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Download Kick-Ass ePub

by John Romita Jr.,Mark Millar

Download Kick-Ass ePub
  • ISBN 0785134352
  • ISBN13 978-0785134350
  • Language English
  • Author John Romita Jr.,Mark Millar
  • Publisher Marvel Publications; First Edition (1st printing) edition (February 17, 2010)
  • Pages 216
  • Formats lit txt azw mbr
  • Category Comics and Funnies
  • Subcategory Graphic Novels
  • Size ePub 1448 kb
  • Size Fb2 1851 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 811

Have you ever wanted to be a super hero? Dreamed of donning a mask and just heading outside to some kick-ass? Well, this is the book for you - the comic that starts where other super-hero books draw the line. Kick-Ass is realistic super heroes taken to the next level. Miss out and you're an idiot! Wolverine: Enemy of the State's team of Mark Millar (Civil War) and John Romita Jr. (World War Hulk) reunite for the best new book of the 21st century. This title collects Kick-Ass numbered 1-8.

What Mark Millar and John Romita Jr. have done here simply calls for a cinematic adaptation, and I am salivating

What Mark Millar and John Romita Jr. have done here simply calls for a cinematic adaptation, and I am salivating. Kick-Ass follows Dave Lizewski, an ordinary high-schooler and comic nerd that dreams of being a superhero, and then decides to actually become one. He discovers that it isn't really easy to fight crime as an untrained sixteen year old, but he perseveres.

John Romita Jr. has been an artist at Marvel Comics for 35 yrs. Over the course of those years, there's been . Over the course of those years, there's been some great runs at Marvel- Frank Miller on Daredevil, Chris Claremont on X-Men, JMS on Spider-Man to name a few and guess who was supplying the art on these titles? These days, John brings his distinctive style to Kick-Ass and Hit Girl with Mark Millar and the Avengers vs X-Men series which wraps this October. In the near future, you'll receive more JRJr art in Captain America, where he and Rick Remender take over the series this November as part of MarvelNOW!

John Salvatore Romita, professionally known as John Romita Jr. (/rəˈmiːtə/; born August 17, 1956), is an American comics artist best known for his extensive work for Marvel Comics from the 1970s to the 2010s

John Salvatore Romita, professionally known as John Romita Jr. (/rəˈmiːtə/; born August 17, 1956), is an American comics artist best known for his extensive work for Marvel Comics from the 1970s to the 2010s. He is the son of award-winning artist John Romita S. .John Romita Jr. is the son of Virginia (Bruno) and comic-book artist John Romita S. one of the signature Spider-Man artists since the 1960s.

EXCLUSIVE: Read Millar & Romita J. s Complete Kick-Ass Kick-Ass' creators have reunited to tell a story full of guns, money and plenty of blood. And now, CBR readers who may have missed out on the series' first Image Comics issue have a chance to catch up, for free

EXCLUSIVE: Read Millar & Romita J. s Complete Kick-Ass by Stephen Gerding. Kick-Ass' creators have reunited to tell a story full of guns, money and plenty of blood. And now, CBR readers who may have missed out on the series' first Image Comics issue have a chance to catch up, for free. Below, we present the first issue of theall-new Kick-Ass by Millar, Romita, Peter Steigerwald and John Workman, in its entirety.

John S. Romita, Jr. (born August 17, 1956) is an American comic book artist best known for his extensive work for Marvel Comics from the 1970s to the 2000s

John S. (born August 17, 1956) is an American comic book artist best known for his extensive work for Marvel Comics from the 1970s to the 2000s. He is often referred to as JRJR (the abbreviation of John Romita, J. John Romita, Jr. is the son of comic-book artist John Romita, S. began his career at Marvel UK, doing sketches for covers of reprints as a favor thanks to his respected father.

Jeremy Soule (Skyrim) - Tundra + "Winter Ambience"

Part 3, End of Issue) Kick Ass 3 - Issue 1 of .

Part 3, End of Issue) Kick Ass 3 - Issue 1 of 8. Kick Ass 3 issue 2 of 8 - Mark Millar, John Romita, Jr. Spider-Man 2016 - Marvel Comics.

