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Download Ôoku: The Inner Chambers, Vol. 5 ePub

by Fumi Yoshinaga

Download Ôoku: The Inner Chambers, Vol. 5 ePub
  • ISBN 1421536692
  • ISBN13 978-1421536699
  • Language English
  • Author Fumi Yoshinaga
  • Publisher VIZ Media LLC (December 21, 2010)
  • Pages 224
  • Formats doc lit azw txt
  • Category Comics and Funnies
  • Subcategory Manga
  • Size ePub 1993 kb
  • Size Fb2 1502 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 940

In this 17th Century Japan the Shogun is a woman...and the harem is full of men.Reads R to L (Japanese Style), for M audiences. Gyokuei, who first arrived at the Inner Chambers as a young novitiate monk, has risen to become one of the Shogun Tsunayoshi’s advisors. He hopes to protect the shogunate the same way his mentor Arikoto once did. But the numerous intrigue of the Inner Chambers—and the shogun herself—are pushing Gyokuei’s patience and cunning to the breaking point.

The fifth volume of Ōoku: The Inner Chambers really starts getting at the heart of ‘why monarchy is maybe not such a good idea even if you have some good monarchs’. Fumi Yoshinaga continues her excellent re-imagining of Japanese history, though I did find that the first chapter or two got a bit too bogged down in byzantine court politics.

oku: The Inner Chambers (大奥, Ōoku) is an ongoing Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Fumi Yoshinaga

oku: The Inner Chambers (大奥, Ōoku) is an ongoing Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Fumi Yoshinaga. The plot follows an alternate history of early modern Japan in which an unknown disease kills most of the male population, leading to a matriarchal society in which the Ōoku becomes a harem of men serving the now female shōgun. The manga has been serialized in Hakusensha's josei magazine Melody since 2005

fumi yoshinaga's writing is subtle and takes a while to pick up, but in the mean time, the scenes she creates are both . Viz Media's second volume of Fumi Yoshinaga's alternate-Edo saga "Ooku: the Inner Chambers" is (how is this possible?) even better than the first!

fumi yoshinaga's writing is subtle and takes a while to pick up, but in the mean time, the scenes she creates are both charming and heartbreaking. The way that the shogun is written makes you both loathe and pity him and the historical notes in the back are interest and educational. Viz Media's second volume of Fumi Yoshinaga's alternate-Edo saga "Ooku: the Inner Chambers" is (how is this possible?) even better than the first! Ruler of a gynocratic Japan in the deadly wake of the male-killing Red Pox, the shogun Yoshimune summons ancient scribe Murase, to read his secret chronicles of a ravaged society's gender-bending struggle to survive.

Book 1 of 11 in the Ōoku: The Inner Chambers, 大奥 Series. Usually this convention is just part of the experience for these books, but I found the convention jarring and disruptive of the aesthetic experience. This was the more unfortunate the characters were never that interesting. Yunoshin is quickly established as our hero.

Gyokuei, who first arrived at the Inner Chambers as a young novitiate monk, has risen to become one of the shogun Tsunay. Books related to Ôoku: The Inner Chambers, Vol. 5. Skip this list. Bouvard and Pécuchet.

oku: The Inner Chambers, Vol. 11. (Book in the Ōoku: The Inner Chambers, 大奥 Series). In Edo period Japan, a strange new disease called the Redface Pox has begun to prey on the country's men. Within eighty years of the first outbreak, the male population has fallen by seventy-five percent. Women have taken on all the roles traditionally granted to men, even that of the shogun. The men, precious providers of life, are carefully protected.

Fumi Yoshinaga is a Tokyo-born manga creator who debuted in 1994 with Tsuki to Sandaru (The Moon and the Sandals)

Fumi Yoshinaga is a Tokyo-born manga creator who debuted in 1994 with Tsuki to Sandaru (The Moon and the Sandals). Yoshinaga has won numerous awards, including the 2009 Osamu Tezuka Cultural Prize for Ooku, the 2002 Kodansha Manga Award for her series Antique Bakery, the 2006 Japan Media Arts Festival Excellence Award for Ooku. She was also nominated for the 2008 Eisner Award for Best Writer/Artist. Country of Publication.

Gyokuei, who first arrived at the Inner Chambers as a young novitiate monk, has risen to become one of the shogun Tsunayoshi's . But the numerous intrigues of the Inner Chambers-and the shogun herself-are pushing Gyo.

Gyokuei, who first arrived at the Inner Chambers as a young novitiate monk, has risen to become one of the shogun Tsunayoshi's advisors. Tell us if something is incorrect.

Электронная книга "Ôoku: The Inner Chambers", Fumi Yoshinaga. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Ôoku: The Inner Chambers" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Gyokuei, who first arrived at the Inner Chambers as a young novitiate monk, has risen to become one of the Shogun Tsunayoshi’s advisors. He hopes to protect the shogunate the same way his mentor Arikoto once did. But the numerous intrigue of the Inner Chambers-and the shogun herself-are pushing Gyokuei’s patience and cunning to the breaking point. About The Illustrator. Publisher: VIZ Media LLC (December 21, 2010). ISBN13: 9781421536699.

