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Download Projected Fears: Horror Films and American Culture ePub

by Kendall R. Phillips

Download Projected Fears: Horror Films and American Culture ePub
  • ISBN 0275983536
  • ISBN13 978-0275983536
  • Language English
  • Author Kendall R. Phillips
  • Publisher Praeger; First Edition edition (April 30, 2005)
  • Pages 240
  • Formats azw lrf rtf mobi
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Humanities
  • Size ePub 1775 kb
  • Size Fb2 1649 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 895

Movie audiences seem drawn, almost compelled, toward tales of the horrific and the repulsive. Partly because horror continues to evolve radically―every time the genre is deemed dead, it seems to come up with another twist―it has been one of the most often-dissected genres. Here, author Kendall Phillips selects ten of the most popular and influential horror films―including Dracula, Night of the Living Dead, Halloween, The Silence of the Lambs, and Scream, each of which has become a film landmark and spawned countless imitators, and all having implications that transcend their cinematic influence and achievement. By tracing the production history, contemporary audience response, and lasting cultural influence of each picture, Phillips offers a unique new approach to thinking about the popular attraction to horror films, and the ways in which they reflect both cultural and individual fears. Though stylistically and thematically very different, all of these movies have scared millions of eager moviegoers. This book tries to figure out why.


Phillips analyzes ten landmark horror films, including Dracula, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, The Silence of. .Kendall Phillips explores the cultural resonances and rhetorical form of American horror films of the 20th century.

Phillips analyzes ten landmark horror films, including Dracula, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, The Silence of the Lambs and The Sixth Sense, to discover the ways horror films reflect their cultural contexts and the audiences' fears. In addition to his analyses, Phillips provides a synopsis of each film and describes its production history, contemporary audience response and cultural influence. Although Phillips incorporates the work of other film and cultural critics, he writes for a general audience.

Phillips, Kendall R. Publication date. Horror films - United States - History and criticism, Culture in motion pictures. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Oliver Wendell Holmes Library. Uploaded by station13. cebu on October 15, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

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Home Browse Books Book details, Projected Fears: Horror Films and American. Projected Fears: Horror Films and American Culture. By Kendall R. Phillips. Kendall Phillips selects ten of the most popular and influential horror films-including Dracula, Night of the Living Dead, Halloween, The Silence of the Lambs, and Scream-each of which has become a film landmark and spawned countless imitators, and all having implications that transcend their cinematic influence and achievement.

Here, author Kendall Phillips selects ten of the most popular and influential horror films-including "Dracula," "Night of the Living . Библиографические данные.

Here, author Kendall Phillips selects ten of the most popular and influential horror films-including "Dracula," "Night of the Living Dead," "Halloween," "The Silence of the Lambs," and "Scream," each of which has become a film landmark and spawned countless imitators, and all having implications that transcend their cinematic influence and achievement. Praeger Publishers, 2005.

His book publications include Controversial Cinema: The Films That Outraged America, Projected Fears: Horror Films and American Culture, and Framing Public Memory.

Movie audiences seem drawn, almost compelled, toward tales of the horrific and the repulsive. Partly because horror continues to evolve radically-every time the genre is deemed dead, it seems to come up with another twist-it has been one of the most often-dissected genres

This course will also provide an analysis of the horror film genre. one or more films and write an 8-­page essay that analyzes the significance of the set of films to the film industry, the horror genre, the historical period and/or popular culture.

This course will also provide an analysis of the horror film genre. We will attempt to identify. Your essay must have a. thesis with supporting evidence from the films and readings to support your claim.

Talk about Projected Fears: Horror Films and American Culture


Kelerana
I've used parts of this book for a course on sex, gender, race and horror films. It's not specifically about those areas, but provides useful analysis and contextualization for the films discussed. It's a great book for someone who's new to thinking politically/sociologically about horror films, and great for a course that is getting students to think about films in different ways. The analysis is not overly complex or jargon-heavy, nor does it require extensive knowledge of other film theory.

The subsections of the chapters (which varies depending on the film) are clear and helpful: Politics/Nationalism; Economic Conditions; Cultural Knowledge; Sexual Norms; Family Home; Violation, and more.

I recommend this book for horror fans, folks new to thinking about film in socio-cultural and historical ways, and students/teachers who want to augment a course.
Mightdragon
I assigned this book for my Rhetoric of American Horror Films class and the students loved it. It's engaging and intelligent without relying too much on jargon or assuming a lot of film/rhetorical theory knowledge, so it's great for the casual or serious horror film enthusiast as well. The introduction is one of the best explanations of the importance of studying popular culture that I've read and each chapter carefully explores the selected horror films as there production and reception related to the cultural contexts that resonated with audiences and filmmakers and the time of each film's release. Moreover, the book artfully traces the history of horror film by linking each chapter/film/time period to those that came before it.

A must-read for anyone interested in the significance of popular culture/horror films to our individual and national identities.
Malodora
I bought this book to augment my research for a film course I took. This book affords a concise, in-depth examination of the horror film genre and aims to identify its relevance in a historical context, psychological context, and social context. Horror films were long denied by critics as a substantial and intellectual genre worthy of scholarly research, but Kendall R. Phillips proves that they couldn't be more wrong. The films discussed in the text follow a chronological sequence, dating back to the 1920s with The Phantom of the Opera, and goes all the way up to the 90s with Scream.

Excellent book for anyone interested in horror films, film history, or with an appreciation for the much broader history of American culture.
Mr.jeka
Bought this for school but ended up keeping it after the semester because it's super interesting. A must read for any die-hard horror fans
IWantYou
Cool book. It got here quick.
Zargelynd
It's a pretty good book
Gugrel
The book wasn't awful, but the class that I had to buy it for WAS awful. Just a bad association I guess, but an interesting book for sure.
A fascinating study of how and why certain horror films connect with their historical moment. Phillips looks at the themes, content, and images that have resonated with audiences in different time periods, focusing on Dracula, The Thing From Another World, Psycho, Night of the Living Dead, The Exorcist, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Halloween, Silence of the Lambs, Scream, and The Sixth Sense. All of these films violated our expectations and norms when they appeared, Phillips argues, and his book shows us how by locating these stories within their larger cultural context.