derrierloisirs.fr
» » A House of Many Mansions: The History of Lebanon Reconsidered

Download A House of Many Mansions: The History of Lebanon Reconsidered ePub

by Kamal Salibi

Download A House of Many Mansions: The History of Lebanon Reconsidered ePub
  • ISBN 0520071964
  • ISBN13 978-0520071964
  • Language English
  • Author Kamal Salibi
  • Publisher University of California Press; Reprint edition (October 12, 1990)
  • Pages 254
  • Formats azw rtf txt lrf
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Humanities
  • Size ePub 1577 kb
  • Size Fb2 1584 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 743

Today Lebanon is one of the world's most divided countries. But paradoxically the faction-ridden Lebanese, both Christians and Muslims, have never shown a keener consciousness of common identity. How can this be? In the light of modern scholarship, a famous Lebanese writer and scholar examines the historical myths on which his country's warring communities have based their conflicting visions of the Lebanese nation. He shows that Lebanon cannot afford this divisiveness, that in order to develop and maintain a sense of political unity, it is necesary to distinuish fact from fiction and then build on what is real in the common experience of both groups.Salibi offers a major reinterpretation of Lebanese history and provides remarkable insights into the dynamic of Lebanon's recent conflict. In so doing, he illuminates important facets of his country's present and future. This book also gives a masterly account of how the imagined communities that underlie modern nationalism are created and will be of interest to students of international affairs as well as Near Eastern scholars.

Kamal Salibi was born in Beirut in 1929. He studies in Beirut and London and is currently Professor of History at the American University of Beirut.

Kamal Salibi was born in Beirut in 1929. He has published many articles, among his books are The Modern History of Lebanon and Crossroads to Civil War. Customers who bought this item also bought. Page 1 of 1 Start overPage 1 of 1.

Why Most Lebanese History Books End at 1943 - Продолжительность: 3:01 VOA Learning English Recommended for . History of Lebanon Part 1 3,500 BC-630 AD - Продолжительность: 5:18 Spud History Recommended for you. 5:18.

Why Most Lebanese History Books End at 1943 - Продолжительность: 3:01 VOA Learning English Recommended for you. 3:01.

House of Many Mansions book. Kamal Salibi’s A House of Many Mansions is a comprehensive history of the geographic area now referred to as Lebanon. Today Lebanon is one of the world's most divided countries. It aims to dispel the misinformation about the region’s past that has arisen since it became a nation in 1920.

Salibi Kamal S. Today Lebanon is one of the world's most divided countries - if it remains a country at all. But paradoxically the faction-ridden Lebanese, both Christians and Muslims, have never shown a keener consciousness of common identity. How can this be? The Lebanese historian Kamal S. Salibi examines, in the light of modern scholarship, the historical myths on which his country's warring communities have based their conflicting visions of the Lebanese nation. The Lebanese have always lacked a common vision of their past.

Kamal Salibi is a historian and specialist on the modern Middle East. He has a keen interest in biblical studies and is the author of the bestselling "The Bible Came from Arabia," as well as a highly acclaimed history of "Lebanon, A House of Many Mansions" (. He is a committed Christian. Библиографические данные. A House of Many Mansions: The History of Lebanon Reconsidered. Издание: иллюстрированное, перепечатанное, исправленное.

Volume 52 Issue 2. Kamal Salibi

Volume 52 Issue 2. Kamal Salibi: English Français. Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. Kamal Salibi: A house of many mansions: the history of Lebanon reconsidered, viii, 247 pp. London: .

A House of Many Mansions, The History of Lebanon Reconsidered.

Kamal S. Salibi Today Lebanon is one of the world's most divided countries - if it remains a country at all. Salibi examines, in the light o.

Some of his books are today considered classics, notably A House of Many Mansions: The History of Lebanon . Kamal Salibi wrote three books advocating the controversial "Israel in Arabia" theory

Some of his books are today considered classics, notably A House of Many Mansions: The History of Lebanon Reconsidered (1988) and The Modern History of Jordan (1993). Kamal Salibi wrote three books advocating the controversial "Israel in Arabia" theory. In this view, the place names of the Hebrew Bible actually allude to places in southwest Arabia.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for A House of Many Mansions: The . Kamal S. Salibi examines the historical myths on which his country's warring communities have based their conflicting visions of the Lebanese nation.

Talk about A House of Many Mansions: The History of Lebanon Reconsidered


Faehn
Having just read Robert Fisk's "Pity the Nation", I wanted to learn more about the history of Lebanon ... and acquire more background on the various factions that shaped the area's history in the 1900's. But I was specifically interested in something of a non-partisan, more scholarly bent. Fortunately, Kamal Salibi's book filled the bill. I found it to be eminently readable (I am a layperson as far as history goes) ... but more importantly thoughtful. I would highly recommend it to anyone who would like to sort out the many disparate (and warring, unfortunately) groups who have inhabited the region.
Thetalune
Every single line in this book is a valuable piece of information. It clarifies many of the myths in our oriental history an presents it in real facts using logic and evidence free from bias and prejudice, unlike many historical books that have been written on false basis in order to prove apolitical party correct in its effort to justify a non-existing nationalism.
Anyone interested in the history of the Levant and every Arabic person must read this book.
Lianeni
This is a well-researched and inviting historical narrative on the many different visions for Lebanon. Salibi looks past the state propaganda which taught students that they are descendants from Phoenicians, when in fact the Lebanese people according to the medieval Arabic documents he looks at, are originally from Yemen and Oman. Although he contends that they are a mix of different ethnic groups, he points to an exodus 10 000 years ago from Southern Arabia. Salibi maintains that the desperate attempt to steer Lebanon away from its Arab roots are folly, in that we don't know much about the Phoenicians, because they didn't leave much behind to study. The reader will learn a thing or two he/she did not know before.
LivingCross
An excellent history of Lebanon which should read by all interested in the Middle East conflict.
Bu
This book is very informative politically. I have not finished it and was warned that Salibis work is great if you have a good foundation of the history of what your reading. Each page is packed with information takes a while to absorb, so its a long read. would recommend for political knowledge excellent.
SING
The book was very good, hard to put down. It explained many of the reasons for the situation that existed in Lebanon at that time.
Mr Freeman
Could not put this book down. It's a great resource to explain the origin of Lebanon and Syria. What is amazing is that after so many years of conflicts, Lebanese politicians HAVE NOT learned a thing. (because what happened in the 1500s and 1800s is repeated over and over).

I think it must be a requirement to whoever gets into politics to read this book. Maybe they will eventually learn something and get this country to show the world its true potential.
At the same time, a very professional scholarly work and an enjoyable read. Good at setting the middle eastern context of Lebanese history.
However, the author seems to take sides when he is deconstructing the classical Lebanist version of history (such as the muslim religious persecutions, the mountain refuge, and the Shehabi state), as all his arguments go in the same anti-Lebanist direction.