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Download Everything On a Waffle ePub

by Polly Horvath

Download Everything On a Waffle ePub
  • ISBN 0786248327
  • ISBN13 978-0786248322
  • Language English
  • Author Polly Horvath
  • Publisher Thorndike Press; 1 edition (December 15, 2002)
  • Pages 173
  • Formats doc docx lrf azw
  • Category Children
  • Subcategory Growing Up and Facts of Life
  • Size ePub 1144 kb
  • Size Fb2 1145 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 583

A New York Times BestsellerA Newbery Honor Book 2002

Primrose simply knows her parents did not perish at sea, but can't convince the other residents of Coal Harbour. But true sanctuary can always be found at a restaurant called The Girl on the Red Swing, where everything, including lasagna is served on a waffle.


on a Waffle' is the Newberry Honour book by Polly Horvath. I read this book as a part of my Printz/Newberry kick. I loved the title, and thought it had an interesting premise about a girl whose parents recently vanished (suspected dead)

on a Waffle' is the Newberry Honour book by Polly Horvath. I loved the title, and thought it had an interesting premise about a girl whose parents recently vanished (suspected dead). But in reading & on a Waffle' I found myself somewhat let-down by Horvath's avoidance of the heavier topics hinted at in the blurb. Primrose Squarp is a wonderful character (and has a cool name!)

Everything on a Waffle. Polly Horvath has written many books for children and young adults

Everything on a Waffle. When the Circus Came to Town. Polly Horvath has written many books for children and young adults. She has won numerous awards including a National Book Award, Newbery Honor, Toronto Dominion Award, International White Raven, Canadian Library Association's Young Adult Book of the Year, short-listed for Germany's most prestigious literature award, the Deutscher, the Writer's Trust Vicky Metcalfe Award for her body of work, and many others. Her books have been New York Times and Publishers Weekly bestsellers and Rosie O'Donell and Oprah picks.

Everything on a Waffle is a 2001 bestselling children's novel, written by Polly Horvath and published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. The book was critically acclaimed and won a variety of awards, including the 2002 Newbery Honor

Everything on a Waffle is a 2001 bestselling children's novel, written by Polly Horvath and published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. The book was critically acclaimed and won a variety of awards, including the 2002 Newbery Honor. A sequel, One Year in Coal Harbour, was published in 2012. Everything on a Waffle, set in a small Canadian of Coal Harbor fishing village, tells the story of an eleven-year-old girl named Primrose Squarp. One night, a storm hits their town

47 quotes from Polly Horvath: 'The library in summer is the most wonderful thing because there you get books on any subject and read them each for . I hover on the extremities. Polly Horvath, Everything on a Waffle. Yesterday I was so full of hope.

47 quotes from Polly Horvath: 'The library in summer is the most wonderful thing because there you get books on any subject and read them each for . My life seemed blessed, full of adventures and answered prayers, and now something very, very bad has happened and it will never be the same again. And it all happened because I was greedy. Because I couldn't have an ordinary life.

Polly Horvath is one of the most highly acclaimed authors writing today.

Polly Horvath is one of the most highly acclaimed authors writing today

Everything on a Waffle is a 2001 Boston Globe - Horn Book Award Honor Book for Fiction and Poetry and a 2002 . Horvath delivers another hilariously puckish read with this tale of a (possibly) orphaned girl from a small Canadian fishing village.

Everything on a Waffle is a 2001 Boston Globe - Horn Book Award Honor Book for Fiction and Poetry and a 2002 Newbery Honor Book. Newbery Honor Book, ALA Notable Children's Books, Child Magazine Best Books of the Year, Boston Globe – Horn Book Award, Honor Books, NYPLC Children's Books 100, Boston Globe-Horn Bk Award, Honor Bk. Connect with the author.

Talk about Everything On a Waffle


Flamehammer
My 5th grade daughter was made to read this book by her reading teacher. Perhaps it's because she did not choose the book herself, but she really did not like this book. She repeatedly said it was boring and characters did not show much emotion. She also said it was confusing at many points. I read a chapter aloud to her one night and I actually did find the narrative a bit confusing and found myself rereading a few sentences.
Thomeena
Primrose Squarp is busy believing in the unbelievable.

Primrose's mother and father are lost at sea - and Primrose has been living with her babysitter, Miss Perfidy ever since the wild storm that (supposedly) carried them away. But then her Uncle Jack arrives in the town of Coal Harbour, to become Primrose's guardian.

