derrierloisirs.fr
» » Nonprofit Nation: A New Look at the Third America

Download Nonprofit Nation: A New Look at the Third America ePub

by Michael O'Neill

Download Nonprofit Nation: A New Look at the Third America ePub
  • ISBN 0787954144
  • ISBN13 978-0787954147
  • Language English
  • Author Michael O'Neill
  • Publisher Jossey-Bass; Revised edition (June 15, 2002)
  • Pages 336
  • Formats mbr txt rtf lit
  • Category Business
  • Subcategory Small Business and Entrepreneurship
  • Size ePub 1200 kb
  • Size Fb2 1191 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 955

Coupon

Michael O'Neill has written a Baedeker for the nonprofit world.

Michael O'Neill has written a Baedeker for the nonprofit world. No traveler should leave home without having read i. - -Leslie Lenkowsky, professor, Center on Philanthropy, Indiana University.

Identifying and examining the major nonprofit subsectors-health care, arts, social service, and religious organizations, for example-and detailing their particular concerns and impact enable O'Neill to explore their influence on business, government and society.

Nonprofit Nation book.

Looks like you are currently in Russia but have requested a page in the United States site. Would you like to change to the United States site? NO.

Recently Viewed and Featured. Nonprofit Nation: A New Look at the Third America. Thinking About Almost Everything: New Ideas to Light up Minds. Shelley (Longman Critical Readers).

Nonprofit Nation: A New Look at the Third America. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2002. Mutual Benefit Organizations. In Dwight F. Burlingame (e., Philanthropy in America: A Comprehensive Historical Encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, C. ABC-CLIO, 2004, vol. 2, pp. 324-329. Responsible Management in the Nonprofit Sector. In Virginia A. Hodgkinson, Richard W. Lyman, and Associates, The Future of the Nonprofit Sector: Challenges, Changes, and Policy Considerations, pp. 261-274. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1989. An Interview with Harold M. Williams. Nonprofit Management and Leadership, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Fall 1990), 69-74.

O Neill is the author or coauthor of numerous books, including The Third America and Women and Power in the Nonprofit Sector, both from Jossey Bass

O Neill is the author or coauthor of numerous books, including The Third America and Women and Power in the Nonprofit Sector, both from Jossey Bass. Country of Publication.

Michael O'Neill, American management educator. Teaching fellow Harvard University, 1965-1967. 1989-1992; board directors National Academy Centers Council, 1989-2000.

Nonprofit Nation: A New Look at the Third America (Hardback). Michael O'Neill has written a Baedeker for the nonprofit world. -

Nonprofit Nation: A New Look at the Third America (Hardback). Professor Michael O'Neill (author). Hardback 336 Pages, Published: 19/06/2002. This is one book that everyoneconcerned with American nonprofits and philanthropy should read tounderstand the nonprofit sector as a whole. - -Leslie Lenkowsky, professor, Center on Philanthropy, IndianaUniversity

Talk about Nonprofit Nation: A New Look at the Third America


lets go baby
This is a great introductory resource to the nonprofit sector, and specifically, the subsectors within the field. For the reviewer that gave 1 star, due to what he describes as out of date statistics, you probably didn't read the book. That is because most of the statistics are used to show consistent trends in the sectors--it's the type of publication that could probably be updated every 10 years, but the stats are accurate and easy to read and use. I think this text would ring true to nonprofit professionals, and give some insight to folks considering a career in the field. It provides good historical and contemporary info on the fields, it's a straightforward and easy read, and it's a must for professionals in the nonprofit field. I think it would also be helpful to board members--especially new board members.
Yanki
Had to read this book for a graduate class. It was a decent enough read but I wish there was a more relevant updated version available as most of the data and examples are about 15 years old. I would agree with another reviewer and think that it would be great to use this book to look at trends in the nonprofit sector as we entered the new millennium. It also has a good list of references at the end to refer to for further research. Overall, I think this book does a fairly good job providing a representation of the nonprofit sector then and now and I expect I will be referring back to it for concepts and ideas in the future.
Isha
Could have described that it is not the book in the picture. I paid for the book in the picture, and received a book with a weird blue cover instead.
Eseve
This book does a great job of answering basic questions about nonprofits and the nonprofit sector. It also analyzes each segment of the nonprofit sector and brings out some key data and observations about each one. Finally, it seeks to look into the future of nonprofits. Anyone interested in the sector, and especially nonprofit executive directors, consultants, and others who should be involved in global nonprofit strategy will find this book to be a valuable resource.

The first striking lesson I learned from Dr. O'Neill's book is that, while the nonprofit sector has been growing significantly in the past 30 years, in many ways it has just kept pace with the rest of the economy. Personal, corporate, and foundation giving are remarkably stable, and the percentage of charity dollars given by donors to segments such as education, health care, the arts, and international causes have remained constant since the 1970s. Even the growth in the number of new nonprofits seeking IRS recognition has been relatively constant (in percentage terms) since at least the early 1980s.

The dollar totals change, but the percentages are constant. Knowing this prompts important questions about how charities plan, how and whether they solicit for funds, and where likely support is to be found for new initiatives.

Dr. O'Neill doesn't shrink from acknowledging the vast amount we don't know about the nonprofit sector. Anyone analyzing the data recognize that policymakers and researchers alike are making best guesses rather than reaching definite conclusions in many areas of analysis. We're a long way from having "census" data on the nonprofit sector.

There are almost 1 million charities recognized by the IRS, but we don't know for sure how many are active and how many are defunct. There are almost 2 million nonprofits of all types (charities plus churches, labor unions, chambers of commerce, private clubs, etc.) that the IRS lists. The Form 990 returns -- that only IRS-recognized charities with revenue greater than $25,000 are required to file -- are works of interpretation by filers as well as researchers.

In fact, much nonprofit activity occurs outside record-keeping capabilities. Giving a friend's child the money to attend college, organizing a softball team, or countless other activities never reach the level of IRS recognition, much less scrutiny. We can study what we know, and guess about the rest based on other data sources.

Dr. O'Neill has done an admirable job of interpreting these other sources, adding the IRS and other government data, and presenting a plausible picture of the nonprofit economy.
Priotian
Don't waste your time! If you want to read a boring, poorly researched book of statistics at least four years old, then I suggest you buy it. But the statistics are even out of date. If you have lived on this planet for a few years, you already know about the examples he uses. Pathetic writing. If for some reason the examples are new to you don't trust them. He says Ralph Nader advocated for a safer Chevrolet Corvette. If the author doesn't know it was a Chevrolet Corvair, then he is clueless! Read Greater Good by Claire Gaudiani if you want to learn something.
Wafi
This is a fantastic book. It is filled with thought provoking statistics and charts, accompanied by an easy to read history of the multi-faceted nonprofit sector.