derrierloisirs.fr
» » Producing India: From Colonial Economy to National Space (Chicago Studies in Practices of Meaning)

Download Producing India: From Colonial Economy to National Space (Chicago Studies in Practices of Meaning) ePub

by Manu Goswami

Download Producing India: From Colonial Economy to National Space (Chicago Studies in Practices of Meaning) ePub
  • ISBN 0226305082
  • ISBN13 978-0226305080
  • Language English
  • Author Manu Goswami
  • Publisher University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (June 15, 2004)
  • Pages 400
  • Formats azw lrf doc mobi
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Humanities
  • Size ePub 1757 kb
  • Size Fb2 1950 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 133

When did categories such as a national space and economy acquire self-evident meaning and a global reach? Why do nationalist movements demand a territorial fix between a particular space, economy, culture, and people?Producing India mounts a formidable challenge to the entrenched practice of methodological nationalism that has accorded an exaggerated privilege to the nation-state as a dominant unit of historical and political analysis. Manu Goswami locates the origins and contradictions of Indian nationalism in the convergence of the lived experience of colonial space, the expansive logic of capital, and interstate dynamics. Building on and critically extending subaltern and postcolonial perspectives, her study shows how nineteenth-century conceptions of India as a bounded national space and economy bequeathed an enduring tension between a universalistic political economy of nationhood and a nativist project that continues to haunt the present moment.Elegantly conceived and judiciously argued, Producing India will be invaluable to students of history, political economy, geography, and Asian studies.

When did categories such as a national space and economy acquire self-evident meaning and a global reach? Why do nationalist movements demand a territorial fix between a particular space, economy, culture, and people? Producing India mounts a formidable challenge to th. .

When did categories such as a national space and economy acquire self-evident meaning and a global reach? Why do nationalist movements demand a territorial fix between a particular space, economy, culture, and people? Producing India mounts a formidable challenge to the entrenched practice of methodological nationalism that has accorded an exaggerated privilege to the nation-state as a dominant unit of historical and political analysis

Chicago Studies in Practices of Meaning

Chicago Studies in Practices of Meaning.

Elegantly conceived and judiciously argued, Producing India will be invaluable to students of history, political economy, geography, and Asian studies.

book by Manu Goswami. When did categories such as a national space and economy acquire self-evident meaning and a global reach? Why do nationalist movements demand a territorial fix between a particular space, economy, culture, and people? Producing India mounts a formidable challenge to the entrenched practice of methodological nationalism that has accorded an exaggerated privilege to the nation-state as a dominant unit of historical and political analysis.

Download full-text PDF. Producing India: From Colonial Economy to National . Producing India: From Colonial Economy to National Economy, Manu Goswami.

Producing India book. Start by marking Producing India: From Colonial Economy to National Space as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

From the interior of the Sun, to the upper atmosphere and near-space . In this new book, a distinguished panel makes recommendations for the nation's programs.

From the interior of the Sun, to the upper atmosphere and near-space environment of Earth. Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future. The intelligence community (IC) plays an essential role in the national security of the United. Astronomy and Astrophysics in the New Millennium. Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond.

Chicago studies in practices of meaning. 0226305082, 0226305090. What are reading intentions? Setting up reading intentions help you organise your course reading. It makes it easy to scan through your lists and keep track of progress. Here's an example of what they look like: Your reading intentions are also stored in your profile for future reference. How do I set a reading intention.

When did categories such as a national space and economy acquire self-evident meaning and a global reach? .

When did categories such as a national space and economy acquire self-evident meaning and a global reach? Why do nationalist movements demand a territorial fix between a particular space, economy, culture, and people? Producing India mounts a formidable challenge to the entrenched practice of methodological nationalism that has accorded an exaggerated privilege to the nation-state as a dominant unit of historical and political analysis

When did categories such as a national space and economy acquire . Manu Goswami locates the origins and contradictions of Indian.

When did categories such as a national space and economy acquire self-evident meaning and a global reach? Why do nationalist movements demand a territorial fix between a particular space, economy, culture, and people? Producing India mounts a formidable challenge to the entrenched practice of methodological nationalism that has accorded an exaggerated privilege to the nation-state as a dominant unit of historical and political analysis.

