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Download Nation, Governance, and Modernity in China: Canton, 1900-1927 (Studies of the East Asian Institute, Columbia University) ePub

by Michael T.W. Tsin

Download Nation, Governance, and Modernity in China: Canton, 1900-1927 (Studies of the East Asian Institute, Columbia University) ePub
  • ISBN 0804733619
  • ISBN13 978-0804733618
  • Language English
  • Author Michael T.W. Tsin
  • Publisher Stanford University Press; 1 edition (January 1, 2000)
  • Pages 288
  • Formats doc mbr docx lrf
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Humanities
  • Size ePub 1850 kb
  • Size Fb2 1634 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 949

This is the first detailed study in English of the city of Canton (Guangzhou), the cradle of the Chinese revolution, in the first quarter of the twentieth century. In retracing various fragments of the city’s history in this period, the book argues that modernist politics as practiced by the Nationalists and Communists represented a specific political rationality embedded in the context of a novel conception of the social realm. Modern governments invariably base their claim to legitimacy on the support of “society” or “the people.” The mobilization of hitherto disenfranchised constituents into the political process is thus a central component of the nation-state. Modern governments also produce schemes for categorizing and organizing these same constituents to ensure social unity and their base of support. The author analyzes this apparent paradox of modern governance―emancipation and discipline―as shown in the discourse and practice of Canton elites and the lives of the city’s inhabitants. Canton, which witnessed the modernization of both its physical and social structures in the early twentieth century, was the site of the first modernist government in Chinese history. The new governing elites, the Nationalists and Communists, attempted to dissect and classify their constituents into different classes or segments and to transform them into disciplined members of a new body social. Contrary to their expectations, extensive organizational work, though empowering the newly mobilized, did not lead to the formation of a well-ordered society. Instead, it brought into sharp focus the heterogeneity of Canton society and highlighted the impossibility of its analysis and management as a totality. To the dismay of the modernizers, social discipline could be restored only through violence.

This is the first detailed study in English of the city of Canton (Guangzhou), the cradle of the Chinese revolution, in the . About the author (2002). Michael T. W. Tsin is Associate Professor of Chinese History at Columbia University. Bibliographic information.

This is the first detailed study in English of the city of Canton (Guangzhou), the cradle of the Chinese revolution, in the first quarter of the twentieth century. In retracing various fragments of the city s history in this period, the book argues that modernist politics as practiced by the Nationalists and Communists represented a specific political rationality embedded in the context of a novel conception of the social realm. Modern governments invariably base their claim to legitimacy on the support of society or the people.

Nation, Governance, and Modernity: Canton, 1900-1927 (Stanford University Press, 1999). Contesting Citizenship in Urban China: Peasant Migrants, the State and the Logic of the Market (University of California Press, 1999). II: The Great Leap Forward, 1958-1960 (Columbia University Press, 1983). Education Under Mao: Class and Competition in Canton Schools (Columbia University Press, 1982). Class Conflict in Chinese Socialism (Columbia University Press, 1981).

Studies of the East Asian Institute, Columbia University. Nation, Governance, and Modernity in China. 9780804733618: Hardback Release Date: 1st January 2000. 9780804748209: Paperback Release Date: 9th December 2002. One of the book's great strengths is Tsin's success in bringing social-historical and theoretical analyses together, using one to illuminate the other. Journal of Interdisciplinary History. In retracing various fragments of the city's history in this period, the book argues that modernist politics as practiced by the Nationalists and Communists represented a specific political rationality embedded in the context of a novel conception of the social realm.

The unusual feature about late imperial China was neither the nature of the behavior defined as proper for a socially admirable individual nor the bestowal of medals through a state system. It was rather the use of the political system to confer explicit honors for behavior defined as virtuous in private everyday life. Awards also were given for behavior that was normative. The Chinese system also was unusual in its support for certain kinds of passive disobedience and protest.

The Journal of Asian Studies. Recommend this journal. The Journal of Asian Studies.

and modernity in China by Michael Tsang-Woon Tsin, Michael Tsin, Michael . Canton, 1900-1927.

Nation, governance, and modernity in China by Michael Tsang-Woon Tsin, Michael Tsin, Michael . Are you sure you want to remove Nation, governance, and modernity in China from your list? Nation, governance, and modernity in China. by Michael Tsang-Woon Tsin, Michael Tsin, Michael . Published 1999 by Stanford University Press in Stanford, Calif. 276 p. : Number of pages.

In this study of the 1930s, Brian Tsui reshapes our understanding of the radicalization of Chinese politics and . Brian Tsui's outstanding new book is a welcome piece of scholarship that takes scholars back to the legacy of 1927.

In this study of the 1930s, Brian Tsui reshapes our understanding of the radicalization of Chinese politics and culture. If the conservative revolution failed in its own incoherent terms, it nonetheless left permanent marks. Understanding China's mid-twentieth century revolution in these terms gives Tsui's book a startling freshness.

Nation, Governance, and Modernity: Canton, 1900–1927, by Michael . Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999. Assembled in Japan: Electrical Goods and the Making of the Japanese Consumer, by Simon Partner. University of California Press, 1999

Nation, Governance, and Modernity: Canton, 1900–1927, by Michael . University of California Press, 1999. Civilization and Monsters: Spirits of Modernity in Meiji Japan, by Gerald Figal. Duke University Press, 1999. The Logic of Japanese Politics: Leaders, Institutions, and the Limits of Change, by Gerald L. Curtis. New York: Columbia University Press, 1999. Contesting Citizenship in Urban China: Peasant Migrants, the State and Logic of the Market,.

