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Download Dangerous Games ePub

by Joan Aiken

Download Dangerous Games ePub
  • ISBN 0440415934
  • ISBN13 978-0440415930
  • Language English
  • Author Joan Aiken
  • Publisher Yearling (July 11, 2000)
  • Pages 256
  • Formats azw lit lrf txt
  • Category Children
  • Subcategory Science Fiction and Fantasy
  • Size ePub 1612 kb
  • Size Fb2 1577 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 786

This eagerly awaited addition to Joan Aiken's award-winning Wolves series takes us on Dido's most imaginative adventure yet!Dido Twite has been sailing the high seas, chasing after Lord Herodsfoot, who is scouring the globe for new and interesting games. Now he's needed back in London, in the hope that his games will help King James, who is lying ill and wretched with a mysterious disease no doctor can cure. Dido's search has taken her to Aratu, a mysterious spice island where foreigners seldom venture--maybe because of the deadly pearl snakes and sting monkeys there.When Dido lands at Aratu, she realizes that there is something even more dangerous than poisonous snakes on the island. She soon makes friends among the Forest People and learns of a plot to overthrow the island's king, who lives--deaf and sick--at his palace on the Cliffs of Death. Will Dido and her friends be able to reach him in time?

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. This eagerly awaited addition to Joan Aiken's award-winning Wolves series takes us on Dido's most imaginative adventure yet!

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. This eagerly awaited addition to Joan Aiken's award-winning Wolves series takes us on Dido's most imaginative adventure yet! Dido Twite has been sailing the high seas.

This ebook features an illustrated personal history of Joan Aiken including rare images from the author's estate. Joan Delano Aiken was born in Rye, Sussex, England, on September 4, 1924, the daughter of the Pulitzer Prize winner, writer Conrad Aiken. She was raised in a rural area and home schooled by her mother until the age 12. She then attended Wychwood School, a boarding school in Oxford.

Электронная книга "Dangerous Games", Joan Aiken. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Dangerous Games" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. This ebook features an illustrated personal history of Joan Aiken including rare images from the author’s estate. Joan Aiken (1924–2004) was an English writer best known for her children’s literature.

This ebook features an illustrated personal history of Joan Aiken including rare images from the author’s estate. Adventures & Detectives Fantasy Kids. One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline.

This eagerly awaited addition to Joan Aiken's award-winning Wolves series takes us on Dido's most imaginative adventure yet! Dido Twite has been sailing the high seas, chasing after Lord Herodsfoot, who is scouring the globe for new and interesting games. Now he's needed back in London, in the hope that his games will help King James, who is lying ill and wretched with a mysterious disease no doctor can cure.

Dangerous Games is the 5th book in the award-winning Wolves Chronicles, but you may enjoy reading the series in. .Dangerous Games - Joan Aiken. CHAPTER 1. The old ship Siwara smelt strongly of dead shark, rancid oil, and rotten breadfruit. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Open Road MediaReleased: Dec 1, 2015ISBN: 9781504018821Format: book. carousel previous carousel next.

Joan Aiken, Dangerous Games (Delacorte, 1999)

Joan Aiken, Dangerous Games (Delacorte, 1999). I've read a number of criticisms of the book, and I really can't refute them; Dangerous Games does feel phoned in at times, with the minor characters not getting anywhere near the development they should and the pace flagging now and again.

by. Aiken, Joan, 1924-2004. Her mission to bring an expert on games back to an ailing King James III in London takes Dido Twite to a small tropical island, where she is caught up in the conflict between a conniving city dweller and the more subtle powers of the native forest people. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on September 28, 2010.

Dangerous Games (The Wolves Chronicles, by Joan Aiken

Dangerous Games (The Wolves Chronicles, by Joan Aiken. This eagerly awaited addition to Joan Aiken's award-winning Wolves series takes us on Dido's most imaginative adventure yet!Dido Twite has been sailing the high seas, chasing after Lord Herodsfoot, who is scouring the globe for new and interesting games. Nightbirds on Nantucket (The Wolves Chronicles, by Joan Aiken.

Talk about Dangerous Games


Andromakus
This book was purchased for my twelve year old grandson as part of his Summer reading assignment. He chose it because he likes adventure books. I can not give a rating.
Capella
Joan Aiken, Dangerous Games (Delacorte, 1999)

I somehow got it into my head that Dangerous Games was the fifth Dido book, instead of the eleventh (and also found out that the one I thought was #4, The Stolen Lake, is actually the seventh); now I'm all messed up. Oh, well, reading them out of order has taken nothing out of my enjoyment of them, anyway.

In this eleventh episode of the journeys of Dido Twite, she, Mr. Multiple, and recent passenger Dr. Talisman put in at Aratu, a small island in the South Seas, in order to search for Lord Herodsfoot, who has been recalled to England. Dido, who it seems is finally on her way home, is a bit put out by yet another delay, but at least, she thinks, with Herodsfoot in two she'll have no choice but to get back to dear old Britain. Of course, things are never as simple as they seem, and before long, Multiple is in the hospital with a head wound, and Talisman, who saved his life, is being hunted by the town mayor for practicing medicine without a license. Then, to make things worse, their ship is seized. And Herodsfoot is off in the jungle somewhere. What now?

