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Download The Past is a Foreign Country ePub

by David Lowenthal

Download The Past is a Foreign Country ePub
  • ISBN 0521224152
  • ISBN13 978-0521224154
  • Language English
  • Author David Lowenthal
  • Publisher Cambridge University Press (February 28, 1986)
  • Pages 516
  • Formats doc lrf docx mobi
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Humanities
  • Size ePub 1535 kb
  • Size Fb2 1131 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 781

In this remarkably wide-ranging book Professor Lowenthal analyses the ever-changing role of the past in shaping our lives. A heritage at once nurturing and burdensome, the past allows us to make sense of the present whilst imposing powerful constraints upon the way that present develops. Some aspects of the past are celebrated, others expunged, as each generation reshapes its legacy in line with current needs. Drawing on all the arts, the humanities and the social sciences, the author uses sources as diverse as science fiction and psychoanalysis to examine how rebellion against inherited tradition has given rise to the modern cult of preservation and pervasive nostalgia. Profusely illustrated, The Past is a Foreign Country shows that although the past has ceased to be a sanction for inherited power or privilege, as a focus of personal and national identity and as a bulwark against massive and distressing change it remains as potent a force as ever in human affairs.

Cambridge Core - Regional and World History: General Interest - The Past Is a Foreign Country – Revisited - by. .

Cambridge Core - Regional and World History: General Interest - The Past Is a Foreign Country – Revisited - by David Lowenthal. He shows how nostalgia and heritage now pervade every facet of public and popular culture. History embraces nature and the cosmos as well as humanity.

Michael Kammen, Cornell University. Everything distinguishable about the past is her. book which you will enjoy if you know that the past attracts you, or if you think that you are immune to its power or its spell. Peter Laslet, Washington Post.

Start by marking The Past Is a Foreign Country as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Past Is a Foreign Country as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. A heritage at once nurturing and burdensome, the past allows us to make sense of the present whilst imposing powerful constraints upon the way that present develops.

Knowing the past: history, fiction, and faction That the novelist deliberately invented was held a virtue; his past was more vital than the historian's because it was partly self-created.

Knowing the past: history, fiction, and faction. The most pellucid pearls of historical narrative are often fount in fiction, long a major component of historical understanding. More people apprehend the past through historical novels, from Walter Scott to Jean Plaidy, than through any formal history. 225 Some novels use history as a backdrop for imaginary characters; others fictionalize the lives of actual figures, inserting invented episodes among real events; still others distort, add, and omit. That the novelist deliberately invented was held a virtue; his past was more vital than the historian's because it was partly self-created.

A heritage at once nurturing and burdensome, the past allows us to make sense of the present whilst imposing powerful constraints upon the way that present develops. Some aspects of the past are celebrated, others expunged, as each generation reshapes its legacy in line with current needs.

Whether we like it or not, the past is everywhere, Lowenthal tells us, and rarely has it been more visible and commercially important: we are surrounded by monuments and relics we can barely comprehend. If the Americans in recent years have led the way, we and other Europeans have followed.

The Past is a Foreign Country may refer to: The Past is a Foreign Country, a book by David Lowenthal, 1985. The Past is a Foreign Country (Il passato è una terra straniera), a book by Gianrico Carofiglio, 2004. The Past Is a Foreign Land, an Italian film of 2008 based on the Carofiglio novel. The Past is a Foreign Country, a South Korean film of 2008. The past is a foreign country", the opening phrase of The Go-Between by L. P. Hartley, 1953. The Past is Another Country (disambiguation).

Talk about The Past is a Foreign Country


Doomblade
That we view history through the filter of our own prejudices and the fallacies of our time is a point that has not been made so eloquently before, as far as I know. (Disclosure: I'm not a historian and have only read a few pages so far but I am deeply impressed.)
Damand
This is a fabulous and provocative read. Lowenthal makes a solid case for the past as a malleable construct of the present that has been different things for different cultures at different times. Lowenthal is at his best when he distinguishes between THE past, which is lost forever and thus utterly inaccessible, and A past that operates in the present that creates it. Overall, a first-rate book for anyone interested in what Nietzsche termed the use and abuse of history.
Delan
I needed a good used book hard back book for a gift. It was in really good shape when received and would recommend it to others.
Kelerius
I read the review of this book and was excited to dive into it. I found the writing to be turgid, with a flow and logic that was not conducive to easy reading. This was not the insightful exploration of ideas of historical images and social memory that the reviews led one to believe. I gave up after the first couple of chapters.
Gavirus
I'm a grad student reading this for a class on 'heritage tourism.' I've enjoyed the flow of his sentences and the interesting images, but I agree with Kenneth (an earlier reviewer): when a hundred-page chapter can be summarized in one page, I've tended to skim quite a bit.

In our class we've read chapters 1,2,5, and 6, and that's made the book a lot more manageable! These chapters have focused on how modern people use the past for present needs, the issues that come with too much focus on the past, and just how we can know 'the past' (through collective history, individual memory, and tangible relics). Chapter 6 is one of the most interesting, as it emphasizes how we change the past (understood as a mental object we've created) through using it and twisting it to serve our purposes.

If you're running short on time, his table of contents and chapter headings are fairly extensive, so it's possible to get a good sense of the book by looking at it's skeleton. Plus, do make time to read at least ten pages or so to get a feel for his writing! If you're a literature sort of person, it's enjoyable and fluid in small doses. :-D
Atineda
This is an ambitious effort. It is a comprehensive effort to understand how Humanity relates to, and makes use of the Past. And a central focus is that Past which is in cultural monuments and great creations.

I admit that reading this book I felt overwhelmed and confused by the multiplicity of categories and uses, by the variety of learning and connections. I seemed to lose my inner checkposts, my way of measuring whether what was being said was true to my experience, or not.

And here I felt the strong distinction between the 'public memory' which as I understand it is by and large the subject of the work, and the kind of private individual memory through which we interpret and give meaning to our own lives.
Tygokasa
Almost encyclopedical in his treatment of Western cultures' relations to their past, Lowenthal gives the reader a roller-coster ride, from time travel fantasies to Viking logos in Minnesota. Lowenthal is more into exploring our relation to the past than debunking myths, thus being more open to the manifold ways we use the past than in his later book "The Heritage Crusade." One problem remains: Lowenthal's idea about the foreign-ness of the past, that we today have a different way of understanding the passing of time than our medieval ancestors, could have benefitted from more elaboration. Still, this is a masterpiece.
This book is a tough read, but a very informative look into why we view history in the way we do.