MA School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, 1983 . Nation, Governance, and Modernity in China: Canton, 1900–1927.

MA School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, 1983 PhD Princeton University, 1991. The project is part of his ongoing interest in the historical processes through which ideas and practices were translated into established norms and values, disseminated through the social body, transplanted across different times and places, and contested and challenged by the populace.

Talk about Nation, Governance, and Modernity in China: Canton, 1900-1927 (Studies of the East Asian Institute, Columbia University)


Wal
This book is a history of the first attempt at modernity by a government in China. This is not to say there was no economic or social progress before the Republican Revolution, he's using the term "modernist" specifically to mean a government imbued with a particular worldview, reflected in discourse and practice, that is derived largely from intellectual trends during and after the 18th century European Enlightenment. The major elements are the cult of progress, belief in man as an active agent in contructing the world, and a belief that a scientific outlook can solve problems and create a rational order.

The key element in achieving modernity, according to this vision, and thus a goal of all the 20th century modernists--whether neo-Monarchists, republicans, the Nationalist or Communist Parties--is the construction of a unified cohesive social body. They thought that only after achieving this could society be reshaped in the necessary rational way. Interestingly, the author points out that neither Chinese nor Japanese language had a word for "society", in the post-European Enlightenment sense, and one had to be assigned this meaning (shehui), and it quickly took root in intellectual circles.

So how did the early parliamentary republicans, Sun Yat-Sen, and Chiang Kai-Shek (who brought the largely failed republican experiment to an end in 1927) attempt to go about achieving this cohesive unity and order in society? This forms the bulk of this book.

Why Canton? The author explains "The choice of Canton as a case study...is in part dictated by the fact that it was the site of [the first modernist] government. It is also my belief that only through the detailed and textured history of a locality can one have a sense of the life of the people, and the effects of the larger forces which shaped their milieu. This book is hence an exploration of how the lives of the inhabitants of a city intersected with the efforts of a group of modernist elites to reorder the realm."

So this book not only develops a thesis about modernity, but is also an important and detailed social history of Canton in the early 20th century (including the late Qing period).

Two areas that get special attention are the lives of workers and the attempts by the Guomindang (Nationalist Party) and the Communist Party (then working under the umbrella of the Guomindang), to mobilize labor, seen as an important step in reshaping society. But as the author shows, workers were a heterogeneous group, and didn't always follow the path desired by state and intellectual elites. This is perhaps not terribly different from how workers reacted to a different form of elite mobilization during the Cultural Revolution; see Elizabeth Perry "Proletarian Power: Shanghai During the Cultural Revolution". This leads the author to a larger point, that modernity usually cannot be imposed according to elite visions alone, but is "negotiated, contested, or even subverted by the newly mobilized constituents, as the history of Canton clearly demonstrates".

This book could be placed with other books to form a rich view of Canton's changes over time.

'Heaven is High and the Emperor Far Away: Merchants and Mandarins in Old Canton' by Valery M. Garrett

'Canton under communism; programs and politics in a provincial capital, 1949-1968' by Ezra F. Vogel

+ one of the many books written about the reform era boom of the Pearl River Delta and Guangzhou

As the author notes, given the often conflicting interests between Guangdong province and Beijing today, "a closer look at the social history of a key southern urban center sheds some light on the tensions inherent in the process of national reconstruction."
Flamekiller
Michael Tsin's "Nation, Governance, and Modernity in China: Canton 1900-1927" is unlike any other book of urban, modern Chinese history that I have ever read. It gets past the whole Shanghai-Beijing-Taiwan ghetto that Chinese urban history seems to be stuck in. It avoids the sensationalism and flogging of suffering that modern Chinese history sometimes invites.

What you get is more than a great local history, more than solid political history -- it's actually a work of intellectual history and theory. It's an amazingly penetrating, almost clairvoyant look into the the intellectual concepts that motivated different factions of Guangzhou society, such as merchants, intellectuals, and political elite, in the struggle to fill the power vacuum of post-Qing China.

Tsin reveals that the very idea of "society" as we know it was unknown in turn of the century China. The modern concept of "society" was manipulated by the elite, in an attempt to create and mobilize a political base in the lower classes. The reliance upon an idea that had little relevance to real-world circumstances lead to apathy, not support, from the public, and influenced the course of Chinese history. Tsin weaves this thread through his clairvoyant and nicely detailed analyses of elite groups, merchants, and laborers.

This book paints a picture of the precarious nature of Republican China, not only in the political sense, but in the social and psychological sense. I would have liked to see Tsin's detailed, enjoyably labyrinthine perspective applied to more aspects of post-Qing, Republican China than politics, but otherwise it was quite worth the time. I live in China now and it really made me see Chinese politics in a new light.
Nargas
I had to read this for a class and review it and all I can say is it is super boring. Not saying I don't like history and there are many other scholarly books that are interesting but the way this book is written it is so dry and confusing that it made it all the harder to read the book and complete the assignment. The book could of been tl;dr'ed: "Chinese people are unorganized so Sun Yat-sen then Chiang Kai-shek and the KMT tried to do just that with crack-downs and the Communists used this as an example of the oppressive nature of the KMT (kind of ironic really)."

This would be good for someone who is studying this particular period of time, but if they are they are probably boring people.

It truly says something when you try to sell the book back to Amazon and they won't even accept it. Because nobody wants it!
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