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Download Little Bets: How Big Ideas Emerge from Small Discoveries ePub

by Peter Sims

Download Little Bets: How Big Ideas Emerge from Small Discoveries ePub
  • ISBN 1847940471
  • ISBN13 978-1847940476
  • Language English
  • Author Peter Sims
  • Publisher Random House Business Books (May 1, 2011)
  • Pages 224
  • Formats lrf mbr txt mobi
  • Category Business
  • Subcategory Small Business and Entrepreneurship
  • Size ePub 1175 kb
  • Size Fb2 1356 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 403

How can errors produce perfection? How can failure fuel ambition? And how can confusion enhance creativity? The answer: little bets. The little bets approach is about using negativity to positive effect. If your plans fall apart, refine them; if you don't know where best to begin, just begin somewhere. Every decision is a risk: take a chance and see what happens. In "Little Bets", leading business consultant Peter Sims turns problems on their heads and outlines a counter-intuitive path to perfection. Using real-life case studies from the worlds of business, design, warfare and even comedy, he shows that it can be more rational to act first and think later, more efficient to fail and find out what doesn't work. It's a flexible philosophy that has both saved corporate giants such as Apple and Pixar and inspired the third-world microfinancing industry. When success is the only acceptable outcome, "Little Bets" advocates a bold and radical approach in which failure is good, questions are solutions, and excellence is not a means but an end.

Peter Sims' exciting new book, "Little Bets", is replete with stunning insights about innovation and the remarkable benefits of backing many creative initiatives that yield the big breakthrough. Corporate leaders everywhere can benefit from his sound advice.

Peter Sims' exciting new book, "Little Bets", is replete with stunning insights about innovation and the remarkable benefits of backing many creative initiatives that yield the big breakthrough. -Bill George, Professor, Harvard Business School and Author, True North. 'Little Bets' is a big idea.

Bestselling author Peter Sims found that rather than start with a big idea or plan a whole project in advance, they make a methodical series of little bets, learning critical information from lots of little failures and from small but significant wins.

start with a big idea or plan a whole project in advance, they make a methodical series of little bets. 201 GREAT IDEAS FOR YOUR SMALL BUSINESS by Jane Applegate. I wish I had this kind of invaluable. Fast, Fresh Garden Edibles: Quick Crops for Small Spaces. Breakthrough Branding: How Smart Entrepreneurs and Intrapreneurs Transform a Small Idea into a Big. 289 Pages·2012·1. 55 MB·921 Downloads·New! From the grassroots growth of beverage brands like Red Bull, and Honest Tea, to the exploding. Encyclopedia of Foods. A Guide to Healthy Nutrition. 89 MB·36,977 Downloads·New!

How did Pixar go from producing CAT scan images to winning Oscars? How did Steve Jobs turn Apple into a world-beating company? . The answer, according to renowned business thought-leader Peter Sims, is LITTLE BETS.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Bestselling author Peter Sims found that rather than start with a big idea or plan a whole project in advance, they make a methodical series of little bets, learning critical information from lots of little failures and from small but significant wins.

Q: What is a "little bet"? A: A little bet is a low-risk action taken to discover, develop, and test an idea

Peter Sims Explains How Little Bets Spur Big Creative Successes Beautiful Minds, Scientific.

Peter Sims Explains How Little Bets Spur Big Creative Successes Beautiful Minds, Scientific. Little Bets and Black Sheep with Peter Sims.

ABOUT THE BOOK: Name: Little Bets: How breakthrough ideas emerge .

Overview: Today’s book belongs to my favourite genre ‘creativity and innovation’. The name of the book is Little Bets: How Breakthrough Ideas Emerge from Small Discoveries. written by Peter Sims

I liked this book for it's acknowledgement that big vision needs a starting place. And that starting place should be a low risk.

I liked this book for it's acknowledgement that big vision needs a starting place. The bigger the roll out, the more difficult it is to respond to feedback and alter the direction.

