derrierloisirs.fr
» » Military Aspects of the Vietnam Conflict (The United States and Vietnam War, Vol. 2)

Download Military Aspects of the Vietnam Conflict (The United States and Vietnam War, Vol. 2) ePub

by Walter L. Hixson

Download Military Aspects of the Vietnam Conflict (The United States and Vietnam War, Vol. 2) ePub
  • ISBN 0815335326
  • ISBN13 978-0815335320
  • Language English
  • Author Walter L. Hixson
  • Publisher Routledge; 1st edition (June 22, 2000)
  • Pages 344
  • Formats lit lrf doc txt
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Humanities
  • Size ePub 1941 kb
  • Size Fb2 1873 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 636

Available as a single volume or as part of the 6 volume set Vietnam War

Opposition to United States involvement in the Vietnam War began with demonstrations in 1964 against the escalating role of the . military in the Vietnam War and grew into a broad social movement over the ensuing several years.

Opposition to United States involvement in the Vietnam War began with demonstrations in 1964 against the escalating role of the . This movement informed and helped shape the vigorous and polarizing debate, primarily in the United States, during the second half of the 1960s and early 1970s on how to end the war.

The role of the United States in the Vietnam War began after World War II and escalated into full commitment during the Vietnam War from 1955 to 1973.

The Vietnam Conflict Extract Data File of the Defense Casualty Analysis System (DCAS) Extract Files contains records of 58,220 . military fatal casualties of the Vietnam War. These records were transferred into the custody of the National Archives and Records Administration in 2008. The earliest casualty record contains a date of death of June 8, 1956, and the most recent casualty record contains a date of death of May 28, 2006. The Defense Casualty Analysis System Extract Files were created by the Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC) of the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

A book that goes far beyond the ambitions of earlier writers by synthesizing the difficult story of United States intervention . Gabriel Kolko has gone far beyond the obvious military, political, and economic aspects of the war to explore in-depth causative factors leading to the end result.

A book that goes far beyond the ambitions of earlier writers by synthesizing the difficult story of United States intervention with the yet more complicated internal dynamic of the Vietnamese Revolution. A stylish, passionate, stimulating, and provocative work that needs to be read by anyone concerned about the overweening role of the United States in the world. Richard Gott, Manchester Guardian. Of interest to anyone wishing to study the Vietnam War in all of its ramifications.

Vietnam War (1954–75), conflict that pitted the communist government of North Vietnam and its allies in South Vietnam, the .

Vietnam War (1954–75), conflict that pitted the communist government of North Vietnam and its allies in South Vietnam, the Viet Cong, against South Vietnam and its principal ally, the United States. Why did the Vietnam War start? The United States had provided funding, armaments, and training to South Vietnam’s government and military since Vietnam’s partition into the communist North and the democratic South in 1954. Tensions escalated into armed conflict between the two sides, and in 1961 . John F. Kennedy chose to expand the military aid program.

The origins of the Vietnam War are rooted in centuries of resistance by the .

The origins of the Vietnam War are rooted in centuries of resistance by the Vietnamese from foreign control. Following periodic domination by the Chinese, the French colonized Vietnam and neighboring Laos and Cambodia in the mid-19th century. The United States, however, fearing a communist victory, blocked the elections from taking place. The early opposition to the Vietnam War was largely restricted to pacifists and leftists empowered by the successful application of strategic nonviolent action in the . Civil Rights Movement.

The Vietnam War lasted ten years, cost America 58,000 lives . The US defeat in Vietnam was a political choice, not a military necessity.

The Vietnam War lasted ten years, cost America 58,000 lives and over a trillion dollars, adjusted for inflation. It brought down a president, stirred social unrest and ended in defeat. No one in hindsight believes fighting a losing war is ever worth the cost. Consequently, the Vietnam War is usually written off as a colossal strategic blunder and a humanitarian disaster. Yet historical appraisals might have been much different had the Vietnam War followed the pattern of the Korean War which the United States fought for almost identical reasons – the defense of freedom in Asia.

The United States eventually supports an anticommunist government led . More:The Vietnam War: Why it was the conflict that no one wanted to talk about

The United States eventually supports an anticommunist government led by Ngo Dinh Diem in the South. 10, 1960: Le Duan replaces Ho Chi Minh as First Secretary of the Vietnamese Communist Party in Hanoi. Nov. 8, 1960: John F. Kennedy beats Richard Nixon in the . presidential election; Lyndon B. Johnson is vice president. May 4, 1970: Four days after Nixon announced the expansion of the war into Cambodia, four students at Kent State are shot by National Guardsmen during a protest. More:The Vietnam War: Why it was the conflict that no one wanted to talk about. More:Why Ken Burns decided this was the time to make a Vietnam War documentary.

The Vietnam War rallies and protests started on college campuses and became a massive movement that .

The Vietnam War rallies and protests started on college campuses and became a massive movement that helped shape public opinion and government policy. Vietnam had been divided into North and South Vietnam, and American officials resolved to prop up the government of South Vietnam as it fought against a communist insurgency supported by North Vietnam. In the early 1960s, most Americans would have viewed the conflict in Vietnam as a minor proxy war between the United States and the Soviet Union. Americans were comfortable supporting the anti-communist side. And as so few Americans were involved, it wasn't a terribly volatile issue.