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Download Working Knowledge: The New Vocationalism and Higher Education ePub

by Colin Symes

Download Working Knowledge: The New Vocationalism and Higher Education ePub
  • ISBN 0335205712
  • ISBN13 978-0335205714
  • Language English
  • Author Colin Symes
  • Publisher Open University Pres; 1 edition (December 15, 2000)
  • Pages 192
  • Formats mobi lit lrf azw
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Education
  • Size ePub 1446 kb
  • Size Fb2 1442 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 115

Australian educators, most from the University of Technology in Sydney, grapple with some of the issues that are rising as universities across the world become ever more closely integrated into the wider society. A common theme running through the 11 studies is work-based learning whether work-oriented elements within curricula or curricular elements that are situated in workplaces where some of the larger issues are particularly clear, such as will there be new forms of knowledge and whether practical wisdom and creative making should be granted the status of formal knowledge. The anthology is co- published by The Society of Research into Higher Education. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

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Colin Symes Working Knowledge: The New Vocationalism and Higher Education. ISBN 13: 9780335205714. Working Knowledge: The New Vocationalism and Higher Education.

Work-based learning is a radical approach to the notion of higher education It has been written alongside Working Knowledge: The New Vocationalism and Higher Education (Symes and Mclntyre 2000).

Work-based learning is a radical approach to the notion of higher education. Students undertake study for a degree or diploma primarily in their workplace and their learning opportunities are not contrived for study purposes but arise from normal work. The role of the university is to equip and qualify people already in employment to develop lifelong learning skills, not through engagement with existing disciplines, bodies of knowledge or courses defined by the university, but through a curriculum unique for each person. It has been written alongside Working Knowledge: The New Vocationalism and Higher Education (Symes and Mclntyre 2000).

Working Knowledge: The New Vocationalism and Higher Education.

A common theme running through the 11 studies is work-based learning whether work-oriented elements within curricula or curricular elements that are situated in workplaces where some of the larger issues are particularly clear, such as will there be new forms of knowledge and whether practical wisdom and creative making should be granted the status of formal knowledge. Annotation c. Book News, In. Portland, OR (booknews.

AGORA XXV Higher Education and Vocational Education and Training. In: Symes, . McIntyre, J. (Eds). The new vocationalism and higher education. Date: 22 - 23 February 2007 Venue: Cedefop, Thessaloniki, Greece. SRHE & Open University Press, Buckingham, UK, 2000. In: Cedefop Panorama series Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 2005. Series No 109, 126 pages.

1 Usher, Robin, Imposing Structure, Enabling Play: New Knowledge Production and the Real World University in Working Knowledge: The New Vocationalism and Higher Education, 99 (Colin Symes and John McIntyre ed. 2000)

1 Usher, Robin, Imposing Structure, Enabling Play: New Knowledge Production and the Real World University in Working Knowledge: The New Vocationalism and Higher Education, 99 (Colin Symes and John McIntyre ed. 2000). The greater prestige of vocational courses is by no means new. Dunbabin states that this was also the case as far back as the 13th Century. See Jean Dunbabin, Universities c. 1150 - c. 1350 in The Idea of a University, 34 (David Smith and Anne Karin Langslow ed. 1999).

Vocationalism in higher education: The triumph of the education gospel. Knowledge that works: Judgement and the university curriculum

Vocationalism in higher education: The triumph of the education gospel. The Journal of Higher Education, 76(1), 1–25. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Recognition of informal learning: Challenges and issues. Journal of Vocational Education and Training, 50(4), 521–535. Knowledge that works: Judgement and the university curriculum. In C. Symes & J. McIntyre (Ed., Working knowledge: The new vocationalism and higher education (pp. 47–65). Buckingham: Open University Press. Hager, . & Gonczi, A. (1996).

Redirected from New Vocationalism). Vocational education is education that prepares people to work as a technician or in various jobs such as a tradesman or an artisan. Vocational education is sometimes referred to as career and technical education. A vocational school is a type of educational institution specifically designed to provide vocational education.

Working Knowledge: the new vocationalism and higher education COLIN SYMES & JOHN McINTYRE (Eds), 2000 .

Working Knowledge: the new vocationalism and higher education COLIN SYMES & JOHN McINTYRE (Eds), 2000 Buckingham: SRHE/Open University Press 181 p. ISBN 1 2, £6. 0 (hb) Context The vocationalisation of education and training at all levels has been the leitmotif of developments from school to university over the last two decades or s. New Vocationalism and the Knowledge Society Given Barnett’s work in this field it is appropriate that he should supply the foreword to this Australian collection of papers charting the impact of the ‘new vocationalism’ on the life and work of universities at the start of the new millennium.