Talk about Little Bets: How Big Ideas Emerge from Small Discoveries


Maveri
I am a student at the University of Baltimore and I had to read this book for a survey entrepreneurship class. I will have to say the book started off pretty decent. It had a good introduction on how Chris Rock prepared for his comedy shows. The books running theme was you learn while doing, but also while failing. A lot of the examples used mentioned how there were several experiments done and mistakes made before they reached their ultimate goal. The book was short but seemed wordy, not a very interesting read but a necessary one for entrepreneurs. The story of Pixar was the most interesting. Pixar had several small wins and even though they had some major flops, they were still able to keep reinventing themselves until they had their breakthrough with animation. I think the author did a great job at delivering the realities of starting a business. He made it a point to mention, through several examples, that it is not all about the large wins, and that sometimes you have to accept small victories and keep progressing forward. He also suggest that setbacks and failures are all a part of the process. I think the book is a good book to read for future entrepreneurs who are finding it hard to find their breakthrough. His emphasis on the experimenting and innovation being key in the success of the business was also a key message throughout the book. The book is definitely geared towards innovative, creative and resourceful individuals who are interested in starting their own business.
Flarik
When I was first assigned this book, I was a bit hesitant about the content and what it could offer me. As a young entrepreneur, there are always some parts of doubt we have with ideas and the contents that could make or break us. Aspiring entrepreneurs and even existing entrepreneurs should look into it. I learned interesting information about Steve Jobs and Chris Rock that I wasn’t aware of. I have a better appreciation of their crafts and what it took to get where they are today. You will learn to appreciate your failures because they make for a better story and good feedback to fix what wasn’t right in the first place. From learning how militant individuals make their strategic moves with different approaches to conquer constraints in the war. Throughout the book you learn that some people depend on luck like Tim Russert’s experience to the big screen with “Meet the Press”. He believed he could “learn a lit bit from a whole lot of people.” His Knowledge that he learned along the way and persistence got him where he is today. There wasn’t anything that I didn’t like about this book. Which is a first for me due to the fact that I don’t usually engage in personal reading outside of assignments. It made me want to reach out and look for more books to prepare me mentally.
I am a current student at University of Baltimore taking Entrepreneurship course and this was my recommended reading.
Kulafyn
"The writers for the humor publication the Onion, known for its hilarious headlines, propose roughly six hundred possibilities for eighteen headlines each week," reports Peter Sims in his fascinating book, Little Bets. That's just a three percent success rate for headline writers. Yikes. Or maybe not yikes.

Subtitled, "How Breakthrough Ideas Emerge From Small Discoveries," we quickly learn--through dozens of mini-case studies--that innovation comes through hard work, experimentation and bosses who are cheerleaders for failure. (And I would also guess innovation happens with a healthy dose of weekly staff encouragement, motivation and hoopla-type fun. I mean, what if your best headline ideas were ranked 19th each week?)

Example: Comedian Chris Rock tests, tests and re-tests every joke--and every word--for up to six months (or even a year) at his local comedy club before he takes his hour-long act on the road or on national television.

Example: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has built an "experimental discovery mentality" so that "whether or not employees are doing so is a part of their performance reviews."

The author adds, "Like Chris Rock, Bezos has accepted uncertainty; he knows that he cannot reliably predict which ideas for new markets will work and which won't. He's got to experiment. One such example is a feature the company launched that would compare a customer's entire purchase history with its millions of other customers in order to find the one person with the closest matching history. In one click, Amazon would show you what items that customer purchased.

"`No one used it,' Bezos has said. `Our history is full of things like that, where we came up with an innovation that we thought was really cool, and the customers didn't care.'"

It's all about making a series of little bets--not one humongous bet--just little ones with the hope that just a couple will pay big dividends. "Experimental innovators like Rock, Brin and Page, Bezos, and Beethoven don't analyze new ideas too much too soon, try to hit narrow targets on unknown horizons, or put their hopes into one big bet. Instead of trying to develop elaborate plans to predict the success of their endeavors, they do things to discover what they should do. They have all attained extraordinary success by making a series of little bets."

The book surprised me. I expected cute little success stories like, "Well...I just flipped the spaghetti onto the wall--and it stuck!" Instead, the innovators of little experiments were actually productive creative teams of "rigorous, highly analytical, strategic and pragmatic" people. There are no step-by-step formulas.

Instead, there is a focus on five fundamentals: 1) Experiment (fail quickly to learn fast); 2) Play (a fun environment never snuffs out or prematurely judges the ideas--the case study on Pixar is amazing); 3) Immerse (get out with customers and learn from the ground up); 4) Reorient (make small wins and necessary pivots); and 5) Iterate (repeat, refine and test frequently).

Caution though: this approach is a 180 plunge from what the profs taught us. He quotes Sir Ken Robinson, "We are educating people out of their creativity." Plus, most management approaches are all about reducing errors and risk--not giving license to having a good whack at a half-baked idea. Goodness, this is God's money we're wasting!

So...is this just one more niche business book--a good read, a few memorable stories--and then back to real-life-in-the-trenches? Hopefully, no. Leverage the insights of Little Bets in your planning process--with one mega-caveat. "The fact is that much of what we would like to be able to predict is unpredictable. Global market movements, political and cultural complexities, and demographic shifts constantly reshape the ground beneath us. This certainty of uncertainty is becoming ever more evident with the accelerating pace of technological change. The Internet has reduced communications barriers and allows new players from different corners of the world to rapidly emerge and compete globally. Thus a key flaw with the top-down, central planning approach is how limited it is in allowing us to be limber and able to discover new ways of doing things."

Yikes...I've exceeded my prudent word limit--but I have another 100 paragraphs or whole pages of Little Bets highlighted you'll have to discover for yourself. BTW, I read this on my new Amazon Kindle--and love the highlighting and note-making options. Perfect for airplanes; but not as easy to pass around the room during my workshops and board consultations! I'm still undecided about it.