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Download A Goose in Toulouse: and Other Culinary Adventures in France ePub

by Mort Rosenblum

Download A Goose in Toulouse: and Other Culinary Adventures in France ePub
  • ISBN 0865476454
  • ISBN13 978-0865476455
  • Language English
  • Author Mort Rosenblum
  • Publisher North Point Press; 1st edition (June 26, 2002)
  • Pages 304
  • Formats azw doc mbr docx
  • Category Cooking
  • Subcategory Regional and International
  • Size ePub 1538 kb
  • Size Fb2 1353 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 417

An epicure's delight by the author of olivesIn France," said Montesquieu, "one dines. Everywhere else, one eats." A Goose in Toulouse is Mort Rosenblum's delightful foray into the French culinary experience, and into the soul of France itself. Good food, good sense, saveur, and savoir faire are the reasons this nation of sixty million inhabitants still lights the way for gastronomes around the globe. France's culinary expertise has long been an integral part of the country's national identity, and the rise of French grandeur owes more to kings' and emperors' chefs than to their generals. But if the rise of French civilization can be measured by the knife and fork, so can its fall. In a globalized world of fast food and genetically engineered crops, what does the future hold for France?Mort Rosenblum's quest to unravel the complicated politics and economics of food leads him to snail farmers and oyster rustlers, to truffle hunters, starred chefs, and legendary vintners, to those who mourn the passing of the old days and those who have successfully adapted. The result is "marvelously insightful . . . truly a French banquet" (Paul Theroux).

Mort Rosenblum is special correspondent for The Associated Press.

Mort Rosenblum is special correspondent for The Associated Press. His acclaimed books include the James Beard Award-winning Olives. He lives in Paris and Provence. He's also a witty writer and a perceptive observer, which makes him a superb interpreter of present-day France to almost any reader, whether he thinks all things French are heaven-sent or all Frenchmen are bullying snobs who ought to go to hell.

Mort Rosenblum is an American reporter who moved to France in the 1970s; he lives in Paris and in the Var, a mountain valley in th. .

book by Mort Rosenblum. Wending his way through the French countryside, Rosenblum takes readers on a tour of France.

A Goose in Toulouse book. Everywhere else, one eats. A Goose in Toulouse is Mort Rosenblum's delightful foray into the French culinary experience, and into the soul of France itself. Good food, good sense, saveur, and savoir faire are the reasons this nation of sixty million inhabitants still lights the way for g. An epicure's delight by the author of olives. In France," said Montesquieu, "one dines.

and Other Culinary Adventures in France. Mort Rosenblum has brought the intrepid rigor of his 30 years as a war correspondent to bear on France's battle to remain the worlds source of fine food. The result is a rollicking roll through the heart, myth, soul and belly of the land of Bon Appetit, a century after Escoffier.

Rosenblum joined the Associated Press at Newark in 1965. His international career began in 1967, when the Associated Press sent him to cover mercenary wars in Congo. Since then Rosenblum has run Associated Press bureaus in Kinshasa, Lagos, Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta, Singapore, Buenos Aires, and Paris.

Wending his way through the French countryside, Rosenblum takes readers on a tour of France.

Alert if: New Price below. He visits a snail rancher, oyster rustlers, and the fabled Chateau Petrus. Bruno the Truffle King rhapsodizes to him about fragrant black fungus. Looking at the way the French live through how they cook, eat, and market their cuisine, Rosenblum offers a picture of a country at war with the clichs that both define and degrade its national character.

A Goose in Toulouse: And Other Culinary Adventures in France. Coauthors & Alternates. ISBN 9780783893617 (978-0-7838-9361-7) Hardcover, G K Hall & Co, 2001. Find signed collectible books: 'A Goose in Toulouse: And Other Culinary Adventures in France'.

In France, you are what you eat, and no one knows this better than Mort Rosenblum. Here, this internationally acclaimed journalist and James Beard Award-winning food writer for his last book, Olives, applies his superb nose for news and fine fare to the food-drenched culture of a country that takes its cuisine as seriously as its politics.

When only 17, Rosenblum left the University of Arizona in Tucson to work at the Mexico City Times and then wrote for the Caracas Daily Journal

When only 17, Rosenblum left the University of Arizona in Tucson to work at the Mexico City Times and then wrote for the Caracas Daily Journal. He joined the Associated Press at Newark in 1965. His international career began in 1967, when the AP sent him to cover mercenary wars in Congo. Since then Rosenblum has run AP bureaus in Kinshasa, Lagos, Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta, Singapore, Buenos Aires, and Paris

A Goose in Toulouse: And Other Culinary Adventures in France, Hyperion (New York, NY), 2000. Rosenblum has been based in France since the mid-1970s, and some of his books reflect his life there in more whimsical terms.

