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Download Odd and the Frost Giants ePub

by Neil Gaiman

Download Odd and the Frost Giants ePub
  • ISBN 0061671754
  • ISBN13 978-0061671753
  • Language English
  • Author Neil Gaiman
  • Publisher HarperCollins (September 22, 2009)
  • Formats azw docx mbr rtf
  • Category Children
  • Subcategory Science Fiction and Fantasy
  • Size ePub 1373 kb
  • Size Fb2 1953 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 519

Odd has had some terrible luck, but it's about to change when he rescues a bear who is more than he seems to be in this brilliantly inventive short novel inspired by traditional Norse mythology from a Newbery-winning New York Times best-selling author and an acclaimed artist.

Home Neil Gaiman Odd and the Frost Giants. He died before the next morning of the cold and the wet and the water in his lungs. When they returned to Norway, they told Odd’s mother, and Odd’s mother told Odd. Odd just shrugged. He didn’t cry. He didn’t say anything.

Home Neil Gaiman Odd and the Frost Giants. Odd and the frost giants, . 1 2 3 4 5. Dedication. Nobody knew what Odd was feeling on the inside.

The thrilling, wintry Nordic tale by Neil Gaiman, who weaves a magical story of legend and adventure that will enchant . It's going to take a very special kind of twelve-year-old boy to outwit the Frost Giants, restore peace to the city of gods, and end the long winter

The thrilling, wintry Nordic tale by Neil Gaiman, who weaves a magical story of legend and adventure that will enchant readers from beginning to end. Od. It's going to take a very special kind of twelve-year-old boy to outwit the Frost Giants, restore peace to the city of gods, and end the long winter. Someone cheerful and infuriating and clever. Someone just like Odd.

Can a twelve-year-old boy reclaim Thor's hammer, outwit the Frost Giants and release the gods?

But when Odd flees to the woods and releases a trapped bear, his luck begins to change. The eagle, bear and fox he encounters reveal they're actually Nordic gods, trapped in animal form by the evil Frost Giants who have conquered Asgard, the city of the gods.

Odd and the Frost Giants Neil Gaiman Illustrated byBrett HelquistFor Iselin and Linnea CHAPTER 1 ODD THERE WAS A BOY called Odd, and there was nothing strange or unusual about that, not in that time or place. Odd meant the tip of a blade, and it was a lucky name. At least, the other villagers thought so. But if there was one thing that he wasn’t, it was lucky. His father had been killed. THERE WAS A BOY called Odd, and there was nothing strange or unusual about that, not in that time or place.

Odd and the Frost Giants (2008) is a World Book Day book by Neil Gaiman. It draws on Norse mythology and also the historical Vikings. Odd is a young Norseman whose father, a woodcutter, drowned during a Viking raid. His Scottish mother marries a fat. His Scottish mother marries a fat widower who neglects him in favor of his own children, and when soon after the winter drags on unnaturally long, Odd leaves his village for the forest. There he meets a fox, an eagle and a bear, the latter with its paw trapped in a tree.

Neil Gaiman was born in Hampshire, UK, and now lives in the United States near Minneapolis EARLY WRITING CAREER Gaiman began his writing career in England as a journalist

Neil Gaiman was born in Hampshire, UK, and now lives in the United States near Minneapolis. As a child he discovered his love of books, reading, and stories, devouring the works of . Tolkien, James Branch Cabell, Edgar Allan Poe, Michael Moorcock, Ursula K. LeGuin, Gene Wolfe, and . EARLY WRITING CAREER Gaiman began his writing career in England as a journalist. His first book was a Duran Duran biography that took him three months to write, and his second was a biography of Douglas Adams, Don't Panic: The Official Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy Companion.

Neil Gaiman is the New York Times bestselling author of more than twenty books, including Norse Mythology, Neverwhere, and The Graveyard Book. Among his numerous literary awards are the Newbery and Carnegie medals, and the Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy, and Will Eisner awards. Originally from England, he now lives in America.

Start by marking Odd and the Frost Giants as Want to Read .

Start by marking Odd and the Frost Giants as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The book is about the titular viking boy Odd (meaning "the tip of a blade" and not "strange"), who had a terrible accident after his father died in an equally terrible accident (they are not the most lucky of people), leaving Odd with a disability.

Odd unhooked his axe from his belt and walked around the pine tree. He cut a piece of wood about six inches long and used it to prop the two trees apart; he did not want to crush the bear’s paw. Then, with clean, economical blows, he swung the blade of his axe against the birch. The paw was dripping with honey. The bear licked its paw with a startlingly pink tongue. Odd, who was hungry, picked a lump of honeycomb from the edge of the hole, and ate it, wax and all. The honey oozed down his throat and made him cough. The bear made a snuffling noise. It reached into the tree, pulled out a huge lump of comb and finished it off in a couple of bites.

