derrierloisirs.fr
» » Computability and Logic 2ed

Download Computability and Logic 2ed ePub

by George Boolos,Richard C. Jeffrey

Download Computability and Logic 2ed ePub
  • ISBN 0521299675
  • ISBN13 978-0521299671
  • Language English
  • Author George Boolos,Richard C. Jeffrey
  • Publisher Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (February 27, 1981)
  • Pages 304
  • Formats mobi lrf doc rtf
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Humanities
  • Size ePub 1194 kb
  • Size Fb2 1683 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 412


This is a classic and an absolute must for anyone required (or wanting) to gain insight into intermediate logic.

This is a classic and an absolute must for anyone required (or wanting) to gain insight into intermediate logic. Only after significant booloss could the compactness theorem be explained in fifteen minutes. That one is pretty apt. With the Berry paradox, Boolos is able to prove the first incompleteness theorem in approximately half a page (a more standard approach is of course included as well). He has elsewhere explained the second incompleteness theorem using only one-syllable words.

George S. Boolos (Author), Richard C. Jeffrey (Author). With the Berry paradox, Boolos is able to prove the first incompleteness theorem in approximately half a page (a more standard approach is of course included as well)

George S. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Point is: these authors (and, one suspects, Boolos in particular) has (had) an almost scary ability to make difficult things simple and easily comprehensible. That said, I do have a few misgivings.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Руководство по анестезиологии.

Computability and Logic. George S. Boolos, John P. Burgess, Richard C. Jeffrey. Van Heijenoort, Jean (1967) (e., From Frege to Gödel: A Source Book in Mathematical Logic, 1879–1931 (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press). Online ISBN: 9781139164931. A collection of classic papers showing the development of the subject from the origins of truly modern logic through the incompleteness theorems. Enderton, Herbert (2001), A Mathematical Introduction to Logic, 2nd ed. (New York: Harcourt/Academic Press).

Shortly before his death, Boolos chose 30 of his papers to be published in a book. Computability and Logic, 4th ed. Cambridge University Press. The result is perhaps his most highly regarded work, his posthumous Logic, Logic, and Logic.

A table of contents is missing for this source work. Boolos, Richard C. Jeffrey - Computability and Logic. e. Jeffrey Sicha, Wilfrid Sellars - Kant's Transcendental Metaphysics: Sellars' Cassirer Lectures Notes And Other Essays.

112 Logic and Primitive Recursive Functions.

Computability and Logic book. If you like books and love to build cool products, we may be looking for you. Learn more . Genres.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Computability and Logic. Категория: Mathematical logic.

Talk about Computability and Logic 2ed


Bralore
This is a classic and an absolute must for anyone required (or wanting) to gain insight into intermediate logic. A more accessible (and yet more comprehensive) introduction is simply not available. The first part introduces basic concepts of computation, the second goes through the standard stock of important first-order result (culminating, of course, in the incompleteness theorems) whereas the third part goes through various further topics, including the Interpolation theorem (obviously), nonstandard models and provability (especially Loeb's theorem).

And the style? The philosophical lexicon contains the following entry: [boo, n. The length of a mathematical or logical proof; hence, booloss, n., the process of shortening such a proof. "Only after significant booloss could the compactness theorem be explained in fifteen minutes."]. That one is pretty apt. With the Berry paradox, Boolos is able to prove the first incompleteness theorem in approximately half a page (a more standard approach is of course included as well). He has elsewhere explained the second incompleteness theorem using only one-syllable words. Point is: these authors (and, one suspects, Boolos in particular) has (had) an almost scary ability to make difficult things simple and easily comprehensible.

That said, I do have a few misgivings. The typos have of course been mentioned (a list of errata is available on [...] but most have been corrected in the second printing (so if you buy the book new, you'll probably get this one) - there are a few left, however. I am also not sure about some of the changes to the fourth edition. In particular, the structure of the proofs of the completeness, compactness and Löwenheim-Skolem theorems is somewhat surprising, proceeding from two lemmas concerning "satisfaction properties" and "closure properties". It is an interesting move, but will (partially because of the presentation, admittedly) surely be somewhat confusing to anyone coming to these for the first time not already being aware of how they fit together.

That said, there is no way I can give this book less than five stars. There is simply no relevant competition comparable in accessibility and comprehensiveness. Urgently recommended.
Grarana
Excellent!
Peras
This book is regarded as a 'classic' and rightly so. It assumes a minimal background, some familiarity with the propositional calculus. Even this can be dispensed with, if the reader is sufficiently motivated, as there is a well-written review of the first-order logic that one typically learns in an introductory formal logic course.
The book is highly readable. Each chapter begins with a short paragraph outlining the topics in the chapter, how they relate to each other, and how they connect with the topics in later and earlier chapters. These intros by themselves are valuable. The explanations though are what stand out. The authors are somehow able to take the reader's hand and guide him/her leisurely along with plentiful examples, but without getting bogged down in excessive prose. And they are somehow able to cover a substantive amount of material in a short space without seeming rushed or making the text too dense. It's nothing short of miraculous.
What made the book especially appealing to me is that it starts right out with Turing Machines. As a topologist who recently got interested in computational topology, I needed a book that would quickly impart a good, intuitive grasp of the basic notions of computability. I have more "mathematical maturity" than is needed to read an introductory book on computability, so I feel confident in saying that most of the standard texts on computability revel in excessive detail, like defining Turing Machines as a 6-tuple -- something that serves no purpose other than pedantry. This book is different. I particularly liked how the authors stress the intuitive notions underlying the definitions. For example, they lay special emphasis on the Church-Turing thesis, always asking the reader to consider how arguments can be simplified if it were true.
One should note that the emphasis of this book is more towards logic. While it starts with issues of computability, it moves into issues of provability, consistency, etc. The book covers the standards such as Goedel's famous incompleteness theorems in addition to some less standard topics at the end of the book. A small set of instructive exercises follows each chapter.
Cha
I can hardly imagine a better introduction to the topics covered than this book. It discusses virtually everything the intermediate logic student could want: diagonalization, Turing machines, undeciability, indefinability, incompleteness, forcing, and on and on. Although the first few chapters are a bit awkward, the style is generally crystal clear and the examples and metaphors vivid. It's far and away the best read of any text on logic I've yet encountered.
As a mathematician, I was concerned about the books' emphasis on logic rather than mathematics (the text is aimed at philosophy students, too). But the introduction to foundations flows so easily and naturally that I could never complain. Anyone interested in the topic, regardless of their background, could hardly do better (or cheaper) for an introduction.
P.S. - I wanted to give this five stars, but, as other reviewers have pointed out, there are simply too many typos. C'mon, get an editor.