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Download A People Apart: The Jews in Europe, 1789-1939 (Oxford History of Modern Europe) ePub

by David Vital

Download A People Apart: The Jews in Europe, 1789-1939 (Oxford History of Modern Europe) ePub
  • ISBN 0198219806
  • ISBN13 978-0198219804
  • Language English
  • Author David Vital
  • Publisher Oxford University Press; First Edition edition (September 9, 1999)
  • Pages 968
  • Formats rtf txt mobi lrf
  • Category Different
  • Subcategory Humanities
  • Size ePub 1271 kb
  • Size Fb2 1161 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 474

The twentieth century has seen both the greatest triumph of Jewish history (the birth of the nation of Israel) and its greatest tragedy (the state sponsored genocide of the Holocaust). A People Apart is the first study to examine the role played by the Jews themselves, across the whole of Europe, during the century and a half leading up to these events. In this monumental work of history, David Vital explores the Jews' troubled relationship with Europe, documenting the struggles of this "nation without a territory" to establish a place for itself within an increasingly polarized and nationalist continent. The book ranges across the whole of the continent during this crucial period, examining Jewish communities in all the major countries, describing everything from incrementalism in England to the impenetrable hostility to be found in Germany. The author describes pogroms, poverty, and migration, the image of the Jew as revolutionary, the rise of Zionism and the "Palestinian idea," and much more. Vital is particularly interested in the dynamics within the Jewish community, examining the clash between politically neutral traditionalists and a new group of activists, whose unprecedented demands for national and political self-determination were stimulated both by increasing civil emancipation and the mounting effort to drive the Jews out of Europe altogether. The book ends on a controversial note, with Vital suggesting that the fate of the Jewish people was to some degree their own doing; at times, by their own autonomous action and choice; at others, by inaction and default. This powerful and stimulating new analysis represents a watershed in our understanding of the history of the Jews in Europe.

A People Apart: The Jews in Europe, 1789–1939 (1999) by David Vital. Bulgaria (2007) by .

The Oxford History of Modern Europe is a series of books on the history of Modern Europe published by the Clarendon Press (an imprint of Oxford University Press) from 1954. The most recent volume appeared in 2012. Writing in 2005, David Stevenson observed that the series "belongs to a more leisured era" and noted that no volumes have ever published which deal with Austria, Italy and Soviet Russia. Nonetheless, he observed that "the formula has generated a number of classics, which have remained in print for decades. A People Apart: The Jews in Europe, 1789–1939 (1999) by David Vital.

Most histories of the Jews in Europe, even those written by Jews, are written from a Eurocentric (Christian) viewpoint, looking at the Jews from the outside

Most histories of the Jews in Europe, even those written by Jews, are written from a Eurocentric (Christian) viewpoint, looking at the Jews from the outside. This book is from a Jewish point of view, and makes no apologies. Unfortunately, "A People Apart" only repeats the old, ethnocentric, anti-Polish sentiments without even the slightest attempt at objectivity. One of the most glaring examples of this partisan attitude is the fragment regarding the "pogrom" in Lvov in November 1918 (. 38).

A People Apart is the first study to examine the role played by the Jews .

A People Apart is the first study to examine the role played by the Jews themselves, across the whole ofEurope, during the century and a half leading up to these events. David Vital explores the Jews' troubled relationship with Europe, documenting the struggles of this 'nation without a territory' to establish a place for itself within an increasingly polarized and nationalist continent.

Paradoxically, in a book with the title A People Apart, it sometimes seems .

Paradoxically, in a book with the title A People Apart, it sometimes seems that Vital is more interested in those rulers than in the Jews themselves; or if that overstates the matter, one is nonetheless tempted to remark that his eye seems almost equally jaundiced in looking at Jewish leaders, while the Jewish people, the more anonymous masses, remain, well, pretty anonymous: Again, this is an older variety of history, one concerned primarily with leaders, their ideas, institutions, and activities, and not with the masses

This has been the case with no other race of mankind’, and who denounced Jews as the murderers of Christ, blasphemers of his Gospel, and parasites.

Bibliographic Citation. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. The Yivo Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe . Hundert, Gershon David (2008). Related Items in Google Scholar.

A People Apart: The Jews of Europe, an elegant, breathtaking history of European Jewry from 1789 to 1939 by Israeli scholar David Vital . One of the better books that I've read on the history of Jews in Europe before the 2nd. World War began.