Talk about Producing India: From Colonial Economy to National Space (Chicago Studies in Practices of Meaning)


Tar
I don't think the first review provides a fair rating of this breathtaking book. Goswami really illuminates the process by which "India" gets produced in discourse by the colonists. She shows a rare mastery of the precolonial connotations of words like "naksha" or map, and is able to detail what happens to these abstract concepts when the British, aided by the Indian scholars they cultivate, translate the ancient Sanskrit into English. This is just one example of many sleights of hand - or meaning - that led to our understanding of modern India. Her work is a must-read for anyone seriously interested in understanding the history of India, or the discursive workings of colonization. I would not recommend this book for most undergraduates, but are we to let undergraduates set the level for all scholarly writing? Should we all just settle for reading dumbed down history bytes and give up on the attempt to understand an incredibly complex historical process, or perhaps give up entirely on intellectual culture and the honest attempt to be better readers and thinkers?
Bodwyn
I write this review with some hesitation, but I think it is necessary. I have met Goswami and like her as a person (thank heavens I'm using a pen name), but criticism is due here in the interests of students who are doubtless struggling with this book. Producing India is a very difficult read. I know many people who have read this book and spent countless hours trying to make sense of it, presuming all the while that it is their own fault for not understanding the argument. That is an unsurprising state of mind for an earnest undergraduate or a new graduate student, still new to the game and striving to master those classic books that senior scholars consider to be "good" -- because they're "important," or "path-breaking," or "revolutionary," or whatever reason is given for why this book ought to be read.

If you have stumbled upon my review and are having difficulty understanding this book, I want to suggest to you most emphatically that the failure belongs to Goswami. Her writing is impenetrable. Every insightful idea (and there are more than a few) is shrouded in a forest of jargon and labyrinthine sentences (almost completely devoid of nouns). It is intellectual exhibitionism in its finest and most esoteric form. Some whole paragraphs appear to spend lots of words saying nothing at all, as for example in the one quoted below, found in the introduction, coming to exactly 100 words, which you may skip if you like in the interest of seeing my actual review later on:

"This book situates and addresses these theoretical and methodological concerns - the task of demonstrating the intrinsic relationship between sociohistorical forms, categories of understanding, and forms of subjectivity and of integrating apparently distinct spatial scales and temporalities - in historical and analytical practice. In this respect, the nonlinear narrative structure of the book, its focus on the differential logics and effects of political-economic and cultural processes on multiple spatiotemporal scales, its attempt to weld together "thick description" and wider analytical frames, and its emphasis on the joint determinations between shifts in meaning and materiality are as important as its explicit theoretical content."

One can hardly imagine a more opaque, mystifying, and incomprehensible description of what the book is trying to do. Nevertheless, we do not want to be accused of not trying. The book does in fact contain several big ideas that are useful and insightful, and it introduces the germs of many other small ideas that could have been developed in a better study. Goswami appears, on the whole, to be a very intelligent scholar with a lot of innovative things to say. Perhaps she may turn out like a Timothy Mitchell, whose first book, Colonising Egypt, was difficult and overly theoretical but whose later work became quite impressive indeed.

So what is Producing India all about? Again I hesitate to provide a summary for fear of revealing that I do not fully understand the project Goswami is really undertaking. As stated before, however, I think we can all be forgiven for a little inaccuracy when we're dealing with what is practically a different language. It is difficult, in fact, to even summarize Goswami's ideas and arguments without using some of the jargon and opaque language that characterizes the text throughout, so please bear with me.

