derrierloisirs.fr
» » Tigger Comes to the Forest (Winnie-the-Pooh)

Download Tigger Comes to the Forest (Winnie-the-Pooh) ePub

by A. A. Milne

Download Tigger Comes to the Forest (Winnie-the-Pooh) ePub
  • ISBN 0416171222
  • ISBN13 978-0416171228
  • Language English
  • Author A. A. Milne
  • Publisher Methuen (September 1, 1991)
  • Pages 32
  • Formats mobi lrf lrf mbr
  • Category Children
  • Subcategory Animals
  • Size ePub 1341 kb
  • Size Fb2 1957 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 601

This is part of a collection of 20 books featuring the stories of Winnie-The-Pooh, Eeyore, Christopher Robin, Tigger, Piglet, Kanga and Roo. Other titles in this series include "Eeyore Loses a Tail", "A House is Built at Pooh Corner" and "A Search is Organized".

Start by marking Tigger Comes to the Forest: Winnie-the-Pooh Easy-to-Read as Want to Read . And every spread of these inviting books features full-color Ernest Shepard illustrations.

Start by marking Tigger Comes to the Forest: Winnie-the-Pooh Easy-to-Read as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In Tigger Comes to the Forest, Pooh tries to help Tigger figure out what Tiggers like for breakfast. with a very surprising result! Get A Copy.

An excerpt from A A Milne's famous children's novel, Winnie the Pooh.

So Winnie-the-Pooh went round to his friend Christopher Robin, who lived behind a green door in another part of the Forest. Good morning, Christopher Robin," he said.

This evening -. "What about a story?" said Christopher Robin. So Winnie-the-Pooh went round to his friend Christopher Robin, who lived behind a green door in another part of the Forest. Good morning, Winnie-ther-Pooh," said you.

Winnie the Pooh: Piglet Meets a Heffalump (Dramatised). Narrated by: Stephen Fry, Jane Horrocks, Geffrey Palmer, and others. Length: 1 hr and 2 mins. The Wombles is the first ever Wombles book and introduces the stern but kindly Great Uncle Bulgaria; Orinoco, who is particularly fond of his food and a subsequent 40 winks; general handyman extraordinaire Tobermory, who can turn almost anything that the Wombles retrieve from Wimbledon Common into something useful; Madame Cholet, who cooks the most delicious and natural foods to keep the Wombles.

Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too is a 1974 animated featurette from Walt Disney Productions

Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too is a 1974 animated featurette from Walt Disney Productions. It was directed by John Lounsbery, produced by Wolfgang Reitherman, and released on December 20, 1974 as a double feature with the live-action feature film The Island at the Top of the World. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film, but lost to Closed Mondays. It was later added as a segment to the 1977 film The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh.

Winnie-the-Pooh (1926) is the first volume of stories about Winnie-the-Pooh, written by A. A. Milne and illustrated by E. H. Shepard

Winnie-the-Pooh (1926) is the first volume of stories about Winnie-the-Pooh, written by A. Shepard. The book focuses on the adventures of a teddy bear called Winnie-the-Pooh and his friends Piglet, a small toy pig; Eeyore, a toy donkey; Owl, a live owl; and Rabbit, a live rabbit. The characters of Kanga, a toy kangaroo, and her son Roo are introduced later in the book, in the chapter entitled "In Which Kanga and Baby Roo Come to the Forest and Piglet has a Bath"

Since 1926, Winnie-the-Pooh and his friends-Piglet, Owl, Tigger, Kanga, Roo, and the ever doleful Eeyore-have endured as the unforgettable creations of A. Milne, who wrote two books of Pooh's adventures for his so. .

Since 1926, Winnie-the-Pooh and his friends-Piglet, Owl, Tigger, Kanga, Roo, and the ever doleful Eeyore-have endured as the unforgettable creations of A. Milne, who wrote two books of Pooh's adventures for his son, Christopher Robin, and Ernest H. Shepard, who lovingly gave them shape through his iconic and beautiful illustrations. The texts are complete and unabridged, and all of the illustrations, each gloriously recolored, are included.

Winnie-the-Pooh read the two notices very carefully, first from left to right, and afterwards, in case he had missed some of it.

Winnie-the-Pooh read the two notices very carefully, first from left to right, and afterwards, in case he had missed some of it, from right to left. Then, to make quite sure, he knocked and pulled the knocker, and he pulled and knocked the bell-rope, and he called out in a very loud voice, ‘Owl! I require an answer! It’s Bear speaking. And then, just as they came to the Six Pine Trees, Pooh looked round to see that nobody else was listening, and said in a very solemn voice: ‘Piglet, I have decided something. ‘What have you decided, Pooh?’