A People Apart: The Jews of Europe, an elegant, breathtaking history of European Jewry from 1789 to 1939 by Israeli scholar David Vital sheds light on the paradox. A decade in the making, a probing a Why can't Jews take & for an answer?" asks Jerome Chanes about a people so well assimilated into American life but remains so anxious about its security and future. The response to the paradox of Jewish spiritual discomfort amidst social integration and material plenty is found in Jewish history.

David Vital explores the Jews' troubled relationship with Europe, documenting the struggles of this 'nation without a territory' to establish a place for itself within an increasingly polarized and nationalist continent. He examines the clash within the Jewish community between politically neutral traditionalists and a new group of activists, whose unprecedented demands for national and political self-determination were stimulated both by increasing civil emancipation and the mounting effort to drive the Jews out of Europe altogether.

David Vital's densely argued and documented A People Apart: The Jews of Europe 1789-1939 is a fiercely dispassionate, perhaps definitive analysis of what led to the destruction of European Jewry (Frederic Raphael The Sunday Times). The twentieth century has seen both the greatest triumph of Jewish history and its greatest tragedy: the birth of the nation of Israel, and the state-sponsored genocide of the Holocaust

David Vital explores the Jews' troubled relationship with Europe, documenting the struggles of this 'nation without a territory' to establish a place for itself within an increasingly polarized and nationalist continent.

Talk about A People Apart: The Jews in Europe, 1789-1939 (Oxford History of Modern Europe)


Redfury
A masterpiece
Painwind
A required book for understanding Jewish life since the French Revolution. The book is tragic, but isn't that Jewish life in general?
Rainpick
Used this book for my seminar classes and it was extremely helpful. It reads easily and gives plenty of information that can be used for almost any paper.
Arador
This is a thorough and detailed examination of Jewish history. In my view, this is the beginning of any serious analysis of the time period. The book which provides a through review of many original sources with many areas of research. For example, the Nuremberg laws were not a horrible group of laws afflicting a group, but a return to pre-Weimar laws.
The only criticism is that the review can be depressing as the writer chronicles various anti-Jewish laws andd oppression.

Frequently the Jews seem to be doing all right and then a problem arises, and a threat to expel them prompts the Jewish community to raise money and hope that their saving will prevent expulsion. The book is basically a strong argument for a Jewish state and demonstrates the many difficulties people had as second-class citizens.
Unirtay
A fantastic book, full of ideas, that will be rewarding even for readers who know quite a bit about Jewish History. Most histories of the Jews in Europe, even those written by Jews, are written from a Eurocentric (Christian) viewpoint, looking at the Jews from the outside. This book is from a Jewish point of view, and makes no apologies. Does anyone remember what happened to the Jews in Europe, and not just during the Third Reich?
This is a demanding book, Vital likes long sentences, but doesn't waste words. Anyone who reads this book will be in a position to think more clearly about the position of the Jews in history and of minorities in the Western world. I wish every intelligent person would read this book.
Fordregelv
I enjoyed this book in spite of the above review. In fact I was so enthralled I read it in a very short time. The reader should be warned that it is far from a complete history of the Jews in that time period. The author focuses almost entirely on political Jewish nationalism, Jewish socialism, and Zionism. I think that although most European Jews at the time were traditional or orthodox, those that assimilated were a very diverse lot politically, culturally, and socially. Really the book touches on only a small minority of Jews. Mr. Vital's focus and the book's title would have one think otherwise. With those caveats in mind I highly recommend this book.
Not-the-Same
I picked up Mr. Vital's book in the hope of finding in it a balanced, scholarly treatment of the much-misunderstood subject of Polish-Jewish relations from the late 19th century up to 1939. Unfortunately, "A People Apart" only repeats the old, ethnocentric, anti-Polish sentiments without even the slightest attempt at objectivity.
One of the most glaring examples of this partisan attitude is the fragment regarding the "pogrom" in Lvov in November 1918 (p.738). There exists a large literature on the subject in Polish, which presents a completely different picture; Mr. Vital supports his scathing condemnation of the Poles with a single quote from a propaganda brochure written by a Jewish author in French!
This selective attitude toward the sources is very visible in the bibliography. Although Mr. Vital's discussion of Polish Jewry takes several hundred pages, and the quoted publications number close to 500, I could find there just one(!) text in Polish, and even this one only tangentially related to the subject. If this was done because of the linguistic difficulties for the non-Polish reader, why quote dozens of works in Hebrew? In any case, Polish authors writing in French or English didn't fare much better (four or five references).
All in all, Mr. Vital's book, although rather monumental in scope, is quite parochial in perspective.