The first series of Kick-Ass gave an answer that mixed honesty (hero Dave Lizewski got beaten up a lot) with wish-fulfilment (he helped crush a mafia ring)

The first series of Kick-Ass gave an answer that mixed honesty (hero Dave Lizewski got beaten up a lot) with wish-fulfilment (he helped crush a mafia ring). In the second series of Millar and Romita's lurid comics, collected here in hardcover and due to be spun into a movie in 2013, Lizewski's antics have encouraged more freaks and fantasists to create alter egos – Doctor Gravity is a physics professor with a wand wrapped in tin foil, while Moon-Bird helps drunk girls home. Published: 24 Jun 2013.

Kick-Ass 6 – Ebook written by Mark Millar, John Romita J.Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Kick-Ass 6. Avete mai voluto essere un supereroe? Dave Lizewski non si è limitato a sognarlo a occhi aperti. Dopo essersi fatto un costume e scelto il nome Kick-Ass, ha deciso di rendere la sua monotona vita più interessante e di provare ad aiutare qualcuno. Ma senza alcun superpotere e circondato dai criminali più violenti di New York, potrebbe aver fatto male i suoi conti.

Читайте Kick-Ass 1, Band 1 (автор: Mark Millar, John Romita J. бесплатно 30 дней . Kick-Ass 1, Band 1. Автор Mark Millar. Kick-Ass is a comic book about comic books. бесплатно 30 дней в течении пробного периода. Читайте книги и аудиокниги без ограничений в веб-браузере или на устройствах iPad, iPhone и Android. Читать другие книги автора: Mark Millar. carousel previous carousel next. For such a superficial, surface-level book, it is entertaining, well-drawn, engaging, and occasionally quite funny. It's a good read because it's a good time, in much the same way that a brainless popcorn action movie is a good time.

Talk about Kick-Ass


Lcena
My goodness, no wonder there's a movie coming out. What Mark Millar and John Romita Jr. have done here simply calls for a cinematic adaptation, and I am salivating. If you've ever wondered what it'd be like if some fool - and an untrained kinda nerdy high school fool, at that - decides to don a superhero costume and prowl the slimy streets in search of mischief, this'll be an eye-popper.

John Hughes never dreamed of something like this in his high school flicks. The central figure is comic-book-reading 16-year-old Dave Lizewski who doesn't boast that tragic a past; no radioactive insects bit him; he wasn't exposed to a magic word; and he's not an orphan from an exploded planet. To quote Dave Lizewski, his origin is he was bored. But under Mark Millar's insanity, Dave's story takes on this dark, outrageous, ultra-violent turn while still staying somewhat in the periphery of what's realistic.

This trade collects the first eight issues and lets you into an urban bloodbath. Because when you put on a wet suit and start looking for trouble, odds are you're gonna end up bumping against some seriously hard mothereffers. And when your only super powers are perseverance and some talent for soaking up punishment, you'll most likely end up hitting the floor really hard. Dave gets severely pounded his first time going up against some thugs, and then he gets bowled over asss over heel by a hurtling car.

Months of recovery from his injuries, and you'd think Dave's learned his lesson. But then Dave puts on the costume again and resumes his night patrols. And then, while bracing some muggers, Dave becomes an overnight online sensation, the first real-life superhero. The Internet even gives him his superhero code name. And soon other costumed freaks are following in his footsteps, including a badasss ten-year-old girl expertly wielding swords. Go throw your hands in the air for the lethal and potty-mouthed Hit-Girl. And, okay, with Hit-Girl, Millar does wander past what's believable. But she's such a cool character that we have to, have to give her a pass.

