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Download Uncommon Wisdom: Conversations With Remarkable People ePub

by Fritjof Capra

Download Uncommon Wisdom: Conversations With Remarkable People ePub
  • ISBN 0671473220
  • ISBN13 978-0671473228
  • Language English
  • Author Fritjof Capra
  • Publisher Simon & Schuster (January 1, 1988)
  • Pages 334
  • Formats doc lrf txt azw
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Humanities
  • Size ePub 1133 kb
  • Size Fb2 1442 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 954

Addressing new trends in holistic health, healing, medicine, psychotheraphy, science, and politics, this book charts the evolution of New-Age consciousness

Uncommon Wisdom by Fritjof Capra consists of a series of eight chapters featuring information about famous people such as Werner Heisenberg, J. Krishnamurti, Gregory Bateson, Margaret Lock, . Schumacher and several others

Uncommon Wisdom by Fritjof Capra consists of a series of eight chapters featuring information about famous people such as Werner Heisenberg, J. Schumacher and several others. While some of these chapters are interesting, I found that the focus of most of them was on the author, his life and views. In that sense the book is more of an infomercial than a genuine discussion with these prominent people. If you decide to read it my advice is to skip through the personal stuff and focus on what information there is from the scholars and.

Uncommon Wisdom book. Start by marking Uncommon Wisdom: Conversations With Remarkable People as Want to Read

Uncommon Wisdom book. Start by marking Uncommon Wisdom: Conversations With Remarkable People as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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Capra, Fritjof, New Age movement. New York : Simon and Schuster. Books for People with Print Disabilities. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Bibliography: p. Includs index. His books would take me as far as one could go with books and would stimulate me to go further through direct, nonverbal experience.

Uncommon Wisdom by Fritjof Capra (Paperback, 1989). Author(s): Capra, Fritjof. Title: Uncommon Wisdom: Conversations with Remarkable People (Flamingo). Read full description.

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Uncommon Wisdom, by Fritjof Capra, is not strictly speaking a science book, but it elucidates much about the scientist Fritjof Capra and the . Conversations with Remarkable People, New York: Bantam Books, 1989.

Uncommon Wisdom, by Fritjof Capra, is not strictly speaking a science book, but it elucidates much about the scientist Fritjof Capra and the method of his special approach to knowledge gathering b. Uncommon Wisdom, by Fritjof Capra, is not strictly speaking a science book, but it elucidates much about the scientist Fritjof Capra and the method of his special approach to knowledge gathering by exchanging views with others, so as to achieve at a multi-vectorial perspective.

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Talk about Uncommon Wisdom: Conversations With Remarkable People


Mall
As in all of his books, Fritjof Capra gives us a holistic sense of the world. In this case, he calls upon the ideas and foundations of others, incorporated into his work and thought through meetings and interviews over many years. The book is told in a rather chronological order, and shows the way that Capra developed his philosophy over the 70's and 80's through self-evaluation, critical thought, and incorporation of other philosophies. The people who contributed in this book include: Werner Heisenberg, J. Krishnamurti, Geoffrey Chew, Gregory Bateson, Stanslaf Grof, R.D. Liang, Carl Simonton, Margaret Lock, E.F. Schumacher, and Hazel Henderson, among many others. Many thanks to the author and the contributors for their depth, insight, and teachings.
This book, though written entertainingly in a novelesque way, is actually quite useful for research purposes, and could easily be used as a reference.
Darksinger
i'm still reading it;
Huston
a most excellent work. I loved reading the thoughts of so many interesting people! and it was very well written
Pettalo
Excellent information and delivery time.
Thanks, Rachel Porias
Fountain_tenderness
Very thought provoking
allegro
No book has had a greater influence on my scholarly research, community perspective, and/or understanding of complex structures. Capra gives the reader the opportunity to ascertain a semblance of clarity regarding the structures that define societies/cultures.
invasion
Uncommon Wisdom by Fritjof Capra consists of a series of eight chapters featuring information about famous people such as Werner Heisenberg, J. Krishnamurti, Gregory Bateson, Margaret Lock, R.D. Laing, E.F. Schumacher and several others. While some of these chapters are interesting, I found that the focus of most of them was on the author, his life and views. In that sense the book is more of an infomercial than a genuine discussion with these prominent people. If you decide to read it my advice is to skip through the personal stuff and focus on what information there is from the scholars and intellectuals Capra meets. Better yet read the actual works of the people Capra discusses. Mine is the first negative rating. My guess is the other raters agree with his views on the connection between material things and spiritual ones. I do as well; I just don;t like Capra's overweening ego that engulfs whatever ideas are presented.
'Uncommon Wisdom' is not strictly speaking a science book, but it elucidates much about the scientist Fritjof Capra and the method of his special approach to knowledge gathering by exchanging views with others, so as to achieve at a multi-vectorial perspective. It is a very readable and from the human point of view highly interesting book, for it shows with many examples that we arrive at a mature judgment of any problem only by exchanging with others, and if the field of study is outside our professional expertise, by consulting with the best experts in the field.

