getting babies to sleep through the night is one thing; getting willful toddlers and energetic preschoolers to sleep is another problem altogether. Written to help sleep-deprived parents of children ages one to five, The No-Cry Sleep Solution for Toddlers and Preschoolers offers loving solutions to help this active age-group get the rest they-and their parents-so desperately need.

A follow-up to Elizabeth Pantley's megahit The No-Cry Sleep Solution, this breakthrough guide is written in Pantley's trademark gentle, child-centered style. Parents will discover a wellspring of positive approaches to help their children get to bed, stay in bed, and sleep all night, without having to resort to punishments or other negative and ineffective measures

Elizabeth Pantley gets dozens of e-mails daily about her bestselling sleep book, The No-Cry Sleep Solution

Elizabeth Pantley gets dozens of e-mails daily about her bestselling sleep book, The No-Cry Sleep Solution. No-Cry Sleep covered babies up to age two, but many of the parents are asking what to do about older children who are being awakened by a baby's cries, refusing to go to bed or to stay in bed, having nightmares, or getting into the parents' bed at night

Written to help sleep-deprived parents of children ages one to five, this guide offers loving solutions to help this active age-group get the rest they-and their parents-so desperately need. 18 people like this topic.

Written to help sleep-deprived parents of children ages one to five, this guide offers loving solutions to help this active age-group get the rest they-and their parents-so desperately need.

TODDLER SLEEP(Night Weaning, NO Cry It Out, and Naps) . Watch Dr. Harvey Karp In Action - Продолжительность: 2:26 Happiest Baby Recommended for you. 2:26.

TODDLER SLEEP(Night Weaning, NO Cry It Out, and Naps) - Продолжительность: 12:24 heidikimTV Recommended for you. 12:24. How To Get Your Baby To Quickly Fall Back To Sleep - Elizabeth Pantley - Продолжительность: 1:54 Kids In The House Recommended for you. 1:54.

Your Child's Sleep : Foreword by Dr. Harvey Karp .

The No-Cry Sleep Solution for Toddlers and Preschoolers: Gentle Ways to Stop Bedtime Battles and Improve Your Child's Sleep : Foreword by Dr.

Pantley Elizabeth (EN). Guaranteed to help parents reclaim sweet dreams for their entire family New from the bestselling author of the classic baby sleep guide!

Pantley Elizabeth (EN). Guaranteed to help parents reclaim sweet dreams for their entire family New from the bestselling author of the classic baby sleep guide! Getting babies to sleep through the night is one thing; getting willful toddlers and energetic preschoolers to sleep is another problem altogether.

Elizabeth pantley is famous for her pantley pull of method in her original book and she had some good ideas in this one too, especially for tackling specific situations like easing a toddler off night time breastfeeding. cough::, the book does not feel like it tackles sleep from the perspective that the parent child relationship should be adversarial when it comes to sleep. Its not the me against baby mentality that feels so wrong in some other books, even if they are often covered by humor.

Getting babies to sleep through the night is one thing; getting willful toddlers and energetic preschoolers to sleep is another problem altogether. Written to help sleep-deprived parents of children ages one to five, The No-Cry Sleep Solution for Toddlers and Preschoolers offers loving solutions to help this active age-group get the rest the-and their parents-so desperately need. A follow-up to Elizabeth Pantley's megahit The No-Cry Sleep Solution, this breakthrough guide is written in Pantley's trademark gentle, child-centered style

Talk about The No-Cry Sleep Solution for Toddlers and Preschoolers: Gentle Ways to Stop Bedtime Battles and Improve Your Child's Sleep


