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Download Clarissa: Or, The History of a Young Lady ePub

by Samuel Richardson,Toni Bowers,John Richetti

Download Clarissa: Or, The History of a Young Lady ePub
  • ISBN 1551114755
  • ISBN13 978-1551114750
  • Language English
  • Author Samuel Richardson,Toni Bowers,John Richetti
  • Publisher Broadview Press; Abridged edition (November 5, 2010)
  • Pages 808
  • Formats lrf lrf mbr docx
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Humanities
  • Size ePub 1381 kb
  • Size Fb2 1146 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 202

This classic novel tells the story, in letters, of the beautiful and virtuous Clarissa Harlowe’s pursuit by the brilliant, unscrupulous rake Robert Lovelace. The epistolary structure allows Richardson to create layered and fully realized characters, as well as an intriguing uncertainty about the reliability of the various “narrators.” Clarissa emerges as a heroine at once rational and passionate, self-sacrificing and defiant, and her story has gripped readers since the novel’s first publication in 1747–48.

This new abridgment is designed to retain the novel’s rich characterizations and relationships, and reproduces individual letters in their entirety whenever possible. This Broadview Edition provides a uniquely accessible entry point for readers, while retaining much of the powerful reading experience of the complete novel.


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Home Samuel Richardson Clarissa, Or, the History of a Young Lady. Clarissa, Or, the History of a Young Lady, . You are supporting writers and allowing Penguin to continue to publish books for every reader. Registered trademark-marca registrada. ISBN 978-0-698-14901-4. If you purchased this book without a cover you should be aware that this book is stolen property.

Ha, ha. I will never return this book. maybe because it was the longest novel written in English. Readers appreciated Clarissa when it was first published. Samuel Johnson, for instance, called it "the first book in the world for the knowledge it displays of the human heart.

The epistolary structure allows Richardson to create layered and fully realized characters, as well as an intriguing uncertainty about the reliability of the various . John Richetti, Toni Bowers. Broadview Press, 2010.

The epistolary structure allows Richardson to create layered and fully realized characters, as well as an intriguing uncertainty about the reliability of the various narrators. Clarissa emerges as a heroine at once rational and passionate, self-sacrificing and defiant, and her story has gripped readers since the novel’s first publication in 1747–48. This new abridgment is designed to retain the novel’s rich characterizations and relationships, and reproduces individual letters in their entirety whenever possible.

Richardson has plenty of time to develop characters, but Clarissa still manages to be too good to be true and Lovelace a spoilt, emotionally stunted thug. In reality there is enough material for a brief novella.

Clarissa, or, the History of a Young Lady is an epistolary novel by English writer Samuel Richardson, published in 1748. It tells the tragic story of a young woman, Clarissa Harlowe, whose quest for virtue is continually thwarted by her family

Clarissa, or, the History of a Young Lady is an epistolary novel by English writer Samuel Richardson, published in 1748. It tells the tragic story of a young woman, Clarissa Harlowe, whose quest for virtue is continually thwarted by her family. The Harlowes are a recently wealthy family whose preoccupation with increasing their standing in society leads to obsessive control of their daughter, Clarissa, who ultimately dies as a result.

Samuel richardson series: Clarissa Harlowe; or the history of a youn. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Other author's books: Clarissa Harlowe; or the history of a young lady - Volume 2. Clarissa, Or, the History of a Young Lady. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

History of a young lady. By Samuel Richardson. Nine Volumes Volume I. Comprehending The most Important Concerns of Private Life. Between two young ladies of virtue and honor, bearing an inviolable friendship for each other, and writing not merely for amusement, but upon the most interesting subjects; in which every private family, more or less, may find itself concerned; and, Between two gentlemen of free lives; one of them glorying in his talents for stratagem and invention, and communicating to the other, in confidence, all the secret purposes of an intriguing head and resolute heart.

Samuel Richardson’s second novel, Clarissa, or The History of a Young Lady, was published in 7 volumes . It should be noted that Richardson was enough of an artist (or moralist) to withstand the importunate petitions of his friends that this story should be given a happy ending.

Samuel Richardson’s second novel, Clarissa, or The History of a Young Lady, was published in 7 volumes, 1747-1748, eight years after the appearance of Pamela. This was the noble and tragic story of Clarissa. Its fame spread all over the continent, and it is interesting to note that the Abbe Prevost had to make in his translation certain omissions to suit the delicacy of French taste.

Clarissa Harlowe, the tragic heroine of Clarissa, is a beautiful and virtuous young lady whose family has become very wealthy only in recent years and is now eager. Clarissa, or the History of a Young Lady. By: Samuel Richardson (1689-1761). Clarissa Harlowe, the tragic heroine of Clarissa, is a beautiful and virtuous young lady whose family has become very wealthy only in recent years and is now eager to become part of the aristocracy by acquiring estates and titles through advantageous pairings.

But I think you must not ask me how I like the old gentlewoman. Yet she seems courteous and obliging. Her kinswomen just appeared to welcome me at my alighting. They seemed to be genteel young women.

Talk about Clarissa: Or, The History of a Young Lady


Thomeena
Okay, the book came in tip-top shape, and the story is a masterpiece, totally five stars. By the way, if you've read it, I must congratulate you...it's one of the longest novels ever written in the world.