Talk about Ôoku: The Inner Chambers, Vol. 5


Jeyn
Ooku vol. 5, much like the previous volumes isn't just a story of the Shogun and the men behind the Ooku wall but about an entire society and how it changes. This alternate history shows both the good and the bad, the real human desires that make people act as they do from pride, lust, to vanity, boredom and obsession.

Ooku volume 5 keeps to the high standards of the rest of the series, which if you don't have, I recommend buying now. Only instead of the story of tragic lovers, as in an earlier volume, or a hard women, keeping the empire together (another volume) here is an examination of how a shogun like so many world leaders, can change over time. Pressured on one side not to adopt but create her own heir, past the point of reason, and swayed not by her own mental illness but the sudden madness of one close to her, our female Shogun makes laws and atmosphere in the Ooku which is soon reflected in the rest of Japan.

We follow the female Shojun and the male High Court official, who both start as those who care about the empire, while one may care a bit more about personal gain. But as time continues, and one of the two forgets the Japanese people and empire, and is bored, and so the things that boredom leads to leaves the other to try and pick up the slack.

Ooku is unique in that is it telling a history, both the good leaders and the poor ones, but all interesting, and all had their own reasons for acting. But we finish this volume hoping that history can be turned around, not so much that men take over but that the Shogun, or the Emperor cares about the people again, and that corruption and slack become part of the past, not the present ruler.

Any thought that this is a dry read, is only because I don't want to reveal plot points and back conspiracies. This is a great work, one which I read as soon as it comes out and I have no regrets in doing so, I only wish Viz added even more titles to the Signiture Line as their selection seems to be spot on.
Duktilar
As Fumi Yoshinaga’s alternate history gets closer to the modern era, and the opening of Japan to the rest of the world, events move faster and more dramatically. Even with the delay between volumes — beautifully detailed historical interactions take time to draw — I had no problem catching up here. The thorough cast of characters pages help, but so does the universality of the main story. It’s all about how the new shogun wants to implement a universal vaccination program, now that they know that the red face pox, the disease that killed so many boys and men and left the country to be governed by women, can be beaten.

The challenges are manifest:
* an ineffective leader whose actions are controlled by his murderous mother
* public confusion over the risks and rewards of inoculation
* how to succeed without raising the ire of powerful leaders
* a distracting concubine who appears to have lost her mind after her child died
* how to benefit from the knowledge of other languages and cultures
* the conflict between hereditary positions and staffing those who actually have the knowledge needed for accomplishments

It all ties together in complex, satisfying ways. For something set so very long ago, in another culture, it’s very relevant to see the importance of the vaccine and the torment felt by those who lose children to such a terrifying disease. The fear of a country trying to hide its weakness from the international community by demanding tight borders also struck a chord. I don’t know much about Japanese history, but even I know, with the giant ship on the last page, that’s about to change. (Review originally posted at ComicsWorthReading.com.)
Forcestalker
I am continually impressed at how Yoshinaga has managed to create such an incredible story but through the manga form. History that is painstakingly researched - from medicine to astronomy, social to political, rich and poor alike - yet also crafted into an impressive and engaging story underneath. Her ability to create rich triumphs and devastating defeats within this winding timeline is unparalleled.

Story: Ienari is under the iron dominance of his mother yet he plans a small rebellion of his own. He enlists the aid of doctor ryojun in secret to renew the work to end the red face pox. But Ienari's mother has plans of her own and it doesn't involve a son who develops a political agenda outside of hers. Double crosses, twists, and surprises abound as a new attempt is made to end the pox that has killed so many of the male population. And then strange black ships appear on the horizon....

This feels so real - as if it could actually have taken place. The strengths and weaknesses of the characters as well as the politcal and social machinations are spot on. It's always a real nailbiter to see who will succeed and who will fail - with failure often meaning death.

I also greatly appreciate that this is a generations story. Where the forebearers are strong, often the progeny end up very weak and ineffectual - so very much like real life. This story always hits such a note of accuracy in its nuances; life is never black and white and no one is good or evil. Typically, just selfish or not.

I have greatly enjoyed Ooku and look forward to where it will go now that the Americans and Commodore Perry have arrived on Japanese shores. It's so amazing how the story and the actual history are combined into something so fascinating. Reviewed from an advance reader copy provided by the publisher.
post_name
My favorite out of the entire series by far. Probably because this "emperor" seems to have the best back story.
Dishadel
I absolutely love this series, the characters are well developed and there is so much intrigue and murder and I like how this book took a huge step forward in the search for the cure of the redface pox and it feels like an ending but leaves the door right open for a new chapter. What I really hate is how much time I have to wait for the next book. I do have a tiny complain is that in this book I can see some awfully drawn side characters, it is distracting and I hope it won't happen in the next volume
Hrguig
One of my favorite manga and mangaka.