A Goose in Toulouse: And Other Culinary Adventures in France, Hyperion (New York, NY), 2000. Chocolate: A Bittersweet Saga of Dark and Light, North Point Press (New York, NY), 2005. Rebuild: Kosovo Six Years After, D. O (Millbrook, NY), 2006. Olives: The Life and Lore of a Noble Fruit, a culinary history, stemmed from his purchase of a French property that contained an old but still productive olive grove.

Talk about A Goose in Toulouse: and Other Culinary Adventures in France


Kazigrel
Great read for people who want in depth knowledge of the French culinary culture. Mort's writing is entertaining and is very knowledgeable on the entire subject.
Even people who think they know everything about France will learn something from this book.
Ironfire
I am in love with French cooking. And not just French cooking but the French attitude about food. I think sitting down at the table and having a meal should be treated as a reward. It was interesting to read how the act of having a meal is changing in France. It looks like France is succumbing to fast food but not without a fight. I recommed this book if like me, you are captivated by French cuisine and want to learn about its evolution.
MrCat
Love food, love reading about food, but ths is a hard read. I am half way thru and I have had this book for 3 or 4 years. Would love to finish it but the mood has to be right. I have had better times in France than this book absorbs. Oh well.
Yggfyn
This is an insightful look at the roots and state of French food but more importantly a Frenchman's view of the spreading EU cancer and how it is eliminating long held traditions and ways of life.
Trash Obsession
This book is written by a mainstream journalist like R. W. Appel of the New York Times or Calvin Trillin of the New Yorker. As such, Mort Rosenblum looks at things culinary much more from the economic, social, and even political point of view rather than as an epicurean such as James Villas or Ruth Reichl. For that reason, the general reader will find much to interest them herein. These are not essays for only the foodies among us.
My strongest impression on reading this book is that the author is describing many of the situations which drive people, at least citizens of France and the European Union, to organize protests at world economic summits or other meetings or organizations aimed at promoting globalization. Economic conditions in France and regulations imposed by the European Union appear to be leading to the disappearance of small scale agriculture in France, the kind of agriculture which is largely responsible for the artisnal foods and wines for which France is so famous. The great irony here to my mind is that in the same last 15 years, there has been a great revival of interest in both local and international artisanal products among Americans. Whitness the great reputation and influence of Chez Panisse and the movement to support local farmers and markets plus nationally available artisanal products such as Maytag blue cheese and specialty bacons.
Another irony is that the European Union regulatory bodies are having much the same effect on smaller agricultural businesses in Europe as American regulatory agencies have on local products. They appear to be driving out of business the very agriculture which so clearly distinguishes European agricultural products from the American. The issue of cheeses from unpasturized milk is a perfect example. American customs prevents the import of any such products into the U.S. except for Rocquefort (since the French have convinced the FDA that the penicillin in this cheese kills off anything normally eliminated by Pasteurization). The problem is, the economics of producing Rocquefort is becoming so difficult that there is some danger that true Rocquefort may disappear, i.e., be too expensive to produce.
The great tragedy I sense in the disappearance of artisanal products from small scale agriculture is that it means that the relatively inexpensive pleasures one can gain from the great foods of the world are in danger of either disappearing or becoming too expensive for the average middle class foodie to afford. I would really mourn seeing things like Rocquefort or Brie go the way of caviar, simply too expensive and too rare to enjoy outside of a very expensive venue.
I strongly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys contemporary essays in general and essays on things culinary in particular. To those reviewers who found the work too dispassionate, I would point out that Rosenblum is writing journalism and not polemics. Being informed of the `desertification' of the French countryside and the reasons for same was more than enough. I will look for agendas (and recipes) in other works.
Vobei
I was ecstatic about receiving this book for Christmas, as it was heavily touted on the local NPR station and on this site. My enthusiasm was not rewarded.
Mort Rosenblum has been to lots of parts of France and, on the way, taken good notes. He also is convinced that his experiences point to the decline of 'the better days' in French cuisine, etc. and that you will care. What he doesn't do, however, is help you care by telling you what brings that decline about, how to regain this Eden, if it's inevitable, what the moral to his tale is, etc.. In short, the cause is a nice platform for him to try out his tedious and bombastic style while he tells you what it's like in France a la Rosenblum.
Cuisine is, of course, not dead in France, though the country continues to change in the face of an evolving Europe and modernity encroaches, as ever it has. Rosenblum tells you that, but without taking the next logical step: urging you to go see it. If you can't go to France to experience directly all that entails for the lover of food (which you should, with an open mind and gastronomical vigor), pick up a humble and compelling tale like M.F.K. Fischer's _Long Ago in France_. If you do, you'll spare yourself the patronizing ramblings of Rosenblum that often strain for creativity and languish until they pass into the bizarre, as in this analogy, "Still, if Roquefort is marbling its way into the United States, the way those blue pockets spread in wheels of cheese, there is still some way to go."
The only way you can like this book is if you don't have an affinity for food writing or France to be offended or if your generous nature overwhelms your critical mind. Mr. Rosenblum needs you to say, "ain't that man clever." If you can't, you'll not gain from his book.