I reviewed the book only recently, and after my second lecture of the book. Previously, I had been convinced that the book cannot be reviewed as it is very personal, autobiographic and contains many conversations difficult if not impossible to paraphrase without actually quoting them. To quote them entirely was excluded because of copyright, so I had to mark the main points only.

First of all, I reflected why I should review the book. After my initial hesitation, and reading it once again, I came to realize that it is actually a very important document, because it relates the transition that the author made from 'The Tao of Physics (1975)' to 'The Turning Point (1987)', and how Capra was receiving broad feedback and support from other scientists, psychologists, psychiatrists and medical doctors to discuss his paradigm-changing research, and the project for the upcoming book that was certainly challenging to write. As such, the book is something like a background study for Capra’s upcoming bestseller The Turning Point (1987) while it was published two years after the latter.

The book contains conversations with Werner Heisenberg, J. Krishnamurti, Geoffrey Chew, Gregory Bateson, Stanislav Grof, R.D. Laing, Carl Simonton, Margaret Lock, E.F. Schumacher, Hazel Henderson, and Indira Gandhi. In addition, the so-called Big Sur Dialogues, a conversation about paradigm changes in medicine, at the Esalen Institute, which was led by Capra, and to which attended and contributed Gregory Bateson, Antonio Dimalanta, Stanislav Grof, Hazel Henderson, Margaret Lock, Leonard Shlain and Carl Simonton.

'Uncommon Wisdom' is a must-read for everyone who wants to be informed how, since more than two decades, our fundamental scientific paradigms are changing toward a holistic worldview. All the scholars Fritjof Capra met, and other people he mentioned in this book do not need to be introduced, as they are world-famous.

To begin with, I could not say which part of the book I liked best and which part, as it is often the case, was of lesser interest to me. It was all one fascinating read from the first to the last word. Perhaps, yes, the most captivating accounts for me were Capra’s meetings with Gregory Bateson, Stanislav Grof and Ronald David Laing. This is by the way my experience with all of Capra’s books, and I believe this has to do with both his scientific honesty and his clear, and careful writing style that doesn’t venture into speculations, but still conveys also the emotional nature of the author. Capra is perhaps exceptional among scientists in that respect, and in this book this becomes particularly evident, as it retraces also his hippie years, and his spirit of adventure as a young man, lover, artist and scientist.

What emerges from the lecture of this book is a deep insight not only in the scientific subjects discussed in it, but in the way Capra researches. As he has outlined it in his lecture at Grace Cathedral, San Francisco, in November 2007, his research method is unique in that he doesn’t as other researchers base his knowledge-gathering on books, as the primary source of information, but on their authors. Over the many years of his research and publishing, he managed to always get in touch with the authors of the books he found important for his research, and bonds with them, and often actually befriends them. Sometimes, he spontaneously sent a manuscript to some of them, and received valuable feedback.

In this way, Fritjof Capra has befriended many great minds over the last thirty years, among them those featured in this fascinating and very personal book.