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Download The Early Preaching of Karl Barth: Fourteen Sermons with Commentary by William H. Willimon ePub

by William H. Willimon,Karl Barth

Download The Early Preaching of Karl Barth: Fourteen Sermons with Commentary by William H. Willimon ePub
  • ISBN 0664233678
  • ISBN13 978-0664233679
  • Language English
  • Author William H. Willimon,Karl Barth
  • Publisher Westminster John Knox Press; 1 edition (September 2, 2009)
  • Pages 190
  • Formats lrf rtf azw doc
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Humanities
  • Size ePub 1268 kb
  • Size Fb2 1953 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 290

Westminster John Knox Press is proud to present this special collection of fourteen of Karl Barth's World War I-era sermons--the only English language collection of Barth's sermons preached between 1917 and 1920 when he was a parish pastor in Safenwil, Switzerland. This volume offers a fascinating glimpse into Barth's interpretation of Scripture during a time of great historical significance.

Renowned preacher William H. Willimon provides expert commentary on the theological and homiletical substance of each selection and points to the many ways in which Barth's early preaching can enrich the work of preachers today.


By Karl Barth and William H. Willimon. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2009. This book contains fourteen sermons preached by Karl Barth to the people of the small Swiss village of Safenwil between 1917 and 1920.

By Karl Barth and William H. They have been carefully selected by William Willimon, and translated by John E. Wilson. Barth began his pastorate in 1911, but the sermons come from the end of Barth's tenure in the pastorate - just before he left for a teaching post at Gottingen.

It was a good introduction to Karl Barth. There were 3-4 Christmas sermons which were particularly good.

Karl Barth (1886-1968) was Professor of Theology at the University of Basel, Switzerland. One of the greatest theologians and preachers of the twentieth century, he is best known for his monumental systematic theology, Church Dogmatics.

Текущий слайд {CURRENT SLIDE} из {TOTAL SLIDES}- Пользователи, купившие этот товар, также приобрели. Oxford World's Classics: On Christian Teaching by Saint Augustine (2008, Paperback). Willimon

by Karl Barth and William H. This volume offers a fascinating glimpse into Barth's interpretation of Scripture during a time of great historical significance.

Karl Barth, William H.

Westminster John Knox, 2009. The Strange New World Within the Bible, in A Map of Twentieth-century Theology: Readings from Karl Barth to Radical Pluralism. Braaten, eds. Fortress Press, 1995.

Willimon, William H. Conversations with Barth on Preaching. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2006. Compiled by David Guretzki, PhD December 2010.

Introduction by William H. Louisville, K. Westminster John Knox Press, 2009. Foreward by David G. Buttrick. Willimon, William H. The Strange New World of Confidence: Barth's Dialectical Exhortation to Fearful Preachers. Teaching Preaching: Rehabilitating Imitative Practice with Insights from Donald Schön.

Readers of William H. Willimon’s many books have long found there the influence of Karl Barth, probably the most significant theologian of the twentieth century

Readers of William H. Willimon’s many books have long found there the influence of Karl Barth, probably the most significant theologian of the twentieth century. In this new book Willimon explores that relationship explicitly by engaging Barth’s work on the pitfalls and problems, glories and grandeur of preaching the Word of God. The Swiss theologian, says the author, expressed one of the highest theologies of preaching of any of the great theologians of the church. Yet too much of Barth’s understanding of preaching lies buried in the Church Dogmatics and other, sometimes obscure, sources.

Talk about The Early Preaching of Karl Barth: Fourteen Sermons with Commentary by William H. Willimon


Feri
This was a pleasant surprise. Weekly sermons preached by a young, earnest, pastor to a rural congregation in a small town in the early 20th Century. Sermons encouraging them to think deeply about the limitations of their imaginations, and the overwhelmingly greater importance of the faithfulness of God.
You have to feel sorry for the farm hands, shop assistants, child minders and school children forming the congregation. They could have had little understanding of whatever their Pastor was rabbiting on about. It would not have been much help to hear these words and then face the mundane problems of real life.
The comments by William Willimon are illuminating. They are not uncritical, but are inclined to be over indulgent to the scholar who bewildered his congregation. Come on, the model preacher who founded the Movement spoke of sheep and coins and farming and fishing and baking. They may not have understood him over much either, but at least he did not string words together that require a University training to start to make sense of them.
The sermons were still a pleasure to read by someone who has never worked with his hands
Zugar
Marvelous collection of sermons with good commentary. It was a good introduction to Karl Barth. There were 3-4 Christmas sermons which were particularly good.
Duktilar
A Great resource for those interested in Pastor Karl Barth. An Encouraging, insightful, and a very well written scholarly work.
Iesha
THE EARLY PREACHING OF KARL BARTH: Fourteen Sermons with Commentary by William H. Willimon. By Karl Barth and William H. Willimon. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2009. Xvii + 171.

Preaching has changed over the years, whether for the good or ill is difficult to say. In an earlier day, at least as seen from reading sermons by the young Karl Barth, preachers demanded more of the listeners than is normally expected of someone sitting in the pews today. There is less emphasis on the "practical" and more on the "theological."

