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Download M.C. Higgins, The Great (Turtleback School Library Binding Edition) ePub

by Virginia Hamilton

Download M.C. Higgins, The Great (Turtleback School  Library Binding Edition) ePub
  • ISBN 1417753080
  • ISBN13 978-1417753086
  • Language English
  • Author Virginia Hamilton
  • Publisher Turtleback Books; Turtleback School & Library ed. edition (May 1, 2006)
  • Formats txt lit txt docx
  • Category Children
  • Subcategory Growing Up and Facts of Life
  • Size ePub 1466 kb
  • Size Fb2 1127 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 107

FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY. As a slag heap, the result of strip mining, creeps closer to his house in the Ohio hills, 15-year-old M.C. is torn between trying to get his family away and fighting for the home they love. A Newbery Medal Winner & ALA Notable Children's Book.

School & Library Binding: 128 pages. Publisher: Turtleback Books (January 1, 1992)

School & Library Binding: 128 pages. Publisher: Turtleback Books (January 1, 1992). I think this book was great, it was sad that Patty Ann drowned trying to save another cousin, this is why we must love each other while we are alive, Cammy thought that Patty Ann was miss perfect, she played the piano, she was good at school, Larry liked her hair: Cammy was just about ready to invite Elodie home after day camp.

Higgins, the Great (Hardcover). Published October 1st 1987 by Turtleback Books. Hardcover, 278 pages.

Showing 1-30 of 40. . Higgins, the Great (Paperback). Published May 1st 2006 by Aladdin. Paperback, 288 pages. Higgins, the Great (Hardcover).

The Magical Adventures of Pretty Pearl. by Virginia Hamilton. Sweet Whispers, Brother Rush (Older Childrens Fiction).

School & Library Binding. Higgins the Great, because it was kind of interesting. Virginia Hamilton is a wonderful author and I will read other books that she has written. I say it's interesting, because of . being scared of the spoil heap and you know you be wanting to know whats going to happend next. Also what interest me was when . and the girl were like wrestling in the woods. I wish there was a sequal! I will continue to promote the greatest children's bok ever wrote, . Higgins The Great, happy 25! This is one of the best Newbery books I have read. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 20 years ago.

Hamilton’s classic coming-of-age tale: The National Book Award– and Newbery Award–winning novel about a young man who must choose . In front of him, the beautiful Ohio River Valley and the great world beyond.

Hamilton’s classic coming-of-age tale: The National Book Award– and Newbery Award–winning novel about a young man who must choose between supporting his tight-knit family and pursuing his own dreams Mayo Cornelius Higgins perches on top of a homemade forty-foot tower, considering two destinies. Behind him is his family’s beloved house at the foot of a mountain that strip mining has reduced to loose rubble.

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Hamilton’s classic coming-of-age tale: The National Book Award– and Newbery Award–winning novel about a young man . Mayo Cornelius Higgins perches on top of a homemade forty-foot tower, considering two destinies.

Hamilton’s classic coming-of-age tale: The National Book Award– and Newbery Award–winning novel about a young man who m. weighs whether to stay with the family and home he loves or set off into the world on his own, there appear on the horizon two strangers who will make his decision all the more difficult.

Higgins, the Great - Virginia Hamilton. This book is about a young boy named . Higgins who lives on Sarah's mountain in rural Ohio with his family

Higgins, the Great - Virginia Hamilton. But the motion of his arms caused a flutter of lettuce leaves he had bound to his wrists with rubber bands. Like bracelets of green feathers, the leaves commenced to wave. Higgins who lives on Sarah's mountain in rural Ohio with his family. The mountain is named for his great-grandmother who escaped there from slavery. Since then, it has belonged to his family, and one day it will be his.

Library Binding: 320 pages. Publisher: Turtleback Books (May 6, 2003). The book was written in Englilsh, so Pedulla has translated nothing.

Talk about M.C. Higgins, The Great (Turtleback School Library Binding Edition)


Delari
My son got this book a few days ago and is almost done with it. He says it is a great book. He is in 6th grade, I was told this was an 8th grade level but he says it is way to easy of a read but still a very good book!
Milleynti
From what I can tell, M.C. Higgins the Great has three main plots. The central one being the possibility of M.C.'s mother being discovered and marketed as the newest superstar singer. There are two other subplots as well, a strong one and a weak one.

