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Download Planetary VOL 01: All Over the World and Other Stories ePub

by Warren Ellis

Download Planetary VOL 01: All Over the World and Other Stories ePub
  • ISBN 1563896486
  • ISBN13 978-1563896484
  • Language English
  • Author Warren Ellis
  • Publisher WildStorm Productions; Volume 1 One edition (2000)
  • Pages 160
  • Formats lrf lit rtf doc
  • Category Comics and Funnies
  • Subcategory Graphic Novels
  • Size ePub 1248 kb
  • Size Fb2 1871 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 862

"Provocative , eminently addictive, and top of its class."— ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLYThe creator of the acclaimed series TRANSMETROPOLITAN, Warren Ellis delivers PLANETARY, hailed as a timeless story that turned modern superhero conventions on their heads.This graphic novel features the adventures of Elijah Snow, a hundred-year-old man, Jakita Wagner, an extremely powerful woman, and The Drummer, a man with the ability to communicate with machines. Tasked with tracking down evidence of super-human activity, these mystery archaeologists uncover unknown paranormal secrets and histories, such as a World War II supercomputer that can access other universes, a ghostly spirit of vengeance, and a lost island of dying monsters.

Layers of mystery wrap Planetary: All over the World like rice candy.

Ships from and sold by Will's basement. Ships from and sold by Will's basement. Layers of mystery wrap Planetary: All over the World like rice candy. Follow the enigmatic heroes Jakita Wagner, Elijah Snow, and the Drummer as they excavate the secret history of the world from its wealth of bizarre happenings.

Layers of mystery wrap Planetary: All over the World like rice candy. Book 2 retains the passivity, but the stories go to another level, and the action begins to build. Warren Ellis is the award-winning writer of Transmetropolitan, Planetary, The Authority, and the writer and co-creator of the graphic novel RED, which was the basis of two major motion pictures. He is also the author of the NYT-bestselling novels Gun Machine and Crooked Little Vein.

Электронная книга "Planetary: All Over the World and Other Stories", Warren Ellis

Электронная книга "Planetary: All Over the World and Other Stories", Warren Ellis. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Planetary: All Over the World and Other Stories" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Planetary, Vol. 1 book. Issue 1 - All Over the World : Jakita Wagner recruits the misanthropic loner Elijah Snow to join a mysterious team called Planetary. Details on their operations and make-up are scarce. They have scads of cash, but all the field team seems to know is that they are funded, and ultimately directed, by a shadowy figure known only as the Fourth Man.

All Over the World and Other Stories (collects hc, 160 pages, 2001 . Keeping the World Strange: A Planetary Guide  . Warren Ellis at the Internet Book List. Works by or about Warren Ellis in libraries (WorldCat catalog). The Complete Warren Ellis bibliography. Keeping the World Strange: A Planetary Guide Thurman, Kevin and Julian Darius. Voyage in Noise: Warren Ellis and the Demise of Western Civilization Nevett, Chad (e. Warren Ellis on Marvel. Warren Ellis at 2000 AD online.

Tasked with tracking down evidence of super-human activity, these mystery archaeologists uncover unknown paranormal secrets and histories, such as a World War I. .

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLYThe creator of the acclaimed series TRANSMETROPOLITAN, Warren Ellis delivers PLANETARY, hailed as a timeless story that turned modern superhero conventions on.

Planetary VOL 01: All Over the World and Other Stories. What makes All Over the World so cool? Warren Ellis is at the top of his game here, with dazzling ideas, deft characterization, and great dialogue all working together. Book in the Planetary Series). by John Cassaday and Warren Ellis. Planetary is the story of the secret history of the twentieth century - or at least, the twentieth century as reflected in our fiction.

Tags: Graphic Novel (2), Warren Ellis (2), Planetary (1), Comics (1), One-shots (1), Superheroes (1), Connects To Everything (1) . Minhas Graphic Novels (1231 books items).

Minhas Graphic Novels (1231 books items).

Planetary is an American comic book series created by writer Warren Ellis and artist John Cassaday, published by WildStorm Productions, an imprint of DC Comics. Planetary also refers to the group portrayed in the series

Planetary is an American comic book series created by writer Warren Ellis and artist John Cassaday, published by WildStorm Productions, an imprint of DC Comics. Planetary also refers to the group portrayed in the series. It was originally intended to be a 24-issue bi-monthly series.

Talk about Planetary VOL 01: All Over the World and Other Stories


Goktilar
When I started reading Warren Ellis's Transmetropolitan series, I thought I had a potential new favorite comic. (if it could beat out Sandman). Ellis's writing style was cynically hilarious and his world and main character fascinating. Now, after starting Planetary, I know I was wrong. Barring a horrendous ending, this is going to be my favorite comic of all time.