This book contains fourteen sermons preached by Karl Barth to the people of the small Swiss village of Safenwil between 1917 and 1920. They have been carefully selected by William Willimon, and translated by John E. Wilson. Barth began his pastorate in 1911, but the sermons come from the end of Barth's tenure in the pastorate - just before he left for a teaching post at Gottingen. They also come from an interesting period of European history - from the closing years of World War I through the immediate aftermath. It is a period of transition, marked by the Revolution in Russia - an event that is very much present in Barth's mind and preaching. Both the war and the revolution seem to represent the movement into a new age, where old paradigms no longer hold true.

The sermons represent Barth's period of turning from the liberalism of his theological training. Themes that appear in the Romans commentaries are present as well. As he preaches, his focus is not on anthropology, but Christology. His sermons point to the in breaking of the divine, the wholly other, into the world. His sermons, while not always strictly rooted in the text, seek to be true to the biblical message. He takes the bible seriously, and expects to hear from it a word from God. And yet at times the sermon, while theologically deep, seems oddly distant from the text itself. These are not, necessarily, expository sermons. But they do seek to connect with the text as touchstone.

These are very theological and even philosophical essays. As Willimon notes, his "preaching is counter to just about everything contemporary preachers have been told we ought to be in our preaching" (p. ix). They are challenging, even for the theologically trained, and so one wonders how they were received by Barth's original audience. Willimon does hint that Barth saw himself as a failure, so that does suggest he might have misread his congregation.

As one reads the sermons, one gets the sense of a change of ideas. There is a darkness that hangs over the sermons, a recognition that we as human beings are caught in the grip of sin. There is also that sense here, especially as the years pass, that God is truly "wholly other." We are unable to rectify our situation on our own, and thus we must turn to God for help, but we can't approach God unless God first approaches us - thus the strong Christological message. There is a strong protest here against "religion," which he famously saw as humans trying to climb their way to the hidden God. Thus, as one peers into his vision of the world and God's interaction with the world, one sees little of the optimism of an earlier Protestant liberalism, an optimism that seemed to think humanity was ready to remake itself on its own. The War had thoroughly shaken that sentiment from him.

This is a collection of sermons that preachers need to read simply because they stand as a protest against shallow preaching. Barth may not have been a perfect preacher or pastor. Indeed, he may have been a failure at both. We need not copy his style or his theology. But, Barth reminds - as does Willimon - that our job as preachers is not to mimic the self-help gurus in the pulpit. We are called to address the issues of life and death from a different place. While Willimon can be rather critical of Barth in his comments, and while he doesn't always believe that a sermon works as a sermon, and while does think that over time Barth's preaching did improve, Willimon believes that we can learn something important from Barth. Indeed, the essence of the message here is contained in this comment by Willimon attached to the final sermon in the collection: "Whereas it is popular today for purpose-driven, prosperity preachers to commend Jesus as the solution to our problems, the key to a happier life, and a technique for getting whatever it is we happen to crave, more than Jesus (Feuerbach ascendit!), Barth says that the only way to think such drivel is never to have met Jesus. The preacher has contempt for these who, by forgetting Jesus, contrive to make God 'accessible, inexpensive, cheap.' Ouch." (p. 153).

And Willimon notes that it's no surprise that Joel Osteen rarely refers to Jesus. Barth, on the other hand, is very much willing to put his focus on Jesus, and call us to a different kind of faith. The way of grace isn't an easy path. It doesn't involve a nice walk, but rather takes us on a narrow path, with only one possible path to take. There is no place to rest comfortably. Still, "we have no choice, but to keep moving forward on this way attentively, carefully and without stopping" (p. 123).

Willimon is to be commended for bringing to our attention this collection of sermons, for it allows us not only to see the flowering of Barth's theological imagination, but provides us a challenge as preachers to think deeply about the message we bring to our congregations. Are we willing to take a more difficult, costly path?
Mitynarit
How do you critique Karl Barth, one of the most important theologians of the 20th century, if not modern Western Christianity? You cannot, so I will simply leave this review to the translation and the commentary.

This is the first time that these sermons have appeared in English, and they are each one as powerful as the next. Translated by John E. Wilson, there is none of the translation clatter which might accompany the work. They read as natural in English as they would have been spoken in German. The NRSV has been used, unless Barth's translation is different than the English translation, and Barth's underlining of segments has made it through as italicized words.

What Willimon has done is to assemble Barth's early sermons, those given while he was still a 'country preacher' in Safenwil, Switzerland, into a contemporary commentary on our present society. Barth preached these sermons between 1917 and 1920, when the guns of war thundered across Europe, Socialism was on the rise, and much of the aristocratic structure of European society was being questioned. There was change in the air, and Barth as on the front of it.

In providing commentary, Willimon leaves Barth to his own devices, but reminds us of them. He sets the context for the readers of Barth, trying to bring us along side his listeners. He does set himself, though, as the object of many of Barth's sermons, examining himself in the light of the preacher's words. Sometimes, he admits that he simply has no clue where Barth is coming from - he doesn't offer correction - and at other times, he acknowledges that his 21st century American mind has a lot to do with it. Willimon handles Barth with respect, but not hero-worship.

This book is more than a collection of Barth's early sermons, but an examination into the 'youthful irony' of the man set in a world not unlike our own. It is an instructional book for young preachers, and in finding that Barth can speak volumes on a passage alone, I am left to wonder at my own dereliction of duty in not applying the text more instead of simply rearranging vast portions of the text. Willimon's commentary provides hard hitting thoughts, and can be used for devotional study in of itself. This book is simply a much, not only for admirers of Barth, but for preachers, ministers, and lay-Christians alike.