Gardall
I really liked the take of this book....be calm, let the child lead, be calm, the child will not be ready until he/she is ready, be calm. Did I mention that a ton of this book is based on you? Like I said I did like the book, it was easy to read and made sense...EXCEPT if you have a totally stubborn child who absolutely refuses to go on the potty. There is no practicals on how to deal with problems like this. What do you do when your child is ready, but can not be bothered to stop playing? I think the book can be improved greatly by some practical answers other than maybe your child is not ready.
Yozshujind
I read "The no-cry sleep solution", and loved it, but I was needed something for my now toddler who is presenting a million new problems. The most wonderful thing about this book is that it asks you questions in a non-judgemental way that then allow you to assess your situation, and decide if you really need to make a change, then it gives you a variety of solutions. The author points out that there is no one size fits all solution, and then she goes on to give you many gentle and loving options. If the cry it out method worked for you, you wouldn't be reading this review, now would you??? I'm not aware of any sleep books that deal specifically with older children, other than this . All the ones I know of deal with 6 month old babies, and I found most to be unacceptable for a toddler dealing with separation anxiety. This book however, talks about many individual sleep problems including separation anxiety, how to move to their own bed, nightmares, waking too early, daylight savings time, teething, non-nappers, trips to the parent's bed... The list goes on and on. One more wonderful thing about this book is that the author did more of a scientific study on the matter. She interviewed over a 1000 families, and then had over 200 "test mommies" to work out her sleep theories. She also refers to the Sleep in America polls, and refers to the current leading sleep expert at Stanford (not Ferber). Instead of just giving her opinions on what worked for her own children (she has 4), she actually asks other families and does research. Despite my own personal objections to Ferberizing, she makes no judgements like that, everything she says is loving and encouraging.

Just for the record, you're not alone. Here's an excerpt from the book taken out of the Sleep in America Poll:

Toddlers wake up:

3 or more times a night (4%)

2 x a night (5%)

1 x a night (38%)

in other words, 47% of toddlers wake up at least once per night and need a parent to fall back asleep. This is including all sleep techniques.

Preschoolers:

3 or more times a night (2%)

2 x a night (3%)

1 x a night (31%)

in other words, 36% of preschoolers wake up at least once per night and need a parent to fall back asleep.

She then goes on to say that "it is perfectly natural, absolutely normal, and totally expected for your toddler or preschooler to wake up in the night and need your help to fall back asleep. Sleeping all through the night, every night, without needing a parent's assistance is like learning to walk or talk or drink from a cup - all kids get there, but they do so at their own speed, a little at a time, and in their own unique way. I promise I won't leave you dangling there, just because something is normal doesn't mean you have to simply live with it until things change on their own."

I won't lie, if you want immediate results in a matter of days, this is not the book for you. However, if you'd like to teach your child to sleep in a loving, gentle, compassionate (and thus slow) way, this book will help you get there. I've been practicing the ideas in this book for a few days, and already I'm seeing some improvements. It has many creative ways to communicate with your child your wishes for sleep. Like - make a book with pictures of your bedtime routine, and a picture of your child sleeping in his own crib, then cuddled by his parents in the morning...

Good luck, and hope you get to sleeping better!

-Charis
Prince Persie
As someone with a master’s degree in social work, an infant/toddler child development associate credential, and a child care director’s credential, I have spent years learning about children and families. As a former early childhood education director and teacher; child protective services caseworker; and family-based, in-home therapist, I have spent years working with children and families. Sleep, mostly the lack there of, is an issue for so many parents and their children. Yet, it seems as if no one talks about sleep issues after the newborn period, as if every young baby seamlessly transitions into going to bed easily and sleeping through the night. When I had my daughter fourteen months ago (and became a stay-at-home mom), I hoped that she would sleep well and for the first few months it wasn’t too difficult, as she started sleeping for longer stretches of time. Then, at three months, everything fell apart. She began waking constantly, only going back to sleep if nursed, and screaming if placed in her crib. We tried various ways to get her to go to and stay asleep short of the cry-it-out method, which neither my husband nor I support (but nearly everyone we know said we should do). We ended up co-sleeping, with our daughter still waking up a few times per night and nursing back to sleep. Although we are all getting more rest this way, it is not ideal, as she is still relying on nursing to fall asleep and to fall back asleep. For more ideas, I chose to read Elizabeth Pantley’s “The No Cry Sleep Solution for Toddlers and Preschoolers” as I have previously read a few of her other books and found them to be well-written, practical, and informative. One of the best things about her books is that they show parents that they are not alone. In addition, parents are reassured that there is no one solution that works for every child and family (as many parents and “experts” would have you believe) and that there is nothing wrong with not wanting to sleep train your child (again, as many others insist must be done). In this book, Elizabeth provides information about sleep and common-sense ideas about how to develop a consistent bedtime routine and a comfortable sleep environment. Then, she tackles different sleep issues from children who fight bedtime and/or need a parent’s help to sleep to toddlers and preschoolers who experience bad dreams or wet the bed. The “Nighttime Nursling” chapter was the one I zeroed in on! We are working on a plan using ideas from the book that will, gently, help our daughter to learn to rely less on nursing to sleep. I would recommend other parents who want to help themselves and their children get more rest to read Elizabeth’s book and make a plan that will work for their families.