Uncle Jack leaves the navy to come and live with Primrose (and start a housing development in the picturesque town) - but Primrose expects the arrangement will only be a temporary one - because she is certain that her parents are alive. Primrose is positively certain that her mother and father are sitting huddled on an island somewhere, deciding how to return to their daughter.

In the mean time, Primrose loses a toe and hangs out at `The Girl in the Swing' and gets cooking tips from Miss Bowzer, who his fending-off Uncle Jack's offers to buy the place out.

It's just a matter of time before Primrose's parents return, and everybody in Coal Harbour who thinks Primrose is in grief-denial will be proven wrong, and showed the power behind positive thinking. . .

`Everything on a Waffle' is the Newberry Honour book by Polly Horvath.

I read this book as a part of my Printz/Newberry kick. I loved the title, and thought it had an interesting premise about a girl whose parents recently vanished (suspected dead). But in reading `Everything on a Waffle' I found myself somewhat let-down by Horvath's avoidance of the heavier topics hinted at in the blurb. . .

Primrose Squarp is a wonderful character (and has a cool name!). She's very upbeat in the wake of tragedy; a perpetually sunny, optimistic little sweetheart whose faith in her family is unwavering. Throughout the book Primrose gives recipes for the various foods and delicacies that she mentions throughout her adventures in Coal Harbour. It's partly out of comfort that she recites these recipes for the reader - since many of them are meals her mother made. But the recipes also illustrate Primrose's deeper perceptions about the goings on around her, like this recipe for Caramel Apple;

** QUOTE **

Do not muck around with chocolate or nuts or anything else fancy that may tempt you. It will only gum up the works. Sometimes you get tempted to make something wonderful even better but in doing so you lose what was wonderful to begin with.

** QUOTE **

I really liked reading about the town of Coal Harbour and its residents. From the boastful-boring Ms. Honeycut, to forgetful Miss Perfidy. Horvath does a wonderful job of making the town a character unto itself - and I had no problems in believing that Uncle Jack would be trying to buy up real estate in the area.

What I struggled with in this book, was Horvath's reluctance to write the tragedy of Primrose's parents. Her father, a fisherman, was at sea in the middle of a terrible storm - and Primrose's mother took a little dinghy out to try and save him. Both were lost at sea, suspected dead by everyone (except Primrose). I thought the whole book would be about Primrose coming to terms with the truth of her parent's death. But Horvath isn't building up to that at all - instead she wraps things up nicely, and I had a small problem with that.

In reviewing this I'm thinking about the very sad news of Maurice Sendak's death. I read a great article about the author of `Where the Wild Things Are' in The Age. This article discusses how Sendak's life was affected by the Holocaust; his brother joined the army, and many of Sendak's European relatives were captured and killed. As a result of encountering death and brutality so early on in life, Sendak said "It forced me to take children to a level that I thought was more honest than most people did." The point of the article being that, although Sendak's books were magical and beautiful adventures, at the crux of them he wanted to help children grow up - to confront a few realities and leave the "wild rumpus" behind, for truer things. And I like that. I love children's and young adult authors who don't `talk down' to their audience - they don't pull punches and they don't shy away from the harder, truer side to life. And that's why I didn't particularly like the ending of Horvath's book . . . it was all wrapped up a little too neatly, a too sickly-sweet, unbelievable happy ending.

So, ultimately, I thought that the neatly-wrapped ending didn't do this book justice. Sure it was cute and quirky, Primrose was magnificent and the recipes offered an interesting character insight. But I felt like this book was a bit like fairy floss - all temporary tastiness, no real substance.
Dandr
I bought this book for my 11-yr-old granddaughter and decided to read it before sending it to her. In spite of some of the other reviews which criticize the happy ending, I believe tht it is age-appropriate for the intended audience. For my granddaughter, life's cruel realities will evidence themselves in good time, but for now I would like her to have happy stories to read. Primrose sounds like a little girl that I would like to meet, and I hope her story will encourage my granddaughter to read more. I give this book 4 stars only because I have not read enough children's literature lately to form a superlative opinion for the time being.
Kirinaya
My 8 year old daughter really enjoyed this book. She wasn't thrilled with it in the first chapter but after a couple chapters she really started to love it.
Kare
Our fifth grader loved this book. She wrote a two page book report on it and loved retelling parts of the story to us. It was exciting to watch her WANT to finish a book.
Uriel
This book is a suspenseful, touching story. I loved it and recommend it to young people who may be dealing with the loss of a parent or separation from a parent.
kewdiepie
Great story line - outstanding vocabulary!!!
Bought this book for one of my grandchildren. It was required reading, but it was a book that easy and fun so the book report wasn't a chore.My great grandchildren love this book and want it read to them over and over again.