Talk about Odd and the Frost Giants


Brick my own
The first word that comes to mind when I think of this story is 'charming'. It has the feel of an old world myth or fairy tale. Odd isn't a disgruntled, angry youth like so many of the characters in current YA novels. He's just a quirky kid with a quick mind who loves him mother. I know, that doesn't sound like the makings of a fun adventure story full of talking animals, mischievous gods and frost giants, but that is exactly what it is. Odd's quirkiness, intelligence and humor are exactly what make the story work.

The fact Odd has to puzzle out problems in order to achieve his goals, makes this a great story for parents to read to their young children. There's no horrible violence, none of the animals gets hurt, and it doesn't take itself to seriously. I especially enjoyed Odd's reasons for believing ice imprisons rainbows. It's cute and clever and adds to the magic of the story without the need for wizards in pointy hats.

If you enjoy Norse myths and are up for a more light-hearted take on coming of age stories, 'Odd and the Frost Giants' is worth picking up. It's a short, happy tale to read during a gray winter day.
Vishura
Why I Think Boys May Enjoy This

Well, first off I must admit that I am a huge fanboy for anything Neil Gaiman. That being said, this middle grade story falls into the category of must-read primer to Norse Mythology (in addition to, you know, Gaiman’s recently published collection of Norse stories). This one, however, is written with that middle grade audience in mind and does so wonderfully. It’s rare to get a “new” Norse Myth story but Gaimain does this with Odd. He uses the familiar framework (Loki does something to screw things up for everyone else) and creates an entirely new myth around Odd.

The story itself has an Aesop’s Fables feel to it with a familiar plot: magical animals appear to our would-be hero, who helps them even at risk to his own life. Of course, the animals turn out to be gods. In a very Viking way, however, Odd is rewarded not simply for his good heart, but for his bravery and cleverness in helping the gods take back Asgard from the Frost Giant that tricked Loki. Odd’s adventure with the gods is framed around a very nice story about a young boy losing his father and dealing with a disability, yet remaining positive and determined no matter what was placed in front of him.

It would be remiss to discuss this version of the book without giving credit to the amazing illustrations by Chris Riddell. In some cases, he was given a full two-page spread to work with and he did not disappoint. With his simple black and white drawings accented in silver (which is just gorgeous and found throughout), this is one of the prettiest books I’ve held in my hands in a while. Riddell’s art amplifies Gaiman’s story in a masterful way. Visions of the Norse gods as they are presented in actual Norse myth (not the Marvel comics version) are wonderful.

Content/Appropriateness

It’s a myth story, so normal myth stuff applies: temptation by beauty, death (but nothing cruel or gruesome), and hardships for our hero followed by rewards for his performance by the gods. There is clearly no language or content concerns across the board and the only real death is an “off-screen” death of Odd’s father by illness after nearly drowning in the frozen waters of the north.

The artwork is all G-rated and there is nothing to suggest that the youngest of readers couldn’t enjoy this story. It would make a great read out-loud story with its numerous large pictures and a strong reader as young as 8 could easily pick this up and run with it on their own. It is not watered/”dumbed” down for a young audience but is still more than accessible.

Rating

4/5 Giant Cartoon Mallets from Toonopolis, The Blog's Books for Boys Review
Ffel
If I had to guess, Mr. Gaiman was plugging along on his "Norse Mythology" book, stuck this in as a chapter, then went "hey, this could be a children's book!"
...
Ok, probably not given the timing of everything. But the similarity of the prose between the two is simply profound. I picked this up within days of finishing Norse Mythology, and it was as though I had never stopped reading.

As with all of Mr. Gamain's books, the writing in this is superb. In particular, there is something about the way he has written this and Norse Mythology that makes them feel old, in an antique, biblical sort of way. The style fits very, very well with the setting.

The setting is... not what I expected. I expected a story more in the vein of Beowulf. Instead, this was a romp through the mythology of Loki (the fox), Odin (the eagle), and Thor (the bear), kicked out of Asgard by none other than the frost giants. While a good read, it wasn't great. It was, as with most mythology, oddly alien and remote. This is a fine thing, as it is a great introduction to Norse mythology for kids.

With that said, this will be a book I expect my daughters to either read with me or ask a TON of questions (both of which are fine). There is simply too much subtle interaction going on in the background between the three gods for her to simply pick up and read away. If any kids book is a "this needs to be read twice to really get it," this is it.

I am certainly not disappointed with the purchase. Just not quite what I expected. As a comparison to Mr. Gaiman's other kids books, this is certainly not the masterpiece of adventure/horror "Coraline" nor the silly read-it-whenever adventure of "Fortunately, the Milk." A solid, if slightly niche, addition to our growing library of Mr. Gaiman's books.