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Download Sterilization of Carrie Buck: Was She Feebleminded or Society's Pawn? ePub

by David Smith

Download Sterilization of Carrie Buck: Was She Feebleminded or Society's Pawn? ePub
  • ISBN 088282192X
  • ISBN13 978-0882821924
  • Language English
  • Author David Smith
  • Publisher New Horizon Press (August 10, 1999)
  • Pages 200
  • Formats lrf docx lrf rtf
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Humanities
  • Size ePub 1536 kb
  • Size Fb2 1300 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 614

Though she had normal intelligence, Carrie Buck was labeled "feebleminded" because she was young, poor, female and powerless. Her child was taken away and she was sterilized. Her landmark Supreme Court case, which led to the sterilization of 50,000 Americans and was cited as the precedent for the Nazi race hygiene program, is still making headlines today.

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Though she had normal intelligence, Carrie Buck was labeled "feebleminded" because she was young, poor, female and powerless. Her child was taken away and she was sterilized

Though she had normal intelligence, Carrie Buck was labeled "feebleminded" because she was young, poor, female and powerless. Her child was taken away and she was sterilized. Her landmark Supreme Court case, which led to the sterilization of 50,000 Americans and was cited as the precedent for the Nazi race hygiene program, is still making headlines today.

The Sterilization of Carrie Buck : Was She Feebleminded or Society's Pawn. by K. Ray Nelson and J. David Smith. Eugenics is the pure-bred descendant of Darwin's theory, an error compounded from a mistaken belief system. Chapter 1 tells of Carrie Buck's poverty-stricken childhood. She was adopted at age 3 and became a servant.

com's J. David Smith Page and shop for all J. David Smith books. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of J.

Sterilization of Carrie Buck. On October 27, 1927, 21-year-old Carrie Buck was sterilized without her understanding or consent – and with the blessings of the United States Supreme Court. Now, the truth about one of America's most shameful moments is revealed in The Sterilization of Carrie Buck.

Carrie’s mother, Emma Buck, was deemed feebleminded and sexually . Even more important, Carrie was raped by a relative of her foster family

Carrie’s mother, Emma Buck, was deemed feebleminded and sexually promiscuous, and involuntarily institutionalized at the Virginia Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded in Lynchburg, Virginia. Then 17 years old, Carrie, believed to have inherited these traits, was committed to the same asylum after giving birth to an illegitimate daughter, Vivian. Even more important, Carrie was raped by a relative of her foster family. Recent scholarship has shown that Carrie Buck’s sterilization was based on a false diagnosis and her defense lawyer conspired with the lawyer for the Virginia Colony to guarantee that the sterilization law would be upheld in court.

The surgery, carried out while Buck was an inmate of the Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded, took place under the authority of the Racial Integrity Act of 1924, part of the Commonwealth of Virginia's eugenics program.

Talk about Sterilization of Carrie Buck: Was She Feebleminded or Society's Pawn?


Umge
The Sterilization of Carrie Buck, J. David Smith and K. Ray Nelson

The `Foreword' quotes Stephen Jay Gould as saying the forced sterilization of Carrie Buck was comparable to the Scopes Trial, but with a greater impact on people's lives that the belief in creationism (p.xv). Eugenics is the pure-bred descendant of Darwin's theory, an error compounded from a mistaken belief system. Chapter 1 tells of Carrie Buck's poverty-stricken childhood. She was adopted at age 3 and became a servant. She was a normal child during her 5 years of schooling (p.3). After a family member raped her, Carrie was turned out of the only home she knew by being classified as "feeble-minded" (p.5). Chapter 2 tells how Emma Buck, Carrie's mother, was committed to a state institution. It does not explain the cause. Carrie's child was adopted by the very family that claimed Carrie was "feeble-minded" (p.23)! The Superintendent of this "Colony" was a believer in eugenics (p.29). The hidden agenda of Dr. Albert Priddy was to use sterilization to provide servants or concubines to "good families" with the "normal functions of any woman" (p.33)! Dr. Priddy had been rebuked by the judge in an earlier case, Mallory v. Priddy for sterilizing a wife and daughter (p.36).

Sterilization laws had been declared unconstitutional as being class legislation (patients in state institutions) when done without due process and depriving a person of their natural right to procreate (pp.49-50). Public sentiment was against this; but when it was changed a law was passed. Then a test case was needed. The "expert witness" never met Carrie Buck (p.59)! Carrie Buck's lawyer, Irving Whitehead, was a close friend to Strode (p.86). Chapter 7 has the testimony of neighbors at the Trial. In Chapter 8 Whitehead argued that sterilization and release could spread venereal disease (pp.120-122)! Estabrook testified from a fashion cloaked as a science (p.131). There was scant scientific evidence for Carrie's "feeble-mindedness" (p.141). Research was funded by a millionaire (p.146). The Dobbs would take Carrie back if only she was sterilized (p.165)! Carrie's daughter was a normal and average student (p.171); she later died of measles.

