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by Pat Grant

Download Blue SC ePub
  • ISBN 1603092730
  • ISBN13 978-1603092739
  • Language English
  • Author Pat Grant
  • Publisher Top Shelf Productions (September 1, 2013)
  • Pages 96
  • Formats docx lrf doc mobi
  • Category Comics and Funnies
  • Subcategory Graphic Novels
  • Size ePub 1514 kb
  • Size Fb2 1586 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 378

Blue is the debut graphic novel of Australian cartoonist Pat Grant. Part autobiography, part science fiction, Blue is the story of three spotty teenagers who skip school to go surfing, only to end up investigating rumors of a dead body in their beach town.

Blue is the debut graphic novel of Australian cartoonist Pat Grant.

Blue is the debut graphic novel of Australian cartoonist Pat Grant  . Blue is the debut graphic novel of Australian cartoonist Pat Grant. Part autobiography, part science fiction, Blue is the story of three spotty teenagers who skip school to go surfing, only to end up investigating rumors of a dead body in their beach town.

Город: AustinmerПодписчиков: 1 ты. себе: Draws comics. New graphic novel the Grot coming out soon through Top Shelf. It's a fascinating blend of autobiography and fiction with a sci-fi twist: in a seaside Australian town struggling with alien tentacle-creature immigration, a trio of aimless teenagers skip school to go surfing, chase rumors of a dead body, and avoid dealing with their own fears.

Ulysses S. Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant; April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American soldier and politician who served as the 18th president of the United States from 1869 to 1877

Ulysses S. Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant; April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American soldier and politician who served as the 18th president of the United States from 1869 to 1877. Before his presidency, Grant led the Union Army in winning the American Civil War. As president, Grant worked with the Radical Republicans in the Reconstruction of the Union while having to deal with corruption in his administration.

But that’s pretty much why Australian cartoonist Pat Grant made this graphic novel. They don’t run right out there to see the thing, though - they meander, they quibble, they curse, they cause harmless trouble, they act like kids who have broken the leash.

W : Giramondo Publishing. You must be logged in to Tag Records.

p. : ill. (chiefly co.

Pat Grant is the Australian Mark Twain, trading Huck's raft for a waxed-up .

Pat Grant is the Australian Mark Twain, trading Huck's raft for a waxed-up surfboard and an inked-up sable brush. Vast themes of racism and immigration unravel in sprawling murals and a single day in the life of some reckless teens in this sea-polished, perfect nugget of a book. Part autobiography and part science fiction, Blue is the story of three spotty teenagers who skip school to go surfing, only to end up investigating rumors of a dead body in their beach town. Habibi's Craig Thompson said this about Blue: "This book rekindles my earliest enthusiasm for the comics medium.

Pat Grant: You know, that’s a great question. I was really trying to pretend I wasn’t obsessed with genre material

Pat Grant: You know, that’s a great question. I think that for a long time I had snotty literary ambitions that I had planted in me at uni where I studied creative writing. I wanted to do work that serious people might think said something about important things. It was a big lie. I was really trying to pretend I wasn’t obsessed with genre material. Now, I’m in my 30s and I have a book that I guess is a bit literary and a bit serious. It’s kind of annoying

Talk about Blue SC


Silver Globol
Amazing book!
Kifer
One of the things that I've really enjoyed discovering in the last few years is graphic novels and comics from other countries. While I always knew they existed, it seems like they were often difficult to get ahold of or you had to read them in their native languages, which is not my strong suit. Thankfully in the last few years the internet (and certain publishers) have broadened the reach of artists and storytellers from other countries to allow us to see the variety and different types of works being created around the world. And Australian Pat Grant may just be my new favorite. I had a chance to meet him and a caravan of other Australian artists at TCAF last month and I was blown away by the different types of visual imagery and storytelling than what I'm familiar with. And Pat's work Blue was one of my favorites. The story is a unique blend of autobiographical, fiction, and sci-fi all whirled into one. Set in the summer of a few years or so ago, in a seaside Australian town struggling to deal with an invasion of alien refugees.

