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by Christopher Hibbert

Download The Days of the French Revolution ePub
  • ISBN 0688007465
  • ISBN13 978-0688007461
  • Language English
  • Author Christopher Hibbert
  • Publisher William Morrow & Co; 1st Morrow quill pbk. ed edition (November 1, 1981)
  • Pages 351
  • Formats mobi lrf mbr lrf
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Humanities
  • Size ePub 1999 kb
  • Size Fb2 1225 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 300

A narrative history of the cataclysmic events surrounding the French Revolution focuses on the events of significant days, from the storming of the Bastille to the bloody Terror and Napoleon's coup

Christopher Hibbert's superb historical narrative The Days of the French Revolution captures de. .

Christopher Hibbert's superb historical narrative The Days of the French Revolution captures de Tocqueville's immediacy but tempers it with the hindsight of history. Detailing events from the meeting of the Estates General at Versailles in 1789 to the coup d'état that brought Napoleon to power 10 years later, The Days of the French Revolution captures the passion and ferocity motivating the events and the individuals that most dramatically shaped the Revolution

Christopher Hibbert The Days of the French Revolution Dedication FOR TERRY AND MOYRA AUTHOR’S NOTE This is a narrative history of the French Revolution from the meeting of the Estates General at Versailles in 1789 to the coup d’état of 18 Brumaire which brought Napoleon to power ten years later. It concentrates upon events and people rather than ideas, particularly upon those journée. This is a narrative history of the French Revolution from the meeting of the Estates General at Versailles in 1789 to the coup d’état of 18 Brumaire which brought Napoleon to power ten years later.

Other Books by Christopher Hibbert. It concentrates upon events and people rather than ideas, particularly upon those journées which helped to decide the course of the Revolution and upon those men and women involved in them.

Электронная книга "The Days of the French Revolution", Christopher Hibbert

Электронная книга "The Days of the French Revolution", Christopher Hibbert. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Days of the French Revolution" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

CHRISTOPHER HIBBERT was born in Leicester in 1924 and educated at Radley and Oriel College, Oxford. Hibbert covers the French Revolution from the meeting of the Estates General to the emergence of Napoleon. Described by the New Statesman as "a pearl of biographers," he has established himself as a leading popular historian whose works reflect meticulous scholarship and has written more than twenty-five histories and biographies. This is roughly ten years of a country's journey from negotiable concern to rampant homicidal psychosis.

PENGUIN BOOKS FLORENCE Christopher Hibbert was born in.The French Revolution. Rome: The Biography of a City. The English: A Social History 1066 – 1945.

PENGUIN BOOKS FLORENCE Christopher Hibbert was born in Leicestershire in 1924 and educated at Radley and Oriel College, Oxford. He served as an infantry officer during the war, was twice. Christopher Hibbert is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and an Hon. D. Litt. of Leicester University. He is married with two sons and a daughter, and lives in Henley-on-Thames.

Christopher Hibbert, an Oxford graduate, has written more than fifty books, including Wellington: A Personal History, London: The Biography of a City, Redcoats and Rebels, and The Destruction of Lord Raglan. He lives with his family in Henley-on-Thames in Oxfordshire, England. Библиографические данные. The Days of the French Revolution.

French Revolution Jeff Lewis - Продолжительность: 2:51 Scott Roller Recommended for yo. The French Revolution: Crash Course World History - Продолжительность: 11:54 CrashCourse Recommended for you. 11:54. Служебный роман 1 серия (комедия, реж.

French Revolution Jeff Lewis - Продолжительность: 2:51 Scott Roller Recommended for you. 2:51. Земля: Биография планеты.

His father, who died when he was three, was a lawyer; one of his uncles a canon at Troyes.

His father, who died when he was three, was a lawyer; one of his uncles a canon at Troyes rs his character seems to have been as carefree and lively as the sparkling wines of the district. His grandfather was a farmer and it was in the country where most of his days were spent and where the accidents, which marred his features for life, took place.

Talk about The Days of the French Revolution


grand star
I recently read Christopher Hibbert's The Days of the French Revolution for a PhD program that I'm in. I was in an undergraduate course on the French Revolution that I was taking for graduate credit, and this book was one of a few assigned to the undergraduates to read. Years ago I had read Hibbert's biography of the Duke of Wellington, and enjoyed it very much. Hibbert has a very easy-to-read style that is both informative and entertaining, (unlike so many dry academic works). With The Days of the French Revolution, Hibbert traces the beginnings of the revolution under Louis XVI's absolutist state, and its increasingly untenable economic position after France's involvement in the American Revolution, and because of France's own internal social and economic reordering (the rise of the bourgeois). Hibbert hits all of the definitive moments of the revolution, and organizes them by "days": the day of the Tennis Court Oath, the day of the fall of the bastille, the day(s) of the women's march on Versailles, The day(s) of the flight to Varennes, etc... Each "day" is placed within the larger context of the revolution, and Hibbert fills in the gaps nicely.