The sterilization judgment was appealed: it deprived a citizen of the right to procreate without due process of law; it violated the Fourteenth Amendment of equal protection under the law for all; it violated the Eighth Amendment (p.175). The Trial Testimony was based on hearsay. Whitehead said upholding this law created the "worse kind of tyranny" where the state would have god-like power while the state is nothing more that a faction of politicians (p.176). Oliver Wendell Holmes took pleasure in deciding for the State of Virginia (p.178). [Senility?] This Virginia law was adopted by the Third Reich in 1933. Afterwards Carrie was placed as a domestic servant (p.187). She later married (twice), but her last years were spent in poverty.

Statistics can manipulate collected data so as to support opposing conclusions (p.224). The young and poor from small communities were the common victims of sterilization (p.234). The looniness of eugenics advocates is shown on page 247: a cure-all for poverty and ignorance! [Poverty is the result of the Ruling Class's powers.] Elmer Pendell's poll of his students is dishonest (p.251). The eugenics falsehood still lives in the consciousness of many people (the Big Lie technique). Science knows that a lack of proper nutrition can cause many of the defects called "feeble-mindedness"; this is a result of poverty and oppression. This book lacks an index. [There used to be a "mad scientist" character in popular entertainment of the past; I now understand this.]
Windforge
The Sterilization of Carrie Buck, by J. David Smith and K. Ray Nelson

The `Foreword' quotes Stephen Jay Gould as saying the forced sterilization of Carrie Buck was comparable to the Scopes Trial, but with a greater impact on people's lives that the belief in creationism (p.xv). Eugenics is the pure-bred descendant of Darwin's theory, an error compounded from a mistaken belief system. Chapter 1 tells of Carrie Buck's poverty-stricken childhood. She was adopted at age 3 and became a servant. She was a normal child during her 5 years of schooling (p.3). After a family member raped her, Carrie was turned out of the only home she knew by being classified as "feeble-minded" (p.5). Chapter 2 tells how Emma Buck, Carrie's mother, was committed to a state institution. It does not explain the cause. Carrie's child was adopted by the very family that claimed Carrie was "feeble-minded" (p.23)! The Superintendent of this "Colony" was a believer in eugenics (p.29). The hidden agenda of Dr. Albert Priddy was to use sterilization to provide servants or concubines to "good families" with the "normal functions of any woman" (p.33)! Dr. Priddy had been rebuked by the judge in an earlier case, Mallory v. Priddy for sterilizing a wife and daughter (p.36).

Sterilization laws had been declared unconstitutional as being class legislation (patients in state institutions) when done without due process and depriving a person of their natural right to procreate (pp.49-50). Public sentiment was against this; but when it was changed a law was passed. Then a test case was needed. The "expert witness" never met Carrie Buck (p.59)! Carrie Buck's lawyer, Irving Whitehead, was a close friend to Strode (p.86). Chapter 7 has the testimony of neighbors at the Trial. In Chapter 8 Whitehead argued that sterilization and release could spread venereal disease (pp.120-122)! Estabrook testified from a fashion cloaked as a science (p.131). There was scant scientific evidence for Carrie's "feeble-mindedness" (p.141). Research was funded by a millionaire (p.146). The Dobbs would take Carrie back if only she was sterilized (p.165)! Carrie's daughter was a normal and average student (p.171); she later died of measles.

The sterilization judgment was appealed: it deprived a citizen of the right to procreate without due process of law; it violated the Fourteenth Amendment of equal protection under the law for all; it violated the Eighth Amendment (p.175). The Trial Testimony was based on hearsay. Whitehead said upholding this law created the "worse kind of tyranny" where the state would have god-like power while the state is nothing more that a faction of politicians (p.176). Oliver Wendell Holmes took pleasure in deciding for the State of Virginia (p.178). [Senility?] This Virginia law was adopted by the Third Reich in 1933. Afterwards Carrie was placed as a domestic servant (p.187). She later married (twice), but her last years were spent in poverty.

Statistics can manipulate any body of data so as to support opposing conclusions (p.224). The young and poor from small communities were the common victims of sterilization (p.234). The looniness of eugenics advocates is shown on page 247: a cure-all for poverty and ignorance! [Poverty is the result of the Ruling Class's powers.] Elmer Pendell's poll of his students is dishonest (p.251). The eugenics falsehood still lives in the consciousness of many people (the Big Lie technique). Science knows that a lack of proper nutrition can cause many of the defects called "feeble-mindedness"; this is a result of poverty and oppression. This book lacks an index. [There used to be a "mad scientist" character in popular entertainment of the past; I now understand this.]