I've read a number of criticisms of the book, and I really can't refute them; Dangerous Games does feel phoned in at times, with the minor characters not getting anywhere near the development they should and the pace flagging now and again. Still, though, Dido and her adventures are a good deal of fun, and this one's as enjoyable as the next. I think. If you like the series, give this one a try, but be warned-- it seems a lot of Aiken fans were less than impressed by this one. ***
Scoreboard Bleeding
I make a point of not reading the plot synopsis of a book before I read the book itself. When you pick up a novel and read the back or inside cover of it you might discover things that the author would really rather you find out within the context of the story and not via a fifty-word synopsis. So I didn't read the synopsis of "Dangerous Games" until after I read the book. Under normal circumstances, this rarely causes any problems. In this case, however, I discovered that I had unknowingly read this book out of order. You see, "Dangerous Games" is one of the books in the "Wolves Chronicles", which began with "The Wolves of Willoughby Chase". And Dido Twite, the heroine of this tale, began in those books. Not knowing this, I read this story without any idea that it was a sequel or continuing saga of some sort. And you know what? It didn't matter. "Dangerous Games" is so fast-paced, amusing, and intelligent that you needn't read any of its predecessors to appreciate it fully. Part "Treasure Island" part "Below the Root", the story is a comment on colonialism and how conquering a land does no good to either the conquerors or the conquered.

It may seem like a wild goose chase, but Dido Twite has been hunting down a ridiculously difficult prey for quite some time and thus far has had no luck. When the British King Jamie comes down with a cold (he's just a kid, you know), he insists that the only thing that will save him are some new and interesting games brought via Lord Herodsfoot. Herodsfoot studies games and his latest finds have taken him to the mysterious island of Aratu. Now Dido must find the man and bring him back to England, but not before she comes to know the lay of the land a little better. In Aratu you have native forest dwellers, called the Dilendi, and the colonizing Angrians. Once arrived, Dido finds herself caught in a war between a king and his brother, befriending a lost princess, speaking with ghosts, avoiding sting monkeys, creating rain itself, and all in all having a really grand adventure.

The book says some absolutely lovely things about the innate ridiculousness that comes when Europeans found colonies on already existing native populations. In this case, the Angrians settled on Aratu and began destroying the forest for further plantations. When the Dilendi cursed the Angrians with a deep abiding homesickness for their native lands, the population either emigrated or became peculiar. As a result, the remaining Europeans are a sorry crew. True, they control much of the island by force, but internally they've responded by oppressing their women, establishing rigid class systems, and generally disapproving of any and all fun. They're like puritans without the whimsy.

Aiken does a find job of never relegating a person to a distinct personality simply due to their skin color. I find it interesting that other reviewers of this book have accused it of racism when no one is a certain way solely because of their genetics. You've good Angrians and bad Angrians and good Dilendi and bad Dilendi. The villain of this tale is an Angrian who best represents all the failings that come with willful ignorance. The hero of this tale, Dido, is a wonderful London scamp with a Cockney accent and a penchant for pants. Her companion, Dr. Talisman starts as male and then turns out to be a wonderfully strong female character for whom you never worry one moment. As for the upper class twit Lord Herodsfoot, I found myself more than once wishing that someone would give the guy a swift kick in the butt once in a while. He's the perpetual schlemiel of the story. If there's a cliff to be accidentally fallen over or a poison to eat, you can bet who'll be the one doing the falling and eating.

Mostly, however, the book's real lure is its adventure. And I daresay that this is one of those rare adventure tales boys will read EVEN THOUGH the hero of the tale is, essentially, feminine. If your young male reader doesn't take to Dido then you may count them out as lost causes. She's such a wonderful character that it would take pounds of prejudice to keep from devouring her every word and action. I stumbled across "Dangerous Games" entirely by accident, but I'm truly glad that I did. It's a fine piece of work and a tale that, in spite of its series status, stands alone beautifully. A great great story.
Ygglune
In all seriousness, I doubt that Joan Aiken wrote "Dangerous Games." It reads as if a committee were hired to create a passable story against the backdrop of her alternative history. The publishers would have been better off finding some decent internet fanfic writers to do the job, because nothing about "Dangerous Games" is anything but an embarrassing failure to measure up to the period detail, extravagant plotting, wrenching moral dilemmas (a necessary ingredient for good childrens's literature), and dark humor that made the previous books in the series so satisfying.
Come to think of it, "Cold Shoulder Road" read as if it were written half by Aiken and half by committee. Perhaps she is simply tired of the series. If so, she should let the thing die.
Kegal
In my opinion Dangerous Games is Joan Aiken's best piece of writing. It is action packed and stuffed with adventure! Once you start reading, you can't put the book down.

Dangerous Games is about a crew of sailors in search for Lord Herodsfoot, a kind nobleman, needed back in London. Dido Twite's search brought her and the crew to the island of Aratu. After finding Lord Herodsfoot, Dido discovered a plot to over through the king of the island. Through dangerous forests and caves they must travel. Can they reach him in time? This book will send you over the edge! If you can get in to a breakneck plot and interesting characters, you will love this book!
Elastic Skunk
Joan Aiken is one of my all time favorite authors but I did not think this was one of her best. The characters are exaggerated caricatures and the plot is pretty farfetched.
Ranenast
Fans of Aiken's Wolves chronicles will not be disappointed. Dangerous Games is a dizzy, delightful adventure that yet again posits Dido Twite as the most tested and triumphant heroine in all of children's literature. While the sinister edge that colored Miss Twite's previous outings is a little muted here (and the cover art, alas, is not by Edward Gorey--a sad absense) there are more than enough thrills to make up for it. And the ending, in typical Aiken fashion, sends tingles up your spine. She's that good--one of the best writers on this planet. (I only hope Dido gets back to Battersea soon!)