There is an emphasis in this work on the revolution's violence, and the reader is absolutely chilled by Hibbert's descriptions. The role of the Paris mob in hacking the Bastilles' commander de Launay to death, then parading his head around on a pike is as disturbing as anything you're likely to read in George R. R. Martin's "A Game of Thrones" books. This theme is carried through the era of the Terror, and Robespierre's insatiable desire for more victims for Madame de Guillotine. The book is not all about the revolution's violence, however, and Hibbert offers wonderful presentations of Louis' life and family during the period, as well as the political conflict over the Civil Constitution of the Clergy. Hibbert's description of the royal family's return to Paris after the failed flight to Varennes is positively comic: Louis had to hold his young son up to pee in a silver cup because no one wanted to stop the carriage in the summer heat, and the soon-to-be mayor of Paris, Jérôme Pétion flattered himself that the king's sister was flirting with him the whole trip.

The book does a wonderful job of presenting all of the major figures of the period in their proper context: Marat, Danton, Desmoulins, Necker, St. Just, Mirabeau, Sieyès, Bailly, Barras, and more. He also manages to untangle the political movements of the day: the Girondins, the Cordeliers, the Jacobins, the Mountain, the Plain, etc... The books' final chapters and epilogue do a wonderful job of explaining how the revolution did indeed devour its own children, and how the political turmoil of the directory, which returned the revolution to its bourgeois roots, was ultimately usurped by Napoleon.

The Days of the French Revolution is a fantastic voyage through the best and worst of the human condition, and confirms Hibbert's place as a historian with the rare gift of presenting history in a highly readable and engaging manner. Indeed, the work reads like a great novel. Only one imagines fiction would be a lot less bloody.
Malahelm
I will start with what this book does well. Christopher Hibbert is an excellent writer, and his reliance on first hand accounts allows him to create a very vivid and exciting narrative. If you are already relatively familiar with the events of the French Revolution and are simply looking for a good read then this is easily a five star book.

There are some drawbacks to Hibbert's book, however, for those who are not already familiar with the French Revolution and who are looking for a basic introduction.

First, as the title suggests, Hibbert's narrative revolves around certain important days of the French Revolution, including (but not limited to) the storming of the Bastille, the flight of the King, the September prison massacres, the terror, the arrest and execution of Robespierre, and the assumption of power by Napoleon. These episodes are told in great detail but Hibbert does not provide a unified narrative connecting these various episodes.

Second, Hibbert focuses almost entirely on days of violence. Hibbert does not pay much attention to debates taking place in the Conventions or assemblies, to the ideas that animated the revolutionaries, to the economic or social realities of the time, or to the social and political reforms enacted. Instead his narrative focuses, in often brutal and gory detail, on the atrocities committed during the Revolution. You get the feeling that Hibbert does not have much sympathy with the revolutionaries. While this is certainly one side of the revolution, and an important one, it is not the only side. It also gets a bit repetitive reading over and over about out of control mobs cutting people's heads off and displaying them on pikes. The violence of the revolution was real and should not be ignored but it would be nice to get a break in the narrative (and a break from the gore) every once in awhile and read about some of the ideas being discussed, or some of the political reforms being enacted.

Third, Hibbert does not really attempt to explain the various groups that were important in the revolution (the Girondins, Jacobins, sans-coulottes, the Commune, etc.) the ideas that they stood for, or their powers and functions. The most he provides is a brief summary of each group in an appendix which ultimately leaves a lot to be desired. A reader who is interested in the differences that separated the Girondins from the Jacobins, for example, will not get much help from Hibbert.

For these reasons I would say that The Days of the French Revolution is slightly less than ideal as an introduction to the French Revolution. The reader new to the French Revolution will get a basic idea of some of the major events, as well as some of the major players, of the French Revolution, but will not get much in terms of genuine understanding. So as an introduction I would give this book three stars.

Since this book is a five star book for those already familiar with the French Revolution, and a three star book for those new to the French Revolution, I have made my overall review for the book equal to four stars.