Goswami's purpose is, first, to conceptualize Indian nationalism as it developed over the longer term (i.e. from the beginnings of British rule), and, secondly, to explain the roots of disunity that eventually led to partition in 1947. When, she asks, did the idea of India emerge as a territorially bounded national entity? How did the geographical place of modern India differ from the discursive historical space that the nation and the nationalist community eventually occupied? Goswami argues that nationalism and the conception of national space were co-constituted by (i) imperial rule and (ii) the capitalist economy. She traces the idea of nationalism to the demise of the East India Company in 1858. In its place developed the modern British Raj of direct rule via the India Office in London and the Viceroy, a development that "inaugurated a spectacular reworking of the institutional, political-economic, and spatial coordinates of the colonial state, its technologies of power, and its material and epistemological modes of reproduction." British rulers after 1858, she explains attempted to bring order to the complex realities of India. The revolution in the bureaucratic government of India and the rapid economic integration of the subcontinent, based on the construction of railways in the 1860s, helped to establish the territorial space of modern India. Thus, as she writes, the "geographic space of colonial India became the territorial unit and organizing frame" for bureaucratic practice and colonial administration. It therefore became possible after 1858 to imagine a new national space based on the boundaries of the colonial state.

Anti-colonial nationalists led the way in imagining India as a nation and in articulating a discursive formation based on the physical boundaries of modern India. During the late nineteenth century, Indian intellectuals, such as R.C. Dutt, "summoned the analytical and normative categories of a specifically national developmentalist framework to ground their doubled critique of both colonial rule and classical political economy." Such nationalists critiques of colonialism were based on a conception of a specifically "Indian" national economy that was in turn based on the idea of India as a bounded national space. In attempting to critique a "drain" on the "nation," these critics were proposing an alternative promise of development to be achieved within the same national space -- only by Indians, not the British. This argument suggests that the very idea of India as a bounded territorial entity could not have been possible without Britain's presence in the subcontinent and the general unity the Raj promoted in social, economic, and political affairs from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. The effect of British colonialism in India was thus to precipitate "a radical politics of autonomy that demand an absolute congruence between the territory, history, and economy of the imagined nation."

At the same time, however, the spatial demarcation of the national territory gave rise in the early decades of the twentieth century to what Goswami calls "territorial nativism, which imagined the national space of India to be essentially Hindu. Territorial nativists developed a discourse as "Bharat," a definite territory borrowed from older Puranic categories that was presented as flowing continuously from a Hindu past to a colonial present, wherein India as a national was indelibly marked by its Hindu heritage. By such means, the attempt to present a conception of a space uncontaminated by colonialism helped to limit the definition of what the national space represented and included. The "foreign" body of Muslims was the principal casualty. As Goswami writes, the "very practices that homogenized social relations also engendered new forms of differentiation and deepened socioeconomic and cultural unevenness." Goswami's study, in sum, suggests several innovative ways to go beyond strictly internal histories of India and Indian nationalism. Instead of seeing nationalism as the product of the foundation of the Indian National Congress in 1885, one can look to the 1850s or even earlier, when a "national" critique emerged against both the capitalist economy and the British attempts to order the complex realities of India.

Brave students who have attempted to read Producing India will realize that my summary is incredibly simplified and perhaps even a partial picture of what Goswami intended to say. For the fact remains that her book is incredibly difficult, quite perplexing, perhaps even a load of nonsense dressed up in language that could have been extracted from an essay produced by the Postmodern Generator. Academic reviews of the book have produced summaries falling all over the map, depending on what fragment of Goswami's argument most stuck in that reviewer's mind. Such are the problems with impenetrable writing: the message cannot be fully understood precisely because the presentation in writing is so deplorable. The unfortunate consequence of this impossible writing is that Goswami's critiques of the nationalist idea and the capitalist economy will have a decidedly weak effect on her intended audience. No undergraduate is going to be persuaded by arguments they cannot understand. Few graduates students are going to be attracted to her method of history or theoretical approach. Few seasoned scholars will even bother to read it.

I can almost imagine Goswami and her acolytes now, smugly dismissing my review because I failed to grasp the essentials. To which my response would be, of course, that she should have written it in a way that I could understand. I hardly think that I'm an illiterate slouch. I have spent the last four years of my PhD program in history reading every variety of academic monograph -- to the tune of some 700 titles -- and this book is probably the most egregious case of bad writing I have yet encountered. Thanks to Producing India, I now have an answer when my advisors ask me to identify the worst book of the lot.