Despite the Rob Liefeld intro, this trade is a jaw-dropping read, but it's horribly suited for children, nuns, and perhaps Armenians. Profanity and nudity are a healthy presence. Let me say that KICK-ASS is bloody and brutal and subversive and simply in your damn f----- face, and Millar shows you why no one's actually gotten away with putting on a costume and stomping on amoral lowlifes in real life. Artist John Romita, Jr. comes in with some of his best stuff and there's even that smidgen of that Frank Miller vibe in his art. Saying that this series is violent is to understate matters, kinda like suggesting that Big Daddy exhibits questionable parenting skills. I've already said that Mark Millar is insane, and I'm sticking to that. But the guy is also a master of his craft, and so we eat up his dish of bloody visceral bombast, and I also relish how Dave and, later, Red Mist go about on their new careers (Meanwhile, Big Daddy & Hit-Girl's relationship is really too dysfunctional to be relatable). So is this an unflinching, credible look at costumed vigilantes in the real world? Probably more so than not. The dialogue, by the way, rings true, as does Dave Lizewski. And the story is funny as well. I laughed my titmice off at what happens when Dave arrives at the moment in which he feels he ought to start leaping rooftop to rooftop. Dave Lizewski is a compelling character, but I think the kid is seriously disturbed. Still doesn't keep me from saying that his alter ego absolutely friggin' rules!
Yozshugore
Kick-Ass follows Dave Lizewski, an ordinary high-schooler and comic nerd that dreams of being a superhero, and then decides to actually become one. He discovers that it isn't really easy to fight crime as an untrained sixteen year old, but he perseveres.

I watched (and loved) the Kick-Ass movie a while back, so I knew almost exactly what I was getting into with this book. The movie captures the feel of the book very well, even though the events in the book are somewhat different. The movie treats the characters more idealistically than the book. The book reminded me of Watchmen a bit, except that the scale is not so epic, and the mood is much less melancholy and much more optimistic.

I always feel a bit nervous about reviewing graphic novels, because I treat them just like any other book, and I'm not sure if I'm supposed to. I know that graphic novels have their own conventions etc., but I don't think I've read enough of them to be aware of them yet. I really enjoyed the way Kick-Ass was structured, but I'm not sure if that's just a function of the medium.

Anyway, I did really enjoy the book - it's hilarious, the characters are fun, and even though Dave is extremely foolhardy; I can't help but admire his perseverance. And of course, Hit-Girl is my favourite character, simply because she is such a badass (I sincerely hope that she never exists in real life, though.)

I should warn potential readers that there is a lot of violence and profanity from children etc, but overall, Kick-Ass is a very well done black comedy. I can't wait to read Kick-Ass 2.
Skilkancar
Mark Millar and John Romita, Jr. have done in comics what Jack Ketchum (Offspring) or Jeff Lindsay (the Dexter novels) did in novels: go the extra step by graphically depicting brutality rather than glossing over it. Combined with a clever premise and novel characters, the result is impressive, disturbing, and most definitely not-for-kids, much as they probably would like it.

Readers who first have seen the movie will get a few surprises. Much of the dialogue in the movie is lifted directly from the Kick-Ass comics without modification. Many of the scenes are shot to look nearly identical to various illustrated frames. Yet, there are distinct and interesting differences, no doubt because, as Dave Lizewski (aka Kick-Ass) says in issue #1, "What works on the page doesn't always work on the screen." The backstory of the character Big Daddy takes an unexpected turn, for example, though I'll leave it for the reader to discover or other reviewers to reveal. Dave's relationship with Katie Deauxma is far less pleasant in print than in film, and more credible.

For all its darkness, the book is funny. "How does a ten-year-old girl get her hands on a flame-thrower?" Dave asks. Hit-Girl answers casually, "eBay." This graphic novel is not for everyone, and definitely is not for the squeamish. If you're the type of reader who is likely to show up at a Comic Con convention, however, it probably is for you.
DART-SKRIMER
Definitely not a comic for the kids. If you liked kick-ass (the movie or the comic) then you will love Hit-Girl. This comic has a great pace, great art by John Romita Jr. and as always a great story by Mark Millar.

As you might have guessed, it follows Hit-Girl (aka Mindy McCready) in the events shortly after the first Kick-ass novel. Without giving any spoilers, it is the story of Mindy trying to live a normal life for her mother's sake. Seeing her struggle to fit in at school just like any other kid her age is great and adds to the dimensionality of this character.

Don't worry though - there is still plenty of Hit-Girl kicking ass.