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Download The Not So Wild, Wild West: Property Rights on the Frontier (Stanford Economics Finance) ePub

by Peter J. Hill,Terry L. Anderson

Download The Not So Wild, Wild West: Property Rights on the Frontier (Stanford Economics  Finance) ePub
  • ISBN 0804748543
  • ISBN13 978-0804748544
  • Language English
  • Author Peter J. Hill,Terry L. Anderson
  • Publisher Stanford Economics and Finance; 1 edition (May 4, 2004)
  • Pages 280
  • Formats lit rtf docx azw
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Business and Finance
  • Size ePub 1891 kb
  • Size Fb2 1383 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 319

Mention of the American West usually evokes images of rough and tumble cowboys, ranchers, and outlaws. In contrast, The Not So Wild, Wild West casts America's frontier history in a new framework that emphasizes the creation of institutions, both formal and informal, that facilitated cooperation rather than conflict. Rather than describing the frontier as a place where heroes met villains, this book argues that everyday people helped carve out legal institutions that tamed the West. The authors emphasize that ownership of resources evolves as those resources become more valuable or as establishing property rights becomes less costly. Rules evolving at the local level will be more effective because local people have a greater stake in the outcome. This theory is brought to life in the colorful history of Indians, fur trappers, buffalo hunters, cattle drovers, homesteaders, and miners. The book concludes with a chapter that takes lessons from the American frontier and applies them to our modern "frontiers"―the environment, developing countries, and space exploration.

This book by Terry Anderson and P. J. Hill is a study of. the emergence of rules and property rights in the parts of. .1 Anderson and Hill write, The lesson we should learn. from the ‘not so wild, wild West’ is that secure and transferable property

This book by Terry Anderson and P. the emergence of rules and property rights in the parts of the American. from the ‘not so wild, wild West’ is that secure and transferable property. rights may not be easy to develop, but they are a necessity for supplanting. conicts with cooperation (p. 212). The emergence of property rights.

Terry L. Anderson is Executive Director of PERC, the Center for Free Market Environmentalism; Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University; and Professor Emeritus at Montana State University. He has published 28 books. P. Hill is Professor of Economics at Wheaton College, Illinois, and a PERC Senior Associate. This is his eleventh book. Hollywood will never be able to top this portrayal of the history of the West in the . The history that Anderson and Hill depict is the current situation of the majority of entrepreneurs in developing and former Soviet countries.

This article expands Harold Demsetz's seminal work on property rights by arguing that property rights entrepreneurs discover previously unowned or unpriced attributes of a resource and capture rents by defining and enforcing rights to those attributes. To keep the rents from these new uses from being dissipated in the tragedy of the commons, the entrepreneur must contract to exclude others from. the value of his perception. We describe specific and general contracting and use the frontier of the American West to illustrate the two.

by Peter J. Hill and Terry L. Anderson . Anderson and Hill recognize from the start that many people use systems of property rights to benefit themselves at the expense of others. This "rent-seeking" often involves messing with the market, and harms society as a whole. Their love of the great outdoors and of their native state of Montana shows through and through in this beautiful tome.

Anderson, Terry Lee, 1946-. Varying Form of Title: Property rights on the frontier. Publication, Distribution, et. Stanford, Calif. Stanford Economics and Finance, (c)2004. Heros, villains, and real cowboys The institutions that tamed the West Property rights in Indian country Might takes rights in Indian country Soft gold : traders, trappers, and hunters There's property rights in them thar hills Wagon train governments Cowboys and contracts Home on the range Making the desert bloom New frontiers. Geographic Name: West (. Economic conditions.

Target/Movies, Music & Books/Books/All Book Genres/Business & Law Books‎. product description page. The Not So Wild, Wild West - (Stanford Economics & Finance) by Terry L Anderson & Peter J Hill.

His book, with Peter J. Hill, The Not So Wild, Wild West: Property Rights on the Frontier (Stanford . Hill, The Not So Wild, Wild West: Property Rights on the Frontier (Stanford University Press), was awarded the 2005 Sir Antony Fisher International Memorial Award.

The Not So Wild, Wild West: Property Rights on the Frontier. Anderson, Terry . and Peter J. Hill: Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press, 256 p. Publication Date: April 2004. Roger L. Nichols University of Arizona, USA. Page 14 Published online: 23 Jul 2012.

Manufacturer: Stanford Economics and Finance Release date: 4 May 2004 ISBN-10 : 0804748543 ISBN-13: 9780804748544.

Talk about The Not So Wild, Wild West: Property Rights on the Frontier (Stanford Economics Finance)


Beydar
The basis of this book has foundations in true individualistic commerce: Love your neighbor AS yourself, not FOR (I win, you lose) nor INSTEAD OF (I lose, you win) yourself. When our government became larger in the mid 1800s, as did our military, you find that resources were more likely determined when "raiding replaced trading after the Civil War," including dealing with Indian lands. Rather than negotiate like businessmen, force was needed to take from the Indians. This grassroots commerce, transactions at the local level, is where all laws are written and any top/down function of Federal or State driven answers or solutions actually hinder good use of resources by the locals. Excellent book to understand how the west was really won.
Juce
Explains how the Wild West managed to have way more law and order than Americans tend to think. It covers how interference by Washington, which was clueless about conditions in the West, ended logical rules that were working. Arizonans, and their environment, are still paying the price for water rights legislated by a wet Washington over the arid West. For all those with an open mind who want to know what would happen if Washington left the states alone to govern themselves.
Kabei
A fascinating book that debunks many claims and myths commonly propagated via the government agency controlled educational system.
Uste
What a great lesson on the history of the West. I highly recommend it.

I especially enjoyed learning about the Indian Wars.
Ubranzac
I don't have a lot of time to really give this review its due. However, I highly recommend this book to anyone trying to deepen their understanding of how property rights have affecteed and continue to affect our society. Hill is as gifted of a teacher as he is an economist and he and TA complement each other immensely.
Snowskin
The book reads quickly, almost like a novel. Anderson and Hill debunk the claims that the Old West was governed by anarchy and violence with numerous examples of how institutional arrangements provided ordered and security. It provides interesting insights on property rights development from de facto rights to de jure rights. I would recommend for those interested in economic history and the Old West.
Shem
All was ok, quick and i thing that every thing was ok. Everyone could buy something and it will be ok.
P.J. Hill and Terry Anderson, two very respected American economists, have written a very thoughtful book about the spontaneous emergence of law and order in the "Wild, Wild West" of yesteryear. Their love of the great outdoors and of their native state of Montana shows through and through in this beautiful tome. They delve into a variety of fascinating topics in their book, such as the gold rush, the fur trade, the wagon trail, and the Indian wars. In addition, they provide a wonderful overview of the theory of property rights, and their book contains many helpful maps, well-organized charts, and some beautiful pictures. Anyone who is interested not only in the history of the American West but also in economics generally and property rights specifically should take the time to read this book. I heartily recommend their book to anyone with an interest in these topics.