The strong subplot makes the reader aware of an avalanche of spoil possibly falling on M.C.'s house due to poor mining practices in the area. It could actually be tied in with the central plot about the singing, but I have an easier time just separating these events into different categories. The weak subplot is your classic coming of age story, where M.C. has his first (I guess it's his first) major crush on a girl. This subplot is not really needed except to make M.C. more angry during the last chapter of the book.

Now why it takes 275 LONG pages to cover the three plots, I don't really know. There are definitely some interesting parts of the book, but these good parts are seperated by so much of what I see as trivial padding. I didn't really see a need for the scene where M.C. and his mom go swimming at all, and there are so many other smaller scenes in the book that really aren't worth mentioning.

I think the book is okay; I just wish it were much shorter.
Cheber
Interesting story. A gift to my grandson. I read it first.
Juce
Was very pleased with speed of shipment and quality of the book I ordered! Would order from this vendor again. Thanks :)
Blueshaper
Although the story is set presumably in the mid 1970’s, it has a distinctly backwoodsy1930’s feel to it. This very intense tale (covering about three days of action and mental anxiety) features two conflicting Black families who coexist in an uneasy truce of suspicion—who practice two diverse methods of family survival. More than mere poverty the Higginses and the Killburns are threatened by contamination from the runoff of coal mining—as well as the insidious creeping march downward of the Spoil—the ever-growing slag heap which could cause killer mudslides after heavy rains. Tortured by this grim threat to his generations-old homestead thirteen-year-old MC is forced to think creatively and even argue with his parents who refuse to leave their beloved land.

This serious book is not your typical YA fluff; the young protagonist feels compelled to warn his parents--then convince them to leave for their own safety. But leave—the mountains where his Grandmother Sarah fled from slavery with her baby boy? Where the very hills have voices for those who will listen? Where MC, perched atop his special metal pole, oversees the natural environs and yodels for his younger sibs? Where his mother’s voice is the pride of the countryside? Where it was engrained to avoid those witchy folks with their light skin, reddish hair and six digits on both hands and feet?
Events are put into motion with the arrival of two strangers on one day: a white dude who is collecting rural melodies on his tape recorder and a self-reliant girl with a car and her own knife on a solo vacation.
How can a mere teenager concoct a plan to protect his family from
imminent danger as a result of mining operations? Will the dude
make MC’s mother a recording star in Nashville and thus force the family to sacrifice their rustic existence for her career? Is it safe or wise for MC to stand up to Jones, his father, in physical and verbal showdowns?

This is no racist novel; rather one about family honor and respect for past generations. So how can long-dead ancestors advise the living and come to their aid in a desperate situation? In this intense story readers “hear” arguments and dialogue taking place in MC’s own mind. The mostly Black characters are portrayed fairly, realistically, and
sympathetically by the author of the outstanding Underground Railroad
Story, The House of Dies Drear. It is left to each reader to determine who MC’s true antagonists are. MC and the Outlaw girl appreciate the safety of life’s web. A grim coming-of-age story where the foggy mountains themselves are characters, but true friendship always proves a treasure
Rexfire
I hate it i suck s and makes absolutly no sence at all what so ever i never want to read ut again
Perdana
Hamilton takes us to a rough and fantastical household in Appalachia. M.C. Higgins, the Great, thirteen, is the oldest child who watches over his siblings from the top of a 40-foot pole, hunts with his hands, and rebelliously befriends a six-fingered boy whose family is considered witchy.

I couldn't tell if he loved or hated his father whom he calls Jones; they play-fight with a fierceness that made me uncomfortable. His mother tells her son, 'He's Jones. And don't you forget it.'

He has his first crush on a stranger, a girl who shows up in the woods. He hunts her like quarry, tackles, kisses, and *stabs* her lightly on the back, astounded that she gives him a shiner by throwing a flashlight at his head. Later he finds her tent by a remote lake and they establish a wary friendship.

M.C.'s mom, Banina, climbs up the mountain after long work days. When she gets to the ravine across from their house, she starts yodeling and the kids yodel back. M.C.'s hopes are invested in his mother's voice; perhaps she'll be discovered and they can leave their house, a dwelling endangered by strip-mining. Banina's singing was the most endearing part of the novel; it made me wish there was a soundtrack.

M.C.'s life is so alien—both in his circumstances and his responses—that I couldn't connect with him. Nothing made sense. The whole time I slogged through this (Newberry award!) book, I couldn't imagine any child reading this to completion.