Planetary begins with an introduction by great Alan Moore, who sums up the appeal of this series better than I ever could. Planetary is not a comic about super heroes. Instead, it follows a trio of archeologists uncovering the secrets of the 20th cenutry. What are these secrets, you ask? Basically, every fictional genre of the last 100 years. The first issue starts out as your standard 'Justice League' type examination, and from, Ellis takes on Japan monster movies, Hong Kong crime dramas, and so much more. What's more, Ellis exudes the concept of cinematic. His dialogue is witty and engaging, but he always knows when to pull back and let John Cassaday's phenomenal artwork. Seriously, just read issue three, your jaw will drop.

One other notable thing about this series is that each issue is very self-contained. In an age when stories take months to tell, Ellis wanted each issue to be meaningful.

Buy this as fast as you can.
Weernis
Warren Ellis and John Cassaday's "Planetary" does not seem a decade-and-a-half old. Ellis is at the top game here, including references to the history of comics, allusions to modernist literature, critiques of history, and subtle digs at the history of comic books while jumping both locations and genre-conceits. It's meta-fictive without breaking the fourth wall entirely. Ellis walks into the grounds of Morrison but does so without the flash and heavy-handed intrusion that Morrison often relies on. Indeed, in many ways, Ellis seems to be playing into the sandbox of archetypes that Morrison, Gaiman, and Moore almost made cliche, but Ellis's take is more grounded and feels more fresh. Ellis is also more consistent in world-building than any of the other comic authors mentioned by Alan Moore.

Ellis's characters are archetypes and sometimes feel a bit empty, but the deepen throughout the comic. Ellis, however, does not let his archetypes remain static archetypes nor does he completely hallow-out his dialogue. This is greatly aided by John Cassady's character design, consistent art, and use of blending genre-styles in the art to match the meta-fictive elements. Ellis is also interesting in that this is not purely a "concept comic" nor a super-hero comic, but somehow straddles that line in ways even the "high concept super-hero" writers don't.
Urreur
Picked this up volume after perusing information about it on the Internets that got my spider-sense tingling. Good ol' spider-sense.

What do we have here? Pulp heroes. The Justice League of America (or a reasonable facsimile thereof). Giant Japanese monsters. The Fantastic Four (or a reasonable facsimile thereof). The Secret History Of The Twentieth Century. What's not to love? (Assuming you're not one of WildStorm's lawyers; they were probably kept rather busy with this one.)

Yes, this sort of thing has been done before (Phil Farmer's Wold Newton tales being the most obvious antecedent). Yes, it could be hopelessly cornball and banal (and could certainly turn out to be - I've only just read Vol. 1, y'know). But it really seems that Messrs. Ellis and Cassaday are doing their own thing with this one, and I certainly plan on tuning in for future installments.

PS Did I mention the artwork's really great? No? Oh. The artwork's really great. Thought you might want to know.
Ffleg
Warren Ellis has the talent like Alan Moore of creating vivid, interesting characters in a medium supersaturated with tired superhero ideas. What's fascinating is that yes, you can consider their characters parodies or critiques, but they are so believable in their own right. Compared to the millions of X-men whose characters get more generic or forced and powers more esoteric, Ellis comes along and pops out characters that just nail it. I believe in these characters.

Jakita is stunning and appropriately edgy without being obnoxious. Drums could be the weakest, but his psychic connection to electronics just works, and Elijah Snow is fascinating. At first he seems to be just grumpy for the sake of being a grumpy character, to give him lines, but it blossoms into a perfect characterization. What's refreshing about Elijah, is that he is a superhero who doesn't have all the answers. He doesn't instantly respond to a crisis with heroics as is the rule. This is a man figuring out the world, realizing there is much he doesn't know, and slowly building towards action. That alone would keep me reading.

The stories overflow with creativity, incorporating aspects of comics and popular culture in an alternate view of the past that has been kept hidden from the world at large. Ellis isn't quite as deft with this as Moore is in League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, but neither is he quite as heavy-handed or borderline pretentious (and I do love Moore's work). Reading the description for the book, it sounds like the perfect idea, brilliantly inventive and intriguing. In actual practice though, I was somewhat let down. The primary flaw is that the stories are so passive.

Many people give Planetary the nod over the Authority, but at first I was blown away by the excitement of the Authority. There is a similar feel to the two books, but the Authority are active superheroes. Here, Planetary are more like children being told stories. As such it was more reading a story than experiencing it. It was quite apparent to me and provided my chief dissatisfaction with this book.

That being said, this is a series that builds. Reading Vol. 2, I was definitely on board and loving it. Book 2 retains the passivity, but the stories go to another level, and the action begins to build. There are some truly brilliant stories in Vol. 2 that definitely provoke an emotional response. Maybe they aren't knocking on the Watchmen's door, but they've arrived on the same street.

So though I think this book 1 is a bit slow and passive, this is a worthy starting point for a fascinating series, and as such I recommend it. Definitely more creative and intriguing than 90% of the superhero books out there.