Anyway, Clarissa's character at first was lovely. I enjoyed her, but after awhile, I started to hate her. I really did. Granted, I know she went through that ordeal and all, but then hundreds and hundreds of pages following that ordeal, I got soooo sick of her self-pity and, "I'm a poor creature" this, and "I'm a poor creature," that, and, "I'm the most abandoned person in the world, poor creature me, me, me," and I very literally wished she would just shut the hell up and die already. She was as much of a narcissist, in my opinion, as Lovelace. I mean, she just kept wallowing, with her stupid uplifted hands and eyes, her kerchief perpetually to her face, whimpering about herself and lousy life when there were so many opportunities for a happy ending. She was always talking about her fame and what a great person she was, and how could such a famous, pious creature as herself be brought so low? She literally committed suicide by starvation, and just LOVED talking about how ill she was and the way she was dying. I mean, she really loved talking about her pending death, and made such a huge display of it among her new acquaintances. And excepting her immediate family, she she had so many friends around her willing to help: Anna, Mr. Belford, Mr. Hickman, Mrs. Norton, Mrs. Smith, etc., yet, she kept lamenting how alone she was, that she was friendless and abandoned. It's like, she enjoyed this negativity. Instead of becoming a strong, powerful character after her experience, she became a self-pitying, egomaniac. Ugh. I do love this story because it really got a reaction out of me! If a story can do that, then the author did something right.
Mr_NiCkNaMe
Since I wrote the following review a few years ago, the Penguin version (first edition) has become available as a Kindle book. It seems like a good well-proofread edition of the excellent Penguin print version I speak about below. The first commenter on my review speaks about the Folio edition, a classy reprint which is practically identical with the Penguin first edition, more costly but well worth it if you like good illustrations and excellent bindings.

What follows is my original review from years ago. In it, I refer to the Mobi edition no longer available on Kindle, but the Mobi edition is very close to a perfect reproduction of the Gutenberg version, which is still out there and still available on Kindle. As far as I can see, the Penguin Kindle is as of February 2017 the only fully proofread unabridged first- or third-edition CLARISSA available.

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This is a great book. You have to be in the mood for it, but so many reviewers here have been in that mood it doesn't seem necessary to stress how engrossing and satisfying it can be.

Be aware: the Penguin paperback, a slight challenge to hold (because it's one big volume) is the first edition of CLARISSA. The Mobi-Kindle version available here for download is the latest, I believe the third edition.

The Penguin editor suggests the first edition is better (it's certainly shorter, though very long indeed). Here's why:

After the book was published and had its great success, Richardson noticed that some people didn't realize what a villain Lovelace was, and in particular how much he controlled the heroine from the very beginning of his seduction till the end. Also some people didn't get the moral of the book in a way that satisfied Richardson.

So he went around adding commentary and cross-references, along the lines of "Lovelace knew that already! Check out his letter from a week ago!" and so on. He also added summaries of every single letter and moral comments on many of them.

"In for a penny; in for a pound" is the old British saying, and these extra comments may be just what readers want and need. But they weren't there when the book had its first success, and the Penguin paperback leaves them out. It's a first, this Penguin edition, reproducing the first printed form instead of the later rewrites and additions. I agree with the Penguin editor that the book moves more efficiently with the later comments cut. It's still a million words, so you're not getting fast action no matter what you do, but at least you don't have the author standing behind you and hitting you on the head to make sure you don't miss any big important points.

So there's a real choice here between two good editions. The Mobi Kindle has the latest edition at length, with no more than the usual errors; the Penguin edition is the first edition and leaves out authorial comments from later editions. No other edition, print or e-book, does what the Penguin paperback does; they're all later editions, one way or another.

P. S.

Just for the heck of it, here are the major errors in the Mobi version of Volume 3, Letter 8 (Letter 100 in the Penguin version, which does not divide into volumes).

Clarissa has asked her friend Anna if Clarissa has done anything wrong. In the Mobi version, Anna says, "And I repeat, I think, your provocations and inducements considered, that ever young creature was who took such a step." The Penguin version is, "And I repeat, I think, your provocations and inducements considered, YOU ARE FREE FROM BLAME: AT LEAST, THE FREEST that ever young creature was that took such a step."

Later in the same letter, Anna says, in the Mobi version, "Pray inform me of every thing that passes between you and him. My cares for you (however needless, from your own prudence) make me wish you to continue to be every minute." The last two words in the Penguin version are "VERY MINUTE"! Amazing what a difference a one-letter typo can make.

So that's two errors in one long letter, in the Mobi version. About what I'd expect, but it was very nice to have the Penguin to check against. At least once a letter, a reader of the Mobi version will see, as above, that something has gone wrong, but if she's like me, she won't quite be able to figure it out. That's life where Kindle classics are concerned. I'm still reading the Mobi because it's so much easier to carry.
It's so easy
Don't be put off by the length. This was really a wonderful book. Once I'd finished the book and knew the story, I wanted to start all over again to savor it's development. The novel really starts to pick up when Lovelace's letters begin. The characters of Lovelace and Anna Howe leap from the page. I would love to see an updated film version. I was continually struck with how contemporary the psychology seemed. It just goes to show you, that human nature is constant. I read Pamela in college and now want to re-read it and also Sir Charles Grandison, which I've never read. Also, I started this novel w/the Penguin Classics edition and halfway through, having purchased the new Kindle Paperwhite, downloaded the last five volumes, for free, on to it. Weighing in at almost 3 lbs in paperback makes this a perfect book to put on an e-reader.

For more insight into the background, themes, symbols, etc. see Sparknotes.
Gavigamand
The 18th century language is a challenge. Although this is an "abridged version," it is still over 500 pages, slow moving and often redundant. I will continue reading for the historical interest. If you're looking for a page-turner, this is not the book for you.