Talk about Tigger Comes to the Forest (Winnie-the-Pooh)


Nafyn
Very pleased with the book and customer service. The extra attention given was very appreciated.
Levaq
When I went to introduce my preschooler to Winnie-the-Pooh, I bought the big book with the complete stories and poems. It didn't take long for me to figure out that it wasn't quite right for my 3-year-old. Reading a story out of the original works takes a good 15-20 minutes, which is more than one can really expect from a preschooler or toddler. Also, the original Pooh is a bit like Sesame Street, in that there are phrases and indeed entire sections of the stories that adults will find amusing but which will just go over a child's head.

And yet, I didn't want to break down and go the route of the Disney-fied Pooh books, with their cartoonish illustrations and watered-down plots and characters.

That's why I was so pleased to find the Easy-to-Read series. There are six easy-to-read titles from two publishers. They are:

Winnie-the-Pooh and Some Bees
Pooh Goes Visiting
Eeyore Has a Birthday
Tigger Comes to the Forest
Christopher Robin Leads an Expedition
Pooh Invents a New Game

Each book is based on one chapter from the complete works. These little books are divided into four chapters, although it should be no problem to read one from start to finish in one sitting.

The print is large and well spaced, and there are ample illustrations (the original drawings by E.H. Shepard) on every page spread to keep little eyes engaged in the story. Most important, the editor has removed most of the passages that aren't so kid friendly and has simplified the stories without giving them a Disney style candy coating. One could read the original story and then the easy-to-read version and get the same basic plot; when going from the Milne works to the Disney versions, the same is certainly not true.

I didn't give these books five stars because the editor retained some language and dialogue that may be a bit confusing for children in the intended age range. Nevertheless, these books are a wonderful introduction to a classic cast of characters for the preschool set.
Snowskin
After my introduction to this ensemble cast with "Pooh Goes Visiting," I looked forward to the rest of the series. But this one is a bit of a let-down. Be warned that the stories are, or seem to be, out of sequence. Contrary to the title, only two, I think, are about or even contain Tigger. And the voice of Tigger is REALLY annoying. Really. But the rest of the cast continues to bring a gentle wonderfulness to the Pooh stories -- so much so that it's well worth the annoyance of Tigger. Get this one, but don't miss the other, better ones.
Cobyno
This is another beautiful story set from the series, but I have to admit that the voice of tigger is a bit annoying, other than that we still like it and it is definitely worth buying it, ...even if you prefer to skip the stories including tigger.
CopamHuk
This was an instant success with my 4 1/2 year old son. He listens to audiobooks often and tends to request the cd's from this series mor than any others.
Shazel
I love these tapes. My preschooler loves these tapes and has since age 2 or so. My sister gave them to me because she and her kids love these tapes. First of all, Winnie the Pooh is simply the best toddler/preschool character out there, as he's funny and not scary or naughty, (or loud), and they use lots of words and do things which are new and fun and interesting for your toddler/ preschooler. Second, this dramatization is unbelievably good--entertaining to adults as well as kids, the perfect mix of humor and gentleness. Another reviewer has said Tigger is annoying--I completely disagree. Tigger is FINE. I wonder if this reviewer has encountered Disney Tigger--now there's annoying! We have taken these tapes everywhere and now of course have lost or broken most of them so I HAVE TO buy some more. There are alot of books and tapes out there you can take out of the library--JUST BUY THESE
Todal
[This is a review of the Hodder/Headline audiocassette version] I learned to read by listening (again and again and again and again) to a pair of well-loved and well-worn LPs of the Pooh stories read by Maurice Evans. I always considered them the finest Pooh audiobooks ever recorded. Up until now! Now there's this wonderful series of fully-dramatized adventures of Pooh featuring a brilliant cast of wonderful British actors: Stephen Fry ("Jeeves and Wooster") as Pooh, Geoffrey Palmer ("The Madness of King George") as Eeyore, Judy Dench ("Shakespeare in Love") as Kanga...and best of all, the *incomparable* Jane Horrocks ("Little Voice" and Bubbles from "AbFab") as a squeaky, alarmed, and altogether adorable Piglet. You don't have to be a kid to appreciate these fine recordings (and there are plenty of adult Pooh fans out there who will *love* these versions). Accept no substitutes: this is simply the finest Pooh audio series yet created, beating by a *far* distance the Alan Bennett and (ugh!) Charles Kuralt versions. There's more than just this one tape in the series, too. The series includes "Tigger Comes to the Forest" (ISBN: 1840322195); "Piglet Meets a Heffalump" (ISBN: 1840320524) and "Pooh Invents a New Game" (ISBN: 1840322268). Type the 10-digit ISBN number into the Amazon search field to go directly to the webpages for these cassettes.