The story is a densely packed and thought provoking exploration into Australia's resentment at migrant culture and casual racism through the eyes of three misbegotten youth. Pat bases the work upon aspects of his own history and life, sharing with readers what life is like growing up in a different culture and how similar it is to our own, even with a vastly different language. And the exploration of racism is unique, not because Pat explores it, but because of how he goes about it. By presenting the other cultures as alien life forms (literally they have tentacles) it forces the reader to look at the issue in a different way than if it was just another human. The treatment, the things that the character say and do, their reaction to death of one of these aliens causes the reader to look deep within themselves at how they act in their own world. It's thought provoking and powerful.
I love Pat's visual style. It reminds me of cartoons from the 30's and 40's with the wavy arms and the way the characters move on the page, almost like they are rubber just bouncing up and down. And yet it is also deeply set within the visual imagery of Australia, especially the way the aliens draw and leave symbols upon the walls and pages of the book. It reminds me of some of the types of lines that I've seen in Aboriginal art, not that this is what Pat is making reference to, but it pulls me in to the story more because of it and what little I know of Australian history.

I think my favorite aspect of this book though is the essay at the back. Grant talks extensively not only about his inspiration for the book (and art in general), but something about the history of graphic and comic art in Australia. He tells us how Australia has so little in the way of history of comic art and how this lack of history creates a positive and negative impact, not only in how own work but the work of others. It's engaging and informative read and a great bonus to the book. In fact I wouldn't mind reading more essays by Pat as he has some great insights that I think could be interesting.

This is probably one of the most difficult reviews I've written. Not because I didn't enjoy the book, but because even a month later I'm still pondering everything that I read. Which is the greatest reason I can recommend it. Its a thought provoking book and I really enjoyed it. So if you're looking for something a bit different or just want to expand your tastes to something from outside the US pick up this book and give it a read. You won't be disappointed. 5 out of 5 stars.
Zorve
As of 2012 there are two 'Great Australian Graphic Novels'. The first is Shaun Tan's 'The Arrival', the heartwarming story of a migrant's journey and acceptance in a new land. The second is Pat Grant's 'Blue', a critical and thought provoking exploration into Australia's acceptance and resentment at migrant culture, territorialism and casual racism through the eyes of three adolescents in a partly fictional town named Bolton.

'Blue' is an incredibly meticulously designed, painstakingly illustrated and utterly human debut work for Grant.
Melbourne's The Age review described the work as 'authentic', taking 'full advantage of the comic's medium' and was 'masterfully composed'.
The Australian newspaper's literature section praised Grant's 'beautiful full-page illustrations are worth scouring over so as not to miss the small details' and summarised the work as 'a major achievement' that 'deserves something stronger than conventional praise, and readers as attentive as those for the most involving, demanding novels.'
The Comics Alliance called it both 'beautifully drawn' and 'uncommonly sophisticated.'

The book is part sci-fi. It's part auto-bio. It's part coming-of-age story. It creates a whole new visual language just for Australia and is not comparable to anything else out there right now.
In summary, this graphic novel is Important with a capital I, and a first press copy deserves to be on any serious graphic novel collector's bookcase.
Elizabeth
Pat Grant's BLUE (2012, Top Shelf/Giramondo) is a gem, just a terrific read with eye-candy galore. Grant's work is entirely new to me. Incredibly dense, both in its imagery and its thoughtful characterizations & dissection of casual racism (on the beaches of Australia), though it always flows with effortless grace. Highly recommended, and a book I'm revisiting often this month. The concluding essay by Grant, on autobiography, comics, and specifically surf comics (from Rick Griffin to Mark Sutherland) is a major bonus, and also well worth a close read. Kudos & don't miss this one.
Otrytrerl
Great